Results for 'Göran Duus‐Otterström'

22 found
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  1.  9
    Exploring Human-Tech Hybridity at the Intersection of Extended Cognition and Distributed Agency: A Focus on Self-Tracking Devices.Rikke Duus, Mike Cooray & Nadine C. Page - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  2.  29
    Personhood and First-Personal Experience.Richard E. Duus - 2017 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 37 (2):109-127.
    There is a gap between the first-person and third-person perspectives resulting in a tension experienced between psychological science, ‘experimental psychology’, and applied consulting psychological practice, ‘clinical psychology’. This is an exploration of that ‘gap’ and its resulting tension. First-person perspective is proposed as an important aspect of psychological reality in conjunction with the related perspectival aspects of second- and third-person perspectives. These three aspects taken ‘wholistically’ constitute a perspectival diffusion grate through which psychological reality is discerned. The reductionistic naturalism of (...)
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  3.  11
    Party Rivalry and Political Change in Taishō JapanParty Rivalry and Political Change in Taisho Japan.Haruhiro Fukui & Peter Duus - 1971 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (2):354.
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  4.  5
    The Cambridge History of Japan, Vol. 6: The Twentieth Century.Byron K. Marshall & Peter Duus - 1991 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 111 (3):624.
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  5.  3
    Feudalism in Japan.William B. Hauser & Peter Duus - 1972 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 92 (4):545.
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  6.  52
    Fairness-Based Retributivism Reconsidered.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (3):481-498.
    In this paper, I defend fairness-based retributivism against two important objections, the no-benefit objection and the social injustice objection. I argue that the theory can defeat the no-benefit objection by developing an account of how crimes can be sources of unfairness by inflicting losses on people, and that it can blunt the social injustice objection by toning down the theory’s distributive aspirations. I conclude that fairness-based retributivism, contrary to received wisdom, merits further attention from legal and political philosophers.
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  7.  31
    Injustice and the Right to Punish.Göran Duus‐Otterström & Erin I. Kelly - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (2):e12565.
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  8.  45
    The Problem of Past Emissions and Intergenerational Debts.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2014 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (4):448-469.
  9.  14
    Fair-Play Obligations and Distributive Injustice.Göran Duus-Otterström - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511877862.
    This article investigates the relationship between distributive injustice and political obligation within the confines of the fair-play theory of political obligation. More specifically, it asks how the distribution of benefits and burdens of a cooperative scheme affects people’s fair-play obligations to that scheme. It argues that neither a sufficiency-based nor a proportionality-based approach is capable of answering that question singlehandedly. However, the two approaches can be combined in a plausible way. Noting that some of the duties that go into our (...)
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  10.  13
    Humanitarian Intervention and Historical Responsibility.Fredrik D. Hjorthen & Göran Duus-Otterström - 2016 - Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):187-203.
    ABSTRACTSome suggest that the duty of humanitarian intervention should be discharged by states that are historically responsible for the occurrence of violence. A fundamental problem with this suggestion is that historically responsible states might be ill-suited to intervene because they are unlikely to enjoy support from the local population. Cécile Fabre has suggested a way around that problem, arguing that responsible states ought to pay for humanitarian interventions even though they ought not to take part in the military operations. We (...)
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  11.  21
    Benefiting From Injustice and the Common-Source Problem.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (5):1067-1081.
    According to the Beneficiary Pays Principle, innocent beneficiaries of an injustice stand in a special moral relationship with the victims of the same injustice. Critics have argued that it is normatively irrelevant that a beneficiary and a victim are connected in virtue of the same unjust 'source'. The aim of this paper is to defend the Beneficiary Pays Principle against this criticism. Locating the principle against the backdrop of corrective justice, it argues that the principle is correct in saying that (...)
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  12.  38
    Why Retributivists Should Endorse Leniency in Punishment.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (4):459-483.
    This paper develops a retributivist argument for leniency in punishment. It argues that even retributivists who defend desert-based punishment have a reason, internal to their view, to prefer more lenient over more severe punishments when there are doubts concerning how much punishment an offender deserves. This is because retributivists should take an asymmetrical view to underpunishment and overpunishment, and because the likelihood of overpunishment goes up with the severity of punishment. The radicalness of the ensuing leniency depends on the strength (...)
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  13.  13
    Retributivism and Public Opinion: On the Context Sensitivity of Desert.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2018 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 12 (1):125-142.
    Retributivism may seem wholly uninterested in the fit between penal policy and public opinion, but on one rendition of the theory, here called ‘popular retributivism,’ deserved punishments are constituted by the penal conventions of the community. This paper makes two claims against this view. First, the intuitive appeal of popular retributivism is undermined once we distinguish between context sensitivity and convention sensitivity about desert. Retributivism in general can freely accept context sensitivity without being committed to the stronger notion of convention (...)
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  14.  15
    Individual Climate Obligations and Non-Subsistence Emissions.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):27-30.
  15. Betting Against Hard Determinism.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (3):219-235.
    The perennial fear associated with the free will problem is the prospect of hard determinism being true. Unlike prevalent attempts to reject hard determinism by defending compatibilist analyses of freedom and responsibility, this article outlines a pragmatic argument to the effect that we are justified in betting that determinism is false even though we may retain the idea that free will and determinism are incompatible. The basic argument is that as long as we accept that libertarian free will is worth (...)
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  16.  33
    Almost Pregnant: On Probabilism and its Moral Uses in the Social Sciences.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2009 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (4):572-594.
    The turn from deterministic to probabilistic explanations has been used to argue that social science does not explain human action in ways that are incompatible with free will, since, according to some accounts of probabilism, causal factors merely influence actions without determining them. I argue that the notion of nondetermining causal influence is a multifaceted and problematic idea, which notably is unclear about whether the probability is objective or subjective, whether it applies to individual occurrences or merely to sets of (...)
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  17.  34
    Weak and Strong Luck Egalitarianism.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2012 - Contemporary Political Theory 11 (2):153-171.
  18.  28
    Freedom of Will and the Value of Choice.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):256-284.
    Many argue that our reasons to value choice do not depend on our having libertarian free will.The paper argues against this view. One reason to value choice is that it is constitutive of a life of self-determination. If choices are determined, however, they can be predicted and brought about by others; and if choices are randomly indeterministic, they can be mimicked. In either case, the importance of choice to self-determination is challenged. Thus, it is only as long as our choices (...)
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  19.  45
    Betting Against Compatibilism.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (4):383-396.
    Some argue that libertarianism represents the riskier incompatibilist view when it comes to the free will problem. An ethically cautious incompatibilist should bet that we are not free in the sense required for moral responsibility, these theorists claim, as doing so means that we no longer run the risk of holding the morally innocent responsible. In this paper, I show that the same reasoning also advises us to bet against compatibilism. Supposing that we are unsure about whether or not the (...)
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  20.  67
    Fallibility and Retribution.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (3):337-369.
    The fact that human fallibility virtually ensures that punishment will sometimes befall the innocent presents a theoretical puzzle to all forms of retributivism. Retributivists usually say that desert is a necessary condition for justified punishment. It remains unclear, following this view, how retributivists can support punishment in (imperfect) practice. The paper investigates a number of possible replies available to the retributivist. It concludes that one reply in particular can overcome the problem posed by fallibility, but it is not obvious that (...)
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  21.  21
    Predicting Human Cooperation in the Prisoner’s Dilemma Using Case-Based Decision Theory.Todd Guilfoos & Andreas Duus Pape - 2016 - Theory and Decision 80 (1):1-32.
  22.  17
    Weak and Strong Luck Egalitarianism.G.|[Ouml]|Ran Duus-Otterstr|[Ouml]|M. - 2012 - Contemporary Political Theory 11 (2):153.
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