30 found
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  1. Joint Action: Bodies and Minds Moving Together.Natalie Sebanz, Harold Bekkering & Günther Knoblich - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):70-76.
  2. Implications of Action-Oriented Paradigm Shifts in Cognitive Science.Peter F. Dominey, Tony J. Prescott, Jeannette Bohg, Andreas K. Engel, Shaun Gallagher, Tobias Heed, Matej Hoffmann, Gunther Knoblich, Wolfgang Prinz & Andrew Schwartz - 2016 - In Andreas K. Engel, Karl J. Friston & Danica Kragic (eds.), The Pragmatic Turn: Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science. MIT Press. pp. 333-356.
    An action-oriented perspective changes the role of an individual from a passive observer to an actively engaged agent interacting in a closed loop with the world as well as with others. Cognition exists to serve action within a landscape that contains both. This chapter surveys this landscape and addresses the status of the pragmatic turn. Its potential influence on science and the study of cognition are considered (including perception, social cognition, social interaction, sensorimotor entrainment, and language acquisition) and its impact (...)
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  3.  45
    Psychological Research on Joint Action : Theory and Data.Günther Knoblich, Stephen Andrew Butterfill & Natalie Sebanz - unknown
    When two or more people coordinate their actions in space and time to produce a joint outcome, they perform a joint action. The perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes that enable individuals to coordinate their actions with others have been receiving increasing attention during the last decade, complementing earlier work on shared intentionality and discourse. This chapter reviews current theoretical concepts and empirical findings in order to provide a structured overview of the state of the art in joint action research. We (...)
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  4.  39
    Representing Others' Actions: Just Like One's Own?Natalie Sebanz, Günther Knoblich & Wolfgang Prinz - 2003 - Cognition 88 (3):B11-B21.
  5.  29
    The Sense of Commitment: A Minimal Approach.John Michael, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  6.  19
    Experiencing Ownership Over a Dark-Skinned Body Reduces Implicit Racial Bias.Lara Maister, Natalie Sebanz, Günther Knoblich & Manos Tsakiris - 2013 - Cognition 128 (2):170-178.
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  7.  9
    Observing Joint Action: Coordination Creates Commitment.John Michael, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2016 - Cognition 157:106-113.
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  8.  16
    The Role of Shared Visual Information for Joint Action Coordination.Cordula Vesper, Laura Schmitz, Lou Safra, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2016 - Cognition 153:118-123.
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  9.  19
    Pianists Duet Better When They Play with Themselves: On the Possible Role of Action Simulation in Synchronization.Peter E. Keller, Günther Knoblich & Bruno H. Repp - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (1):102-111.
    Ensemble musicians play in synchrony despite expressively motivated irregularities in timing. We hypothesized that synchrony is achieved by each performer internally simulating the concurrent actions of other ensemble members, relying initially on how they would perform in their stead. Hence, musicians should be better at synchronizing with recordings of their own earlier performances than with others’ recordings. We required pianists to record one part from each of several piano duets, and later to play the complementary part in synchrony with their (...)
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  10.  30
    Action Identity: Evidence From Self-Recognition, Prediction, and Coordination.Günther Knoblich & Rüdiger Flach - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):620-632.
    Prior research suggests that the action system is responsible for creating an immediate sense of self by determining whether certain sensations and perceptions are the result of one's own actions. In addition, it is assumed that declarative, episodic, or autobiographical memories create a temporally extended sense of self or some form of identity. In the present article, we review recent evidence suggesting that action (procedural) knowledge also forms part of a person's identity, an action identity, so to speak. Experiments that (...)
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  11.  10
    The GROOP Effect: Groups Mimic Group Actions.Jessica Chia-Chin Tsai, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2011 - Cognition 118 (1):135-140.
  12.  18
    Inferring Agency From Sound.Günther Knoblich & Bruno H. Repp - 2009 - Cognition 111 (2):248-262.
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  13.  10
    Modulating Action Duration to Establish Nonconventional Communication.Cordula Vesper, Laura Schmitz & Günther Knoblich - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 146 (12):1722-1737.
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  14.  17
    Observing One’s Hand Become Anarchic: An fMRI Study of Action Identification.Dirk T. Leube, Günther Knoblich, Michael Erb & Tilo T. J. Kircher - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):597-608.
    The self seems to be a unitary entity remaining stable across time. Nevertheless, current theorizing conceptualizes the self as a number of interacting sub-systems involving perception, intention and action (self-model). One important function of such a self-model is to distinguish between events occurring as a result of one's own actions and events occurring as the result of somebody else's actions. We conducted an fMRI experiment that compared brain activation after an abrupt mismatch between one's own movement and its visual consequences (...)
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  15.  41
    Self-Recognition: Body and Action.Günther Knoblich - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):447-449.
  16.  42
    Human Body Perception From the Inside Out.Günther Knoblich, Ian M. Thornton, Marc Grosjean & Maggie Shiffrar (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume will be an invaluable guide for student and professional researchers in visual perception, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuroscience.
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  17.  41
    Agency in the Face of Error.Günther Knoblich & Natalie Sebanz - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (6):259-261.
  18.  33
    Grounding the Self in Action.Günther Knoblich, Birgit Elsner, Gisa Aschersleben & Thomas Metzinger - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):487-494.
  19.  4
    Collective Benefit in Joint Perceptual Judgments: Partial Roles of Shared Environments, Meta-Cognition, and Feedback.Pavel V. Voinov, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2019 - Cognition 189:116-130.
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  20.  23
    Social Learning: From Imitation to Joint Action.Natalie Sebanz, Harold Bekkering & Günther Knoblich - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):70-76.
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  21.  12
    How Memory Replay in Sleep Boosts Creative Problem-Solving.Penelope A. Lewis, Günther Knoblich & Gina Poe - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (6):491-503.
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  22.  8
    Observing Shared Attention Modulates Gaze Following.Anne Böckler, Günther Knoblich & Natalie Sebanz - 2011 - Cognition 120 (2):292-298.
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  23.  4
    Grounding the Self in Action.Günther Knoblich, Birgit Elsner, Gisa Ascherselben & Thomas Metzinger - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):87-494.
  24.  3
    Reciprocal Information Flow and Role Distribution Support Joint Action Coordination.Arianna Curioni, Cordula Vesper, Günther Knoblich & Natalie Sebanz - 2019 - Cognition 187:21-31.
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  25.  6
    Identifying Others’ Informative Intentions From Movement Kinematics.Luke McEllin, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2018 - Cognition 180:246-258.
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  26.  7
    Imitation From a Joint Action Perspective.Luke McEllin, Günther Knoblich & Natalie Sebanz - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (4):342-354.
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  27.  5
    When Height Carries Weight: Communicating Hidden Object Properties for Joint Action.Laura Schmitz, Cordula Vesper, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (6):2021-2059.
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  28.  1
    Co-Actors Represent the Order of Each Other’s Actions.Laura Schmitz, Cordula Vesper, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2018 - Cognition 181:65-79.
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  29.  1
    Joint Action Coordination in Expert-Novice Pairs: Can Experts Predict Novices’ Suboptimal Timing?Thomas Wolf, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2018 - Cognition 178:103-108.
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  30. The Role of the Mirror System in Embodied Communication.Gk Natalie Sebanz & Gunther Knoblich - 2008 - In Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen & Günther Knoblich (eds.), Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines. Oxford University Press.
     
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