Results for 'G��rard Eberl'

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  1.  1
    Rudolf Carnap, Logical Empiricist: Materials and Perspectives.Jaakko Hintikka (ed.) - 1975 - D. Reidel Pub. Co..
    "Homage to Rudolph Carnap."--Hempel, C. G. Rudolf Carnap, logical empiricist.--Wedberg, A. How Carnap built the world in 1928.--Eberle, R. A construction of quality classes improved upon the Aufbau.--Carnap, R. Observation language and theoretical language.--Kaplan, D. Significance and analyticity: a comment of some recent proposals of Carnap.--Wójcicki, R. The factual content of empirical theories.--Williams, P. M. On the conservative extensions of semantical systems: a contribution to the problem of analyticity.--Winnie, J. A. Theoretical analyticity.--Wedberg, A. Decision and belief in science.--Bohnert, H. G. (...)
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  2. G. E. Moore: Selected Writings.G. E. Moore - 1993 - Routledge.
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an External World (...)
     
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  3.  35
    Nonconceptua1 Content and the" Space of Reasons," RICHARD G.Richard G. Heck Jr - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (4):483-523.
    In The Varieties of Reference, Gareth Evans argues that the content of perceptual experience is nonconceptual, in a sense I shall explain momentarily. More recently, in his book Mind and World, John McDowell has argued that the reasons Evans gives for this claim are not compelling and, moreover, that Evans’s view is a version of “the Myth of the Given”: More precisely, Evans’s view is alleged to suffer from the same sorts of problems that plague sense-datum theories of perception. In (...)
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  4.  30
    Thomistic Principles and Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2006 - Routledge.
    Alongside a revival of interest in Thomism in philosophy, scholars have realised its relevance when addressing certain contemporary issues in bioethics. This book offers a rigorous interpretation of Aquinas's metaphysics and ethical thought, and highlights its significance to questions in bioethics. Jason T. Eberl applies Aquinas’s views on the seminal topics of human nature and morality to key questions in bioethics at the margins of human life – questions which are currently contested in the academia, politics and the media (...)
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  5.  16
    Eberle on Nominalism in Non-Atomic Systems.Richard Schuldenfrei - 1969 - Noûs 3 (4):427-430.
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  6.  9
    Protecting Reasonable Conscientious Refusals in Health Care.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):565-581.
    Recently, debate over whether health care providers should have a protected right to conscientiously refuse to offer legal health care services—such as abortion, elective sterilization, aid in dying, or treatments for transgender patients—has grown exponentially. I advance a modified compromise view that bases respect for claims of conscientious refusal to provide specific health care services on a publicly defensible rationale. This view requires health care providers who refuse such services to disclose their availability by other providers, as well as to (...)
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  7.  50
    Microorganisms as Scaffolds of Host Individuality: An Eco-Immunity Account of the Holobiont.Lynn Chiu & Gérard Eberl - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (6):819-837.
    There is currently a great debate about whether the holobiont, i.e. a multicellular host and its residential microorganisms, constitutes a biological individual. We propose that resident microorganisms have a general and important role in the individuality of the host organism, not the holobiont. Drawing upon the Equilibrium Model of Immunity, we argue that microorganisms are scaffolds of immune capacities and processes that determine the constituency and persistence of the host organism. A scaffolding perspective accommodates the contingency and heterogeneity of resident (...)
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  8. The Pareto Argument for Inequality*: G. A. COHEN.G. A. Cohen - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (1):160-185.
    Some ways of defending inequality against the charge that it is unjust require premises that egalitarians find easy to dismiss—statements, for example, about the contrasting deserts and/or entitlements of unequally placed people. But a defense of inequality suggested by John Rawls and elaborated by Brian Barry has often proved irresistible even to people of egalitarian outlook. The persuasive power of this defense of inequality has helped to drive authentic egalitarianism, of an old-fashioned, uncompromising kind, out of contemporary political philosophy. The (...)
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  9.  18
    Some Complete Calculi of Individuals.Rolf A. Eberle - 1967 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 8 (4):267-278.
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  10. Self-Ownership, World Ownership, and Equality: Part II: G. A. COHEN.G. A. Cohen - 1986 - Social Philosophy and Policy 3 (2):77-96.
    1. The present paper is a continuation of my “Self-Ownership, World Ownership, and Equality,” which began with a description of the political philosophy of Robert Nozick. I contended in that essay that the foundational claim of Nozick's philosophy is the thesis of self-ownership, which says that each person is the morally rightful owner of his own person and powers, and, consequently, that each is free to use those powers as he wishes, provided that he does not deploy them aggressively against (...)
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  11.  23
    Religion, Respect and Eberle’s Agapic Pacifist.Robert B. Talisse - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (3):313-325.
    Christopher Eberle has developed a powerful critique of justificatory liberalism. According to Eberle, justificatory liberalism’s doctrine of restraint , which requires religious citizens to refrain from publicly advocating for policies that can be supported only by their religious reasons, is illiberal. In this article, I defend justificatory liberalism against Eberle’s critique.
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  12.  81
    G. A. Cohen on Self‐Ownership, Property, and Equality.Tom G. Palmer - 1998 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 12 (3):225-251.
    Abstract G.A. Cohen has produced an influential criticism of libertarian?ism that posits joint ownership of everything in the world other than labor, with each joint owner having a veto right over any potential use of the world. According to Cohen, in that world rationality would require that wealth be divided equally, with no differential accorded to talent, ability, or effort. A closer examination shows that Cohen's argument rests on two central errors of reasoning and does not support his egalitarian conclusions, (...)
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  13.  28
    Why Eberl is Wrong. Reflections on the Beginning of Personhood.Jan Deckers - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (5):270–282.
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  14. Essays in Honor of Carl G. Hempel.Carl G. Hempel, Donald Davidson & Nicholas Rescher (eds.) - 1969 - Dordrecht: D. Reidel.
    Reminiscences of Peter, by P. Oppenheim.--Natural kinds, by W. V. Quine.--Inductive independence and the paradoxes of confirmation, by J. Hintikka.--Partial entailment as a basis for inductive logic, by W. C. Salmon.--Are there non-deductive logics?, by W. Sellars.--Statistical explanation vs. statistical inference, by R. C. Jeffre--Newcomb's problem and two principles of choice, by R. Nozick.--The meaning of time, by A. Grünbaum.--Lawfulness as mind-dependent, by N. Rescher.--Events and their descriptions: some considerations, by J. Kim.--The individuation of events, by D. Davidson.--On properties, by (...)
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  15.  43
    A Concordance to Euripides. By J. T. Allen and G. Italie. Pp. Xi + 686. Berkeley & Los Angeles: California University Press , 1954. £3 15s. [REVIEW]G. A. Longman - 1956 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 76:114-115.
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  16.  4
    Conscience, Compromise, and Complicity.Jason T. Eberl & Christopher Ostertag - 2018 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 92:161-174.
    Debate over whether health care institutions or individual providers should have a legally protected right to conscientiously refuse to offer legal services to patients who request them has grown exponentially due to the increasing legalization of morally contested services. This debate is particularly acute for Catholic health care providers. We elucidate Catholic teaching regarding the nature of conscience and the intrinsic value of being free to act in accord with one’s conscience. We then outline the primary positions defended in this (...)
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  17.  13
    Can Prudence Be Enhanced?Jason T. Eberl - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (5):506-526.
    Some bioethicists have argued that moral bioenhancement, complementing traditional means of enhancing individuals’ moral dispositions, is essential if we are to survive as a species. Traditional means of moral enhancement have historically included civil legislation, socially recognized moral exemplars, religious teachings and disciplines, and familial upbringing. I explore the necessity and feasibility of pursuing methods of moral bioenhancement as a complement to such traditional means, grounding my analysis within a virtue-theoretic framework. Specifically, I focus on the essential intellectual virtue for (...)
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  18. The Philosophy of Carl G. Hempel: Studies in Science, Explanation, and Rationality.Carl G. Hempel (ed.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Editor James Fetzer presents an analytical and historical introduction and a comprehensive bibliography together with selections of many of Carl G. Hempel's most important studies to give students and scholars an ideal opportunity to appreciate the enduring contributions of one of the most influential philosophers of science of the 20th century.
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  19.  19
    I Am My Brother’s Keeper: Communitarian Obligations to the Dying Person.Jason T. Eberl - 2018 - Christian Bioethics 24 (1):38-58.
    Contemporary arguments concerning the permissibility of physician-assisted suicide [PAS], or suicide in general, often rehearse classical arguments over whether individual persons have a fundamental right based on autonomy to determine their own death, or whether the community has a legitimate interest in individual members’ welfare that would prohibit suicide. I explicate historical arguments pertaining to PAS aligned with these poles. I contend that an ethical indictment of PAS entails moral duties on the part of one’s community to provide effective means (...)
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  20. Do Human Persons Persist Between Death and Resurrection?Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - In Kevin Timpe (ed.), Metaphysics and God: Essays in Honor of Eleonore Stump. Routledge.
    Thomas Aquinas presents an account of human immortality and bodily resurrection intended to be both faithful to Christian Scripture and metaphysically sound as following from the Aristotelian view of human nature. One central question is whether a human person persists between death and resurrection by virtue of her soul, given Aquinas’s hylomorphic account of human nature and assertion that a human person is not identical to her soul. Robert Pasnau contends that only a part of a person exists between death (...)
     
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  21.  3
    Purely Faith-Based Vs. Rationally-Informed Theological Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (12):14-16.
    Commentary on re-opening dialogue between theological and secular voices in bioethics.
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  22.  74
    The Difference Between Fichte's and Schelling's System of Philosophy: An English Translation of G. W. F. Hegel's Differenz des Fichte'schen Und Schelling'schen Systems der Philosophie. [REVIEW]G. W. F. Hegel - 1977 - State University of New York Press.
    In this essay, Hegel attempted to show how Fichte’s Science of Knowledge was an advance from the position of Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason, and how Schelling (and incidentally Hegel himself) had made a further advance from the position of Fichte.
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  23. Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Mind: The Collected Philosophical Papers of G. E. M. Anscombe Volume Two.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1981 - Blackwell.
  24. Varieties of Dualism: Swinburne and Aquinas.Jason T. Eberl - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (1):39-56.
    Thomas Aquinas argues that matter is informed by a rational soul to compose a human person. But a person may survive her body’s death since a rational soul is able to exist and function without matter. This leads to the typical characterization of Aquinas as a dualist. Thomistic dualism, however, is distinct from both Platonic dualism and various accounts of substance dualism offered by philosophers such as Richard Swinburne. For both Plato and Swinburne, a person is identical to an immaterial (...)
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  25.  38
    Malcolm on Language and Rules: G. P. Baker and P. M. S. Hacker.G. P. Baker - 1990 - Philosophy 65 (252):167-179.
    In ‘Wittgenstein on Language and Rules’, Professor N. Malcolm took us to task for misinterpreting Wittgenstein's arguments on the relationship between the concept of following a rule and the concept of community agreement on what counts as following a given rule. Not that we denied that there are any grammatical connections between these concepts. On the contrary, we emphasized that a rule and an act in accord with it make contact in language. Moreover we argued that agreement in judgments and (...)
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  26.  94
    The Collected Philosophical Papers of G.E.M. Anscombe.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1900 - Blackwell.
    -- v. 2. Metaphysics and the philosophy of mind.
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  27.  40
    A Thomistic Understanding of Human Death.Jason T. Eberl - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (1):29–48.
    I investigate Thomas Aquinas's metaphysical account of human death, which is defined in terms of a rational soul separating from its material body. The question at hand concerns what criterion best determines when this separation occurs. Aquinas argues that a body has a rational soul only insofar as it is properly organised to support the soul's vegetative, sensitive, and rational capacities. According to the ‘higher‐brain’ concept of death, when a body can no longer provide the biological foundation necessary for the (...)
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  28.  27
    The Ontological and Moral Significance of Persons.Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - Scientia et Fides 5 (2):217-236.
    Many debates in arenas such as bioethics turn on questions regarding the moral status of human beings at various stages of biological development or decline. It is often argued that a human being possesses a fundamental and inviolable moral status insofar as she is a “person”; yet, it is contested whether all or only human beings count as persons. Perhaps there are non-human person, and perhaps not every human being satisfies the definitional criteria for being a person. A further question, (...)
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  29.  5
    A Bioethical Vision.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 16 (2):279-293.
    Pope Francis has not put himself at the forefront of tendentious issues in bioethics, such as abortion, human embryonic stem cell research, cloning, contraception, and euthanasia. Nevertheless, his various addresses and magisterial documents such as Evangelii Gaudium and Laudato Si’ make clear that Pope Francis affirms the Church’s teaching on these issues. He has, though, proffered an additional moral lens through which to view such issues, namely, how they factor into the “culture of waste” that informs global society’s “sin of (...)
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  30.  3
    When First We Practice to Deceive.Jason T. Eberl & Erica K. Salter - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (5):15-17.
    We argue against Christopher Meyers’s call for clinical ethicists to participate in deceiving patients, surrogate decision-makers, or family members. While we acknowledge that some forms of deception may be ethically appropriate in highly circumscribed situations, the type of case Meyers describes as involving justifiable deception differs in at least two important ways. First, Meyers fails to distinguish acts of deception based on the critical feature of who is being deceived—patient, surrogate, or family member—and the overarching duty to respect the autonomy (...)
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  31.  19
    G. E. Moore: A Critical Exposition.G. J. Warnock - 1959 - Philosophical Review 68 (3):382.
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  32.  7
    Contemporary Controversies in Catholic Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl (ed.) - 2017 - Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
    This volume comprises various viewpoints representing a Catholic perspective on contemporary practices in medicine and biomedical research. The Roman Catholic Church has had a significant impact upon the formulation and application of moral values and principles to a wide range of controversial issues in bioethics. Catholic leaders, theologians, and bioethicists have elucidated and marshaled arguments to support the Church’s definitive positions on several bioethical issues, such as abortion, euthanasia, and reproductive cloning. Not all bioethical issues, however, have been definitively addressed (...)
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  33.  7
    Heymans, G. Einführung in die Metaphysik auf Gründlage der Erfahrung.G. Heymans - 1905 - Kant-Studien 10 (1-3).
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  34.  31
    Nominalistic Systems.Rolf A. Eberle - 1970 - Dordrecht: Reidel.
    1. 1. PROGRAM It will be our aim to reconstruct, with precision, certain views which have been traditionally associated with nominalism and to investigate problems arising from these views in the construction of interpreted formal systems. Several such systems are developed in accordance with the demand that the sentences of a system which is acceptable to a nominalist must not imply the existence of any entities other than individuals. Emphasis will be placed on the constructionist method of philosophical analysis. To (...)
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  35. Setting Things Before the Mind: M.G.F. Martin.M. G. F. Martin - 1998 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:157-179.
    Listening to someone from some distance in a crowded room you may experience the following phenomenon: when looking at them speak, you may both hear and see where the source of the sounds is; but when your eyes are turned elsewhere, you may no longer be able to detect exactly where the voice must be coming from. With your eyes again fixed on the speaker, and the movement of her lips a clear sense of the source of the sound will (...)
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  36.  4
    J. G. Herder on Social and Political Culture.J. G. Herder & F. M. Barnard - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    The texts collected in this volume, which was originally published in 1969, contain Herder's most original and stimulating ideas on politics, history and language. They had for the most part not been previously available in English. In his introduction, Professor Barnard analyses the basic premises of Herder's political thought against the background of the Enlightenment. He examines Herder's concepts of language, community and culture, his theory of historical interaction, and his approach to the problem of change and progress. Finally, he (...)
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  37.  7
    Antike Münzen. By K. Lange. Pp. 50; 68 Text Figs. + Map. Berlin: Verlag G. Mann, 1947.G. K. Jenkins - 1950 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 70:96-96.
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  38.  16
    The Neurophilosophy of Pain: G. R. Gillett.G. R. Gillett - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (256):191-206.
    The ability to feel pain is a property of human beings that seems to be based entirely in our biological natures and to place us squarely within the animal kingdom. Yet the experience of pain is often used as an example of a mental attribute with qualitative properties that defeat attempts to identify mental events with physiological mechanisms. I will argue that neurophysiology and psychology help to explain the interwoven biological and subjective features of pain and recommend a view of (...)
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  39.  44
    The Impact of Interactive Corporate Social Responsibility Communication on Corporate Reputation.David Eberle, Guido Berens & Ting Li - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):731-746.
    Companies increasingly communicate about corporate social responsibility (CSR) through interactive online media. We examine whether using such media is beneficial to a company’s reputation. We conducted an online experiment to examine the impacts of interactivity in CSR messages on corporate reputation and word-of-mouth intentions. Our findings suggest that an increase in perceived interactivity leads to higher message credibility and stronger feelings of identification with the company, which also boost corporate reputation and word-of-mouth. This result implies that using interactive channels to (...)
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  40.  73
    II—M.G.F. Martin.M. G. F. Martin - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):75-98.
  41.  13
    Disembodied Persons: G. R. Gillett.G. R. Gillett - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (237):377-386.
    In discussing Disembodied Persons we need to confront two problems: A. Under what conditions would we consider that a person was present in the absence of the normal bodily cues? B. Could such circumstances arise? The first question may be regarded as epistemic and the second as metaphysical.
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  42.  20
    An Assessment of R. G. Collingwood's.G. Buchdahl - 1948 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):94 – 113.
  43.  18
    Whose Head, Which Body?Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (4):221-223.
    Response to human head transplant proposal and pertinent personal identity questions.
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  44.  31
    The Christian Wager: R. G. SWINBURNE.R. G. Swinburne - 1969 - Religious Studies 4 (2):217-228.
    On what grounds will the rational man become a Christian? It is often assumed by many, especially non-Christians, that he will become a Christian if and only if he judges that the evidence available to him shows that it is more likely than not that the Christian theological system is true, that, in mathematical terms, on the evidence available to him, the probability of its truth is greater than half. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate whether or (...)
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  45.  47
    Aquinas on Euthanasia, Suffering, and Palliative Care.Jason T. Eberl - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (2):331-354.
    Euthanasia, today, is one of the most debated issues in bioethics. Euthanasia, at the time of Thomas Aquinas, was an unheard-of term. Nevertheless, while there is no direct statement with respect to “euthanasia” per se in the writings of Aquinas, Aquinas’s moral theory and certain theological commitments he held could be applied to the euthanasia question and thus bring Aquinas into contemporary bioethical debate. In this paper, I present the relevant aspects of Aquinas’s account of natural law and his theological (...)
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  46. Historiography and Enlightenment: A View of Their History: J. G. A. Pocock.J. G. A. Pocock - 2008 - Modern Intellectual History 5 (1):83-96.
    This essay is written on the following premises and argues for them. “Enlightenment” is a word or signifier, and not a single or unifiable phenomenon which it consistently signifies. There is no single or unifiable phenomenon describable as “the Enlightenment,” but it is the definite article rather than the noun which is to be avoided. In studying the intellectual history of the late seventeenth century and the eighteenth, we encounter a variety of statements made, and assumptions proposed, to which the (...)
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  47. Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care.Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed to enshrine (...)
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  48.  40
    The Collected Works of C. G. JUNG.C. G. H. G. Jung - 1953-54 - In Selected Letters of C.G. Jung, 1909-1961. Princeton University Press. pp. 201-210.
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  49. Metaphysical and Ethical Perspectives on Creating Animal-Human Chimeras.J. T. Eberl & R. A. Ballard - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (5):470-486.
    This paper addresses several questions related to the nature, production, and use of animal-human (a-h) chimeras. At the heart of the issue is whether certain types of a-h chimeras should be brought into existence, and, if they are, how we should treat such creatures. In our current research environment, we recognize a dichotomy between research involving nonhuman animal subjects and research involving human subjects, and the classification of a research protocol into one of these categories will trigger different ethical standards (...)
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  50.  2
    The Theory of Meaning. Ed. By G. H. R. Parkinson. (Repr.).G. H. R. Parkinson - 1968 - London: Oxford University Press.
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