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G. Anthony Bruno
Royal Holloway University of London
  1. From being to acting: Kant and Fichte on intellectual intuition.G. Anthony Bruno - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 31 (4):762-783.
    Fichte assigns ‘intellectual intuition’ a new meaning after Kant. But in 1799, his doctrine of intellectual intuition is publicly deemed indefensible by Kant and nihilistic by Jacobi. I propose to defend Fichte’s doctrine against these charges, leaving aside whether it captures what he calls the ‘spirit’ of transcendental idealism. I do so by articulating three problems that motivate Fichte’s redirection of intellectual intuition from being to acting: (1) the regress problem, which states that reflecting on empirical facts of consciousness leads (...)
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  2.  82
    ‘All is Act, Movement, and Life’: Fichte’s Idealism as Immortalism.G. Anthony Bruno - 2023 - In Luca Corti & Johannes-Georg Schülein (eds.), Life, Organisms, and Human Nature: New Perspectives on Classical German Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 121-139.
    In the Vocation of Man, Fichte makes the striking claim that life is eternal, rational, our true being, and the final cause of nature in general and of death in particular. How can we make sense of this claim? I argue that the public lectures that compose the Vocation are a popular expression of Fichte’s pre-existing commitment to what I call immortalism, the view that life is the unconditioned condition of intelligibility. Casting the I as an absolutely self-active or living (...)
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  3. 'From Time into Eternity': Schelling on Intellectual Intuition.G. Anthony Bruno - 2023 - Philosophy Compass 1 (4):e12903.
    Throughout his career, Schelling assigns knowledge of the absolute first principle of philosophy to intellectual intuition. Schelling's doctrine of intellectual intuition raises two important questions for interpreters. First, given that his doctrine undergoes several changes before and after his identity philosophy, to what extent can he be said to “hold onto” the same “sense” of it by the 1830s, as he claims? Second, given that his doctrine of intellectual intuition restricts absolute idealism to what he calls a “science of reason”, (...)
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  4. Schelling’s Philosophical Letters on Doctrine and Critique.G. Anthony Bruno - 2020 - In María Del Del Rosario Acosta López & Colin McQuillan (eds.), Critique in German Philosophy: From Kant to Critical Theory. SUNY Press.
    Kant’s critique/doctrine distinction tracks the difference between a canon for the understanding’s proper use and an organon for its dialectical misuse. The latter reflects the dogmatic use of reason to attain a doctrine of knowledge with no antecedent critique. In the 1790s, Fichte collapses Kant’s distinction and redefines dogmatism. He argues that deriving a canon is essentially dialectical and thus yields an organon: critical idealism is properly a doctrine of science or Wissenschaftslehre. Criticism is furthermore said to refute dogmatism, by (...)
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  5. Genealogy and Jurisprudence in Fichte’s Genetic Deduction of the Categories.G. Anthony Bruno - 2018 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 35 (1):77-96.
    Fichte argues that the conclusion of Kant’s transcendental deduction of the categories is correct yet lacks a crucial premise, given Kant’s admission that the metaphysical deduction locates an arbitrary origin for the categories. Fichte provides the missing premise by employing a new method: a genetic deduction of the categories from a first principle. Since Fichte claims to articulate the same view as Kant in a different, it is crucial to grasp genetic deduction in relation to the sorts of deduction that (...)
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  6. Facticity and Genesis: Tracking Fichte’s Method in the Berlin Wissenschaftslehre.G. Anthony Bruno - 2021 - Fichte-Studien 49:177-97.
    The concept of facticity denotes conditions of experience whose necessity is not logical yet whose contingency is not empirical. Although often associated with Heidegger, Fichte coins ‘facticity’ in his Berlin period to refer to the conclusion of Kant’s metaphysical deduction of the categories, which he argues leaves it a contingent matter that we have the conditions of experience that we do. Such rhapsodic or factical conditions, he argues, must follow necessarily, independent of empirical givenness, from the I through a process (...)
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  7. Schelling on the Unconditioned Condition of the World.G. Anthony Bruno - 2021 - In Thomas Buchheim, Thomas Frisch & Nora C. Wachsmann (eds.), Schellings Freiheitsschrift: Methode, System, Kritik. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.
    In the Freedom essay, Schelling charges that (1) idealism fails to grasp human freedom’s distinctiveness and that (2) this failure undermines idealism's attempt to refute pantheism, as exemplified by Spinoza. This raises two questions, which I will answer in turn: what, for Schelling, is distinctive of human freedom; and how does the idealists’ failure to grasp it render them unable to refute pantheism? To answer these questions, I will reconstruct Schelling’s argument that freedom has the distinctness of being the unconditioned (...)
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  8. The Parallactic Leap: Fichte, Apperception, and the Hard Problem of Consciousness.G. Anthony Bruno - 2021 - In Dominik Finkelde, Slavoj Zizek & Christoph Menke (eds.), Parallax: The Dialectics of Mind and World. London:
    This paper focuses on the normative turn in Fichte’s critique of dogmatism to show how an inward shift in perspective changes the meanings of all of our terms and, therewith, the nature of objectivity. The world that seems factual and to exclude normativity is displaced by a world constituted by the normative framework of judging and acting subjects. Hence, the world that poses an alleged hard problem of consciousness is displaced by one whose problems are, in the first instance, practical (...)
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  9. Freedom and Pluralism in Schelling’s Critique of Fichte’s Jena Wissenschaftslehre.G. Anthony Bruno - 2013 - Idealistic Studies 43 (1-2):71-86.
    Our understanding of Schelling’s internal critique of German idealism, including his late attack on Hegel, is incomplete unless we trace it to the early “Philosophical Letters on Dogmatism and Criticism,” which initiate his engagement with the problem of systematicity—that judgment makes deriving a system of a priori conditions from a first principle necessary, while this capacity’s finitude makes this impossible. Schelling aims to demonstrate this problem’s intractability. My conceptual aim is to reconstruct this from the “Letters,” which reject Fichte’s claim (...)
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  10. The Facticity of Time: Conceiving Schelling’s Idealism of Ages.G. Anthony Bruno - 2020 - In Schelling’s Philosophy: Freedom, Nature, and Systematicity. Oxford University Press.
    Scholars agree that Schelling’s critique of Hegel consists in charging reason with an inability to account for its own possibility. This is not an attack on reason’s project of constructing a logical system, but rather on the pretense of doing so with complete justification and so without presuppositions, as if it were obvious why there is a logical system or why there is anything meaningful at all. Scholars accordingly cite the question ‘why is there something rather than nothing’ as emblematic (...)
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  11. Quietism, Dialetheism, and the Three Moments of Hegel's Logic.G. Anthony Bruno - 2023 - In Metaphysics as a Science in Classical German Philosophy.
    The history of philosophy risks a self-opacity whereby we overestimate or underestimate our proximity to prior modes of thinking. This risk is relevant to assessing Hegel’s appropriation by McDowell and Priest. McDowell enlists Hegel for a quietist answer to the problem with assuming that concepts and reality belong to different orders, viz., how concepts are answerable to the world. If we accept Hegel’s absolute idealist view that the conceptual is boundless, this problem allegedly dissolves. Priest enlists Hegel for a dialetheist (...)
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  12. Schelling, Cavell, and the Truth of Skepticism.G. Anthony Bruno - 2021 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 9 (9).
    This paper argues that McDowell wrongly assumes that “terror”, Cavell’s reaction to the radical contingency of our shared modes of knowing or our “attunement”, expresses a skepticism that is antinomically bound to an equally unacceptable dogmatism because Cavell rather regards terror as a mood that reveals the “truth of skepticism”, namely, that there is no conclusive evidence for necessary attunement on pain of a category error, and that a precedent for McDowell’s misunderstanding is Hegel’s argument for necessary attunement in a (...)
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  13. “As From a State of Death”: Schelling’s Idealism as Mortalism.G. Anthony Bruno - 2016 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 8 (3):288-301.
    If a problem is the collision between a system and a fact, Spinozism and German idealism’s greatest problem is the corpse. Life’s end is problematic for the denial of death’s qualitative difference from life and the affirmation of nature’s infinite purposiveness. In particular, German idealism exemplifies immortalism – the view that life is the unconditioned condition of all experience, including death. If idealism cannot explain the corpse, death is not grounded on life, which invites mortalism – the view that death (...)
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  14. Post-Kantian Idealism and Self-Transformation.G. Anthony Bruno - 2023 - In G. Anthony Bruno & Justin Vlasits (eds.), Transformation and the History of Philosophy.
    While the idea that philosophy requires self-transformation is historically pervasive, it exerts considerable influence on the post-Kantians who first aim to systematize Kant’s idealism by grounding it on a first principle. In the 1790s, Fichte and Schelling offer competing accounts of the self-transformation that they regard as essential to positing a first principle. Their accounts raise two central questions. First, what makes this kind of self-transformation possible? Second, are there different possible expressions of philosophical self-transformation? In what follows, I will (...)
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  15.  86
    Transformation and the History of Philosophy.G. Anthony Bruno & Justin Vlasits (eds.) - 2023 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    From ancient conceptions of becoming a philosopher to modern discussions of psychedelic drugs, the concept of transformation plays a fascinating part in the history of philosophy. However, until now there has been no sustained exploration of the full extent of its role. Transformation and the History of Philosophy is an outstanding survey of the history, nature, and development of the idea of transformation, from the ancient period to the twentieth century. Comprising twenty-two specially commissioned chapters by an international team of (...)
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  16. Empirical Realism and the Great Outdoors: A Critique of Meillassoux.G. Anthony Bruno - 2017 - In Marie-Eve Morin (ed.), Continental Realism and its Discontents. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 1-15.
    Meillassoux seeks knowledge of transcendental reality, blaming Kant for the ‘correlationist’ proscription of independent access to either thought or being. For Meillassoux, correlationism blocks an account of the meaning of ‘ancestral statements’ regarding reality prior to humans. I examine three charges on which Meillassoux’s argument depends: (1) Kant distorts ancestral statements’ meaning; (2) Kant fallaciously infers causality’s necessity; (3) Kant’s transcendental idealism cannot grasp ‘the great outdoors’. I reject these charges: (1) imposes a Cartesian misreading, hence Meillassoux’s false assumption that, (...)
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  17. The Appearance and Disappearance of Intellectual Intuition in Schelling’s Philosophy.G. Anthony Bruno - 2013 - Analecta Hermeneutica 5:1-14.
    Schelling scholars face an uphill battle. His confinement to the smallest circles of ‘continental’ thought puts him at the margins of what today counts as philosophy. His eclipse by Fichte and Hegel and inheritance by better-read thinkers like Kierkegaard and Heidegger tend to reduce him to a historical footnote. And the sometimes obscure formulations he uses makes the otherwise difficult writings of fellow post-Kantians seem comparatively more accessible. For those seeking to widen these circles, see through this eclipse and elucidate (...)
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  18. Logical and Moral Aliens Within Us: Kant on Theoretical and Practical Self-Conceit.G. Anthony Bruno - 2023 - In Jens Pier (ed.), Limits of Intelligibility: Issues from Kant and Wittgenstein. Routledge.
    This chapter intervenes in recent debates in Kant scholarship about the possibility of a general logical alien. Such an alien is a thinker whose laws of thinking violate ours. She is third-personal as she is radically unlike us. Proponents of the constitutive reading of Kant’s conception of general logic accordingly suggest that Kant rules out the possibility of such an alien as unthinkable. I add to this an often-overlooked element in Kant’s thinking: there is reason to think that he grants—and (...)
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  19. Determinacy, Indeterminacy, and Contingency in German Idealism.G. Anthony Bruno - 2018 - In Gregory S. Moss Robert H. Scott (ed.), The Significance of Indeterminacy: Perspectives from Asian and Continental Philosophy. Routledge.
    This paper addresses debates in German idealism that arise in response to the modal shift in logic, proposed by Kant, from a logic of thinking to a logic of experience. With the Kantian logic of experience arises a problem of radical contingency or 'rhapsodic determination' for logic. While Fichte and Hegel attempt to resolve the problem of contingency by constructing rational systems aimed at established the grounds for logic, I show how Schelling brings into view, in a proto-existentialist movement, the (...)
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  20. Skepticism, Deduction, and Reason’s Maturation.G. Anthony Bruno - 2018 - In Skepticism: Historical and Contemporary Inquiries. Routledge. pp. 203-19.
    A puzzle arises when we consider that, for Kant, the categories are 'original acquisitions' of our understanding to which we must nevertheless prove our entitlement via 'deduction', on pain of dogmatism. I resolve this puzzle by articulating skepticism’s role in the transcendental deduction, drawing on Kant’s construal of the skeptical 'question quid juris' in the juridical terms of entitlement to property. I then situate skepticism’s transformative potential within what Kant regards as reason’s 'maturation' from dogmatism toward self-knowledge. Finally, I contrast (...)
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  21. Jacobi's Dare: McDowell, Meillassoux, and Consistent Idealism.G. Anthony Bruno - 2020 - In Idealism, Relativism and Realism: New Essays on Objectivity Beyond the Analytic-Continental Divide. Berlin:
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  22. Skepticism: Historical and Contemporary Inquiries.G. Anthony Bruno & A. C. Rutherford (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Skepticism is one of the most enduring and profound of philosophical problems. With its roots in Plato and the Sceptics to Descartes, Hume, Kant and Wittgenstein, skepticism presents a challenge that every philosopher must reckon with. In this outstanding collection philosophers engage with skepticism in five clear sections: the philosophical history of skepticism in Greek, Cartesian and Kantian thought; the nature and limits of certainty; the possibility of knowledge and related problems such as perception and the debates between objective knowledge (...)
  23. Epistemic Reciprocity in Schelling's Late Return to Kant.G. Anthony Bruno - 2015 - In Pablo Muchnik (ed.), Rethinking Kant (volume 4). Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 75-94.
    In his 1841-2 Berlin lectures, Schelling critiques German idealism’s negative method of regressing from existence to its first principle, which is supposed to be intelligible without remainder. He sees existence as precisely its remainder since there could be nothing that exists. To solve this, Schelling enlists the positive method of progressing from the fact of existence to a proof of this principle’s reality. Since this proof faces the absurdity that there is anything rather than nothing, he concludes that this fact’s (...)
     
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  24. Hiatus Irrationalis: Lask’s Fateful Misreading of Fichte.G. Anthony Bruno - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):977-995.
    ‘Facticity’ is a concept that classical phenomenologists like Heidegger use to denote the radically contingent or underivably brute conditions of intelligibility. Yet Fichte coins the term, to which he gives the opposing use of denoting unacceptably brute conditions of intelligibility. For him, radical contingency is a problem to be solved by deriving such conditions from reason. Heidegger rejects Fichte's recoil from facticity with his hermeneutics of facticity, supplanting Fichte's metaphor of our always being in reason's hand with the metaphor of (...)
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  25. A Peculiar Fate: The Unity of Human life in Kant and Heidegger.G. Anthony Bruno - 2014 - Dialogue 53 (4):715-735.
    It is commonly held that nature is knowable in itself and that death has no explanatory priority in knowing nature. I reject both claims as they undermine an account of the unity of human life, failing, respectively, to thematize the limitations of finite understanding and to acknowledge what’s most certain about finite existence. I use Kant’s idea of the thing in itself and Heidegger’s idea of death to solve two structurally analogous antinomies these failures leave intact. I conclude that to (...)
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  26. Jacobi’s Dare: McDowell, Meillassoux, and Consistent Idealism.G. Anthony Bruno - 2020 - In Dominik Finkelde & Paul M. Livingston (eds.), Idealism, Relativism, and Realism: New Essays on Objectivity Beyond the Analytic-Continental Divide. De Gruyter. pp. 35-56.
    Does Kant’s restriction of knowledge to phenomena undermine objectivity? Jacobi argues that it does, daring the transcendental idealist to abandon the thing in itself and embrace the “strongest idealism”. According to Bruno, McDowell and Meillassoux adopt a similar critique of Kant’s conception of objectivity and, more significantly, echo Jacobi’s dare to profess the strongest idealism – what McDowell approvingly calls “consistent idealism” and Meillassoux disparagingly calls “extreme idealism”. After exposing the Cartesian projection on which Jacobi’s critique rests, Bruno shows that (...)
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  27. Schelling’s Philosophy: Freedom, Nature, and Systematicity.G. Anthony Bruno (ed.) - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    Despite F. W. J. Schelling’s relative exclusion from the ongoing German idealist renaissance in Anglophone scholarship, recent critical and historical engagement with idealist texts affords an unprecedented opportunity to discover the richness and value of his thinking. This volume provides a wide-ranging presentation of Schelling’s original contribution to and internal critique of the basic insights of German idealism, his role in shaping the course of post-Kantian thought, and his sensitivity and innovative responses to questions of lasting metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, aesthetic, (...)
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  28. Varieties of Transcendental Idealism: Kant and Heidegger Thinking Beyond Life.G. Anthony Bruno - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (1):81-102.
    In recent work, William Blattner claims that Heidegger is an empirical realist, but not a transcendental idealist. Blattner argues that, unlike Kant, Heidegger holds that thinking beyond human life warrants no judgment about nature's existence. This poses two problems. One is interpretive: Blattner misreads Kant's conception of the beyond-life as yielding the judgment that nature does not exist, for Kant shares Heidegger's view that such a judgment must lack sense. Another is programmatic: Blattner overstates the gap between Kant's and Heidegger's (...)
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  29. Meillassoux, Correlationism, and the Ontological Difference.G. Anthony Bruno - 2018 - PhaenEx 12 (2):1-12.
    Meillassoux defines “correlationism” as the view that we can only access the mutual dependence of thought and being—specifically, subjectivity and objectivity—which he attributes to Heidegger. This attribution is inapt. It is only by accessing being—via existential analysis—that we can properly distinguish beings like subjects and objects. I propose that Meillassoux’s misattribution ignores the ontological difference that drives Heidegger’s project. First, I demonstrate the inadequacy of Meillassoux’s account of correlationism as a criticism of Heidegger and dispense with an objection. Second, I (...)
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  30. Schelling on the Possibility of Evil: Rendering Pantheism, Freedom, and Time Consistent.G. Anthony Bruno - 2017 - SATS 18 (1):1-18.
    German idealism stems in large part from Fichte’s response to a dilemma involving the concepts of pantheism, freedom and time: either time is the form of the determination of modes of substance, as held by a pantheistic or ‘dogmatic’ person, or the form of acts generated by human freedom, as held by an idealistic person. Fichte solves the dilemma by refuting dogmatism and deducing time from idealism’s first principle. But his diagnosis is more portentous: by casting the lemmas in terms (...)
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  31. Aesthetic Value, Intersubjectivity and the Absolute Conception of the World.G. Anthony Bruno - 2009 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 6 (3).
    In the Critique of the Power of Judgment, Kant diagnoses an antinomy of taste: either determinate concepts exhaust judgments of taste or they do not. That is to say, judgments of taste are either objective and public or subjective and private. On the objectivity thesis, aesthetic value is predicable of objects. But determining the concepts that would make a judgment of taste objective is a vexing matter. Who can say which concepts these would be? To what authority does one appeal? (...)
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  32.  19
    Erratum to: For the Love of Metaphysics: Nihilism and the Conflict of Reason from Kant to Rosenzweig, by Karin Nisenbaum.G. Anthony Bruno - 2022 - Mind 131 (522):743-743.
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  33. Gauging Schelling’s Late Return to Kant.G. Anthony Bruno - 2011 - Juventas: Zeitschrift für Junge Philosophie 1 (2):118-39.
  34. Idealism, Relativism and Realism: New Essays on Objectivity Beyond the Analytic-Continental Divide.G. Anthony Bruno - forthcoming
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  35. Philosophy's Collision with the Corpse.G. Anthony Bruno - 2011 - Juventas Zeitschrift für Junge Philosophie 1 (1).
    If we accept the Socratic edict that the examined life is the only worth living, we find no examination can exclude that mortal fate of human life. If we define a philosophical problem as, in Hans Jonas’ words, “the collision between a comprehensive view (be it hypothesis or belief) and a particular fact which will not fit into it”, we see there can be no greater problem for materialism or organicism than the corpse. That living things die is a problem (...)
     
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  36. Parallax: The Dependence of Reality on its Subjective Constitution.G. Anthony Bruno - forthcoming
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  37. Schelling’s Question Quid Juris.G. Anthony Bruno - forthcoming - In Sean McGrath & Kyla Bruff (eds.), The Palgrave Schelling Handbook. Palgrave.
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  38.  28
    The Bounds of Justification.G. Anthony Bruno - 2007 - Dissertation, Queen's University
    Thesis (Master, Philosophy) -- Queen's University, 2007-09-28 11:57:18.196.
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    The Bounds of Life: The Role of Death in Schelling's Internal Critique of German Idealism.G. Anthony Bruno - 2013 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    What conditions the possibility of existentially valuable experience? Against nihilism, the threat that philosophical cognition undermines the very idea of purposiveness, German idealism posits that we are unconditionally conditioned by life, construed as the infinite purposive activity of reason. I reconstruct Schelling’s critique of this project as defending the idea that death conditions or puts into question our rational activity. Scholars tend to read the idealists as rejecting Kant’s idea of an unknowable thing in itself by grounding philosophy on a (...)
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  40. Fichte and the Primacy of Practical Reason.G. Anthony Bruno - forthcoming - In Jeffery Kinlaw (ed.), Fichte’s Doctrine of Scientific Knowledge: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  41. Rationalism.G. Anthony Bruno - forthcoming - Jacobi Online Dictionary.
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  42. Facticity and the Fate of Reason After Kant.G. Anthony Bruno - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    Kant’s science of the conditions of intelligibility leaves post-Kantians with a question: can a science of intelligibility tolerate brute facts? ‘Facticity’ is associated with phenomenology, for which the concept denotes underivable or brute conditions of intelligibility like temporality, sociality, and embodiment. While this suggests an affirmative answer to the post-Kantian question, scholars overlook that ‘facticity’ is a concept from German idealism, whose proponents answer the question in the negative. Fichte coins ‘facticity’ to denote the intolerable bruteness of conditions that are (...)
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  43. Review of Interpreting Schelling: Critical Essays, ed. Lara Ostaric. [REVIEW]G. Anthony Bruno - 2016 - Critique 1 (x).
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  44. Review of Kant’s Critique of Spinoza, Omri Boehm. [REVIEW]G. Anthony Bruno - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1 (x).
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  45.  67
    Review of Reason and Conversion in Kierkegaard and the German Idealists, Ryan S. Kemp and Christopher Iacovetti. [REVIEW]G. Anthony Bruno - 2022 - Kantian Review 27 (1):169-173.
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    Review of For the Love of Metaphysics: Nihilism and the Conflict of Reason from Kant to Rosenzweig, Karin Nisenbaum. [REVIEW]G. Anthony Bruno - 2022 - Mind 1.
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