30 found
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  1. Meno. Plato & G. M. A. Grube - 1976 - Hackett Publishing.
    "Fine translation, good notes - inexpensive, too!" -- D A Rohatyn, University of San Diego.
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  2. Plato's Thought.G. M. A. Grube - 1971 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 33 (4):779-779.
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  3.  58
    The Structural Unity of the Protagoras.G. M. A. Grube - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (3-4):203-.
    To speak of ‘the real subject’ or ‘the primary aim’ of a Platonic dialogue usually means to magnify one aspect of it at the expense of other aspects as important. Such is not my intention. It is quite clear, however, without prejudice to the philosophic value of any of the topics discussed, that the Protagoras is an attack upon the sophists as represented by Protagoras, the greatest of them. Hippias and Prodicus are present and some of the great man's glory (...)
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  4. Plato's Theory of Beauty.G. M. A. Grube - 1927 - The Monist 37 (2):269-288.
  5.  38
    On the Authenticity of the Hippias Maior.G. M. A. Grube - 1926 - Classical Quarterly 20 (3-4):134-.
    Grote's powerful defence of Thrasyllus' canon should have taught us at least not to reject lightly any dialogue which, like the Hippias Maior, is there classed as genuine. The burden of proof lies with those who attack our dialogue. Raeder, Ritter, and Apelt consider it to be genuine, while Ast, Jowett, Horneffer, and Röllig declare against it, as also Gomperz, Zeller, and Lutoslawski.
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  6.  8
    The Structural Unity of the Protagoras.G. M. A. Grube - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (3-4):203-207.
    To speak of ‘the real subject’ or ‘the primary aim’ of a Platonic dialogue usually means to magnify one aspect of it at the expense of other aspects as important. Such is not my intention. It is quite clear, however, without prejudice to the philosophic value of any of the topics discussed, that the Protagoras is an attack upon the sophists as represented by Protagoras, the greatest of them. Hippias and Prodicus are present and some of the great man's glory (...)
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  7.  24
    Meno. Plato & G. M. A. Grube - 1949 - New York: Liberal Arts Press.
    Plato's Meno and Phaedo are two of the most important works of ancient western philosophy and continue to be studied around the world. The Meno is a seminal work of epistemology. The Phaedo is a key source for Platonic metaphysics and for Plato's conception of the human soul. Together they illustrate the birth of Platonic philosophy from Plato's reflections on Socrates' life and doctrines. This edition offers new and accessible translations of both works, together with a thorough introduction that explains (...)
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  8.  16
    The Greek and Roman Critics.Michael Winterbottom & G. M. A. Grube - 1966 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 86:204-205.
  9.  2
    Plato's Thought.Harold Cherniss & G. M. A. Grube - 1936 - American Journal of Philology 57 (4):480.
  10.  2
    Paideia, the Ideals of Greek Culture.G. M. A. Grube & Werner Jaeger - 1947 - American Journal of Philology 68 (2):200.
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  11.  2
    The Homeric Gods.G. M. A. Grube, Walter F. Otto & Moses Hadas - 1956 - American Journal of Philology 77 (3):331.
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  12.  23
    Plato: Phaedo.David Gallop & G. M. A. Grube - 1978 - Noûs 12 (4):475-479.
  13.  9
    On the Authenticity of the Hippias Maior.G. M. A. Grube - 1926 - Classical Quarterly 20 (3-4):134-148.
    Grote's powerful defence of Thrasyllus' canon should have taught us at least not to reject lightly any dialogue which, like the Hippias Maior, is there classed as genuine. The burden of proof lies with those who attack our dialogue. Raeder, Ritter, and Apelt consider it to be genuine, while Ast, Jowett, Horneffer, and Röllig declare against it, as also Gomperz, Zeller, and Lutoslawski.
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  14. Blaiklock, The Male Characters of Euripides.G. M. A. Grube - 1952 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 46:183.
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  15. Blaiklock, The Male Characters of Euripides.G. M. A. Grube - 1952 - Classical Weekly 46:183.
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  16. On Poetry and Style.G. M. A. Grube - 1959 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 14 (2):205-205.
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  17.  1
    The Meditations.G. M. A. Grube (ed.) - 1983 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Contents include a translator's introduction, selected bibliography, note on the text, glossary of technical terms, biographical index, and The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius -- books 1-12.
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  18. Zeus in Aeschylus.G. M. A. Grube - 1970 - American Journal of Philology 91 (1):43.
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  19.  41
    Notes on the Hippias Maior.G. M. A. Grube - 1926 - The Classical Review 40 (06):188-189.
  20.  5
    Xenophontisches Und Platonisches Bild des Sokrates.G. M. A. Grube & Emma Edelstein - 1937 - American Journal of Philology 58 (2):243.
  21.  3
    La Religion de Platon.G. M. A. Grube & Victor Goldschmidt - 1951 - American Journal of Philology 72 (2):212.
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  22.  3
    Theodorus of Gadara.G. M. A. Grube - 1959 - American Journal of Philology 80 (4):337.
  23.  10
    The Marriage Laws in Plato's Republic.G. M. A. Grube - 1927 - Classical Quarterly 21 (2):95-99.
    The difficult and apparently inconsistent regulations by which certain marriages are forbidden in the Republic have not, it would seem, been consistently explained hitherto. It is the purpose of this article to prove that—if we read Plato's text without prejudice—marriages between brothers and sisters are nowhere prohibited, but expressly allowed; and that there are in the ideal city certain family groups, though I do not contend that any very great importance is to be attached to these.
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  24.  11
    Plato's ThoughtsGreek Ideals and Modern LifeThe Political Philosophies of Plato and Hegel.G. M. Y., G. M. A. Grube, R. W. Livingstone & M. B. Foster - 1936 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 56:110.
  25.  2
    L'Oraison Funebre de Gorgias.G. M. A. Grube & W. Vollgraff - 1954 - American Journal of Philology 75 (3):334.
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  26.  2
    Notes on the Peri Hupsous.G. M. A. Grube - 1957 - American Journal of Philology 78 (4):355.
  27.  2
    A Greek Critic: Demetrius on Style.George Kennedy & G. M. A. Grube - 1963 - American Journal of Philology 84 (3):313.
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  28.  7
    A Greek Critic: Demetrius on Style.S. F. Bonner, Demetrius & G. M. A. Grube - 1963 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 83:171-172.
  29.  1
    Thrasymachus, Theophrastus, and Dionysius of Halicarnassus.G. M. A. Grube - 1952 - American Journal of Philology 73 (3):251.
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  30.  1
    The Greek and Roman Critics.Marsh McCall & G. M. A. Grube - 1967 - American Journal of Philology 88 (2):251.
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