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Greg Moorlock [7]G. Moorlock [3]
  1.  19
    Influencing Relatives to Respect Donor Autonomy: Should We Nudge Families to Consent to Organ Donation?Adnan Sharif & Greg Moorlock - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):155-163.
    Refusing consent to organ donation remains unacceptably high, and improving consent rates from family or next-of-kin is an important step to procuring more organs for solid organ transplantation in countries where this approval is sought. We have thus far failed to translate fully our limited understanding of why families refuse permission into successful strategies targeting consent in the setting of deceased organ donation, primarily because our interventions fail to target underlying cognitive obstacles. Novel interventions to overcome these hurdles, incorporating an (...)
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  2.  9
    Altruism in Organ Donation: An Unnecessary Requirement?G. Moorlock, J. Ives & H. Draper - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):134-138.
    Altruism has long been taken to be the guiding principle of ethical organ donation in the UK, and has been used as justification for rejecting or allowing certain types of donation. We argue that, despite this prominent role, altruism has been poorly defined in policy and position documents, and used confusingly and inconsistently. Looking at how the term has been used over recent years allows us to define ‘organ donation altruism’, and comparing this with accounts in the philosophical literature highlights (...)
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  3.  40
    Liver Transplantation Using 'Donation After Circulatory Death' Donors: The Ethics of Managing the End-of-Life Care of Potential Donors to Achieve Organs Suitable for Transplantation.G. Moorlock, H. Draper & S. R. Bramhall - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (3):134-139.
    The decline in organs donated after brain death has been countered by an increase in organs donated after circulatory death. Organs donated after circulatory death present an increased risk of complications for their eventual recipients when compared with organs donated after brain death, so the likelihood of successful transplantation is decreased. If organ donation is considered to be in the best interests of the patient, interventions that facilitate successful donation and transplantation might be permissible. This paper seeks to establish whether (...)
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  4.  3
    Pre-Mortem Interventions for Donation After Circulatory Death and Overall Benefit: A Qualitative Study.Aisha Gathani, Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - 2016 - Clinical Ethics 11 (4):149-158.
    This article explores how the type of consent given for organ donation should affect the judgement of a patient's overall benefit with regards to donation of their organs and the pre-mortem interventions required to facilitate this. The findings of a qualitative study of the views of 10 healthcare professionals, combined with a philosophical analysis inform the conclusion that how consent to organ donation is given is a reliable indicator only of the strength of evidence about views on donation and subsequent (...)
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  5.  1
    Empathy, Social Media, and Directed Altruistic Living Organ Donation.Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):289-297.
    In this article we explore some of the ethical dimensions of using social media to increase the number of living kidney donors. Social media provides a platform for changing non-identifiable ‘statistical victims’ into ‘real people’ with whom we can identify and feel empathy: the so-called ‘identifiable victim effect’, which prompts charitable action. We examine three approaches to promoting kidney donation using social media which could take advantages of the identifiable victim effect: institutionally organized campaigns based on historical cases aimed at (...)
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  6.  2
    An Empirically Informed Analysis of the Ethical Issues Surrounding Split Liver Transplantation in the United Kingdom.Greg Moorlock, James Neuberger, Simon Bramhall & Heather Draper - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):435-447.
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  7.  11
    Directed Altruistic Living Donation: What is Wrong with the Beauty Contest?Greg Moorlock - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):875-879.
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  8.  1
    An Empirically Informed Analysis of the Ethical Issues Surrounding Split Liver Transplantation in the United Kingdom.Greg Moorlock, James Neuberger, Simon Bramhall & Heather Draper - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):435-447.
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  9.  5
    Should We Reject Donated Organs on Moral Grounds or Permit Allocation Using Non‐Medical Criteria?: A Qualitative Study.Greg Moorlock, Jonathan Ives, Simon Bramhall & Heather Draper - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):282-292.
    Conditional and directed deceased organ donations occur when donors attempt to influence the allocation of their donated organs. This can include asking that the organs are given to or withheld from certain types of people, or that they are given to specified individuals. Donations of these types have raised ethical concerns, and have been prohibited in many countries, including the UK. In this article we report the findings from a qualitative study involving interviews with potential donors, potential recipients and transplant (...)
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  10.  1
    Split Liver Transplantation: Papering Over the Cracks of the Organ Shortage.G. Moorlock, J. Neuberger & H. Draper - 2015 - Clinical Ethics 10 (3):83-89.
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