Results for 'G. Pitts'

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  1. 'Peirce-pectives' on Metaphysics and the Sciences.Susan Haack, Rosa Mayorga, Jaime Nubiola, Cornelis de Waal, Deborah G. Mayo, Robert G. Meyers, Joseph C. Pitt & Nicholas Rescher - 2005 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (2):237-365.
     
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  2. Is auditory word recognition serial or interactive.M. A. Pitt & A. G. Samuel - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):502-502.
     
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  3.  12
    Metal-insulator transition in NiS2.J. A. Wilson & G. D. Pitt - 1971 - Philosophical Magazine 23 (186):1297-1310.
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  4.  27
    Value Congruence Awareness: Part 2. DNA Testing Sheds Light on Functionalism.Robert G. Isaac, L. Kim Wilson & Douglas C. Pitt - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (3):297-309.
    Part 1 of this exploratory study demonstrated that for terminal, instrumental, and work values, supervisors could only accurately assess the extent to which their terminal values are congruent with their employees, whereas, employees could only accurately describe degrees of alignment with their supervisors' work values. Thus, supervisors appear to possess conscious awareness of the terminal values held by their employees and employees similarly possess conscious awareness of their supervisors' work values. Part 2 of the study examined what each of these (...)
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  5.  40
    Mechanisms of unconscious priming: Response competition, not spreading activation.M. R. Klinger, P. Burton & G. Pitts - 2000 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (2):441-455.
  6.  6
    What Are Observables in Hamiltonian Einstein–Maxwell Theory?James Pitts - 2019 - Foundations of Physics 49 (8):786-796.
    Is change missing in Hamiltonian Einstein–Maxwell theory? Given the most common definition of observables, observables are constants of the motion and nonlocal. Unfortunately this definition also implies that the observables for massive electromagnetism with gauge freedom are inequivalent to those of massive electromagnetism without gauge freedom. The alternative Pons–Salisbury–Sundermeyer definition of observables, aiming for Hamiltonian–Lagrangian equivalence, uses the gauge generator G, a tuned sum of first-class constraints, rather than each first-class constraint separately, and implies equivalent observables for equivalent massive electromagnetisms. (...)
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  7.  26
    Equivalent Theories and Changing Hamiltonian Observables in General Relativity.J. Brian Pitts - 2018 - Foundations of Physics 48 (5):579-590.
    Change and local spatial variation are missing in Hamiltonian general relativity according to the most common definition of observables as having 0 Poisson bracket with all first-class constraints. But other definitions of observables have been proposed. In pursuit of Hamiltonian–Lagrangian equivalence, Pons, Salisbury and Sundermeyer use the Anderson–Bergmann–Castellani gauge generator G, a tuned sum of first-class constraints. Kuchař waived the 0 Poisson bracket condition for the Hamiltonian constraint to achieve changing observables. A systematic combination of the two reforms might use (...)
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  8.  86
    Change in Hamiltonian general relativity from the lack of a time-like Killing vector field.J. Brian Pitts - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 47:68-89.
    In General Relativity in Hamiltonian form, change has seemed to be missing, defined only asymptotically, or otherwise obscured at best, because the Hamiltonian is a sum of first-class constraints and a boundary term and thus supposedly generates gauge transformations. Attention to the gauge generator G of Rosenfeld, Anderson, Bergmann, Castellani et al., a specially _tuned sum_ of first-class constraints, facilitates seeing that a solitary first-class constraint in fact generates not a gauge transformation, but a bad physical change in electromagnetism or (...)
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  9.  16
    Equivalent Theories Redefine Hamiltonian Observables to Exhibit Change in General Relativity.J. Brian Pitts - unknown
    Change and local spatial variation are missing in canonical General Relativity's observables as usually defined, an aspect of the problem of time. Definitions can be tested using equivalent formulations of a theory, non-gauge and gauge, because they must have equivalent observables and everything is observable in the non-gauge formulation. Taking an observable from the non-gauge formulation and finding the equivalent in the gauge formulation, one requires that the equivalent be an observable, thus constraining definitions. For massive photons, the de Broglie-Proca (...)
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  10. G. Felicitas Munzel, Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The'Critical'Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment Reviewed by.Frederick P. Van De Pitte - 2000 - Philosophy in Review 20 (2):137-139.
  11. G. palm1.Warren McCulloch, Walter Pitts & A. Logical - 1986 - In G. Palm & A. Aertsen (eds.), Brain Theory. Springer. pp. 229.
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  12.  18
    What Are Observables in Hamiltonian Theories? Testing Definitions with Empirical Equivalence.J. Brian Pitts - unknown
    Change seems missing in Hamiltonian General Relativity's observables. The typical definition takes observables to have $0$ Poisson bracket with \emph{each} first-class constraint. Another definition aims to recover Lagrangian-equivalence: observables have $0$ Poisson bracket with the gauge generator $G$, a \emph{tuned sum} of first-class constraints. Empirically equivalent theories have equivalent observables. That platitude provides a test of definitions using de Broglie's massive electromagnetism. The non-gauge ``Proca'' formulation has no first-class constraints, so everything is observable. The gauge ``Stueckelberg'' formulation has first-class constraints, (...)
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  13.  49
    A First Class Constraint Generates Not a Gauge Transformation, But a Bad Physical Change: The Case of Electromagnetism.J. Brian Pitts - unknown
    In Dirac-Bergmann constrained dynamics, a first-class constraint typically does not _alone_ generate a gauge transformation. By direct calculation it is found that each first-class constraint in Maxwell's theory generates a change in the electric field E by an arbitrary gradient, spoiling Gauss's law. The secondary first-class constraint p^i,_i=0 still holds, but being a function of derivatives of momenta, it is not directly about E. Only a special combination of the two first-class constraints, the Anderson-Bergmann -Castellani gauge generator G, leaves E (...)
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  14.  26
    What represents space-time? And what follows for substantivalism vs. relationalism and gravitational energy?J. Brian Pitts - 2022 - In Antonio Vassallo (ed.), The Foundations of Spacetime Physics: Philosophical Perspectives. New York, NY: Routledge.
    The questions of what represents space-time in GR, the status of gravitational energy, the substantivalist-relationalist issue, and the exceptional status of gravity are interrelated. If space-time has energy-momentum, then space-time is substantival. Two extant ways to avoid the substantivalist conclusion deny that the energy-bearing metric is part of space-time or deny that gravitational energy exists. Feynman linked doubts about gravitational energy to GR-exceptionalism, as do Curiel and Duerr; particle physics egalitarianism encourages realism about gravitational energy. In that spirit, this essay (...)
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  15. PITT-RIVERS, G. -Conscience and Fanaticism: an Essay on Moral Values. [REVIEW]G. G. G. G. - 1920 - Mind 29:243.
     
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  16.  13
    Change in Hamiltonian General Relativity with Spinors.J. Brian Pitts - 2021 - Foundations of Physics 51 (6):1-30.
    In General Relativity in Hamiltonian form, change has seemed to be missing, defined only asymptotically, or otherwise obscured at best, because the Hamiltonian is a sum of first-class constraints and a boundary term and thus supposedly generates gauge transformations. By construing change as essential time dependence, one can find change locally in vacuum GR in the Hamiltonian formulation just where it should be. But what if spinors are present? This paper is motivated by the tendency in space-time philosophy tends to (...)
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  17. Edmund J. Thomas and Eugene G. Miller, Writers and Philosophers: A Sourcebook of Philosophical Influences on Literature Reviewed by.M. M. Van de Pitte - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (5):369-370.
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  18.  12
    The Order of Magnitude: Why SNARC‐like Tasks (Still) Cannot Support a Generalized Magnitude System.Benjamin Pitt & Daniel Casasanto - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (2):e13108.
    According to proponents of the generalized magnitude system proposal (GMS), SNARC-like effects index spatial mappings of magnitude and provide crucial evidence for the existence of a GMS. Casasanto and Pitt (2019) have argued that these effects, instead, reflect mappings of ordinality, which people compute on the basis of differences among stimuli that vary either qualitatively (e.g., musical pitches) or quantitatively (e.g., dots of different sizes). In response to our paper, Prpic et al. (2021) argued that both magnitude and ordinality play (...)
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  19. Absolute objects, counterexamples and general covariance.J. Brian Pitts - unknown
    The Anderson-Friedman absolute objects program has been a favorite analysis of the substantive general covariance that supposedly characterizes Einstein's General Theory of Relativity (GTR). Absolute objects are the same locally in all models (modulo gauge freedom). Substantive general covariance is the lack of absolute objects. Several counterexamples have been proposed, however, including the Jones-Geroch dust and Torretti constant curvature spaces counterexamples. The Jones-Geroch dust case, ostensibly a false positive, is resolved by noting that holes in the dust in some models (...)
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  20. Trans Philosophy: Meaning and Mattering.Talia Bettcher, Perry Zurn, Andrea Pitts & P. J. DiPietro (eds.) - forthcoming - University of Minnesota Press.
    Trans Philosophy: Meaning and Mattering will be the first authoritative collection to establish trans philosophy as a unique field of inquiry. It defines trans philosophy as philosophical work that is accountable to and illuminative of transgender experiences, histories, cultural production, and politics. The book will showcase work from a range of fresh and established voices in this nascent field. It will address a variety of topics (e.g. embodiment, identity, language, law, politics, transphobia), utilize diverse philosophical methods (e.g. analytic, continental, and (...)
     
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  21.  19
    The historical dimensions of a rational faith.Frederick P. Van de Pitte - 1980 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (4):482-483.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:482 HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY G. E. Michalson, Jr. TheHistoricalDimensions ofaRattonalFaith. Washington, D.C.: University Press of America, 1977. Pp. 222. $8.65. The primary intentionof this work is to argue that historical or ecclesiastical religion plays a vital role in Kant's religious thought, because it is necessary to provide a sensible content for the purely formal doctrine of Kant's "moral" religion. But Michalson resists that this strategy cannot succeed, because of (...)
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  22.  27
    Warren McCulloch and Walter Pitts: A Logical Calculus of the Ideas Immanent in Nervous Activity.G. Palm - 1986 - In G. Palm & A. Aertsen (eds.), Brain Theory. Springer. pp. 229--230.
  23. Selected Writings.Stephen G. Engelmann (ed.) - 2011 - Yale University Press.
    Jeremy Bentham, philosopher and reformer, is one of the most influential thinkers of the modern age. This introduction to his writings presents a representative selection of texts authoritatively restored by the Bentham Project, University College London. As well as more familiar pieces on utility, law, and politics/policy, highlights include the succinct essay “On Retrenchment” and a never-before-published treatise on sex. The volume is completed by major interpretative essays by Mark Canuel, David Lieberman, Jennifer Pitts, and Philip Schofield. The texts (...)
     
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  24.  33
    The Relevance of History to Philosophy of Science.Robert G. Hudson - 2006 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 21 (2):197-212.
    My task in this paper is to defend the legitimacy of historicist philosophy of science, defined as the philosophic study of science that takes seriously case studies drawn from the practice of science. Historicistphilosophy of science suffers from what I call the ’evidence problem’. The worry is that case studies cannot qualify as rigorous evidence for the adjudication of philosophic theories. I explore the reasons why one might deny to historical cases a probative value, then reply to these reasons on (...)
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  25.  37
    Andrew M. Pitts. Interpolation and conceptual completeness for pretoposes via category theory. Mathematical logic and theoretical computer science, edited by Kueker David W., Lopez-Escobar Edgar G. K. and Smith Carl H., Lecture notes in pure and applied mathematics, vol. 106, Marcel Dekker, New York and Basel1987, pp. 301–327. - Andrew M. Pitts. Conceptual completeness for first-order intuitionistic logic: an application of categorical logic. Annals of pure and applied logic, vol. 41 , pp. 33–81. [REVIEW]Marek Zawadowski - 1995 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 60 (2):692-694.
  26.  26
    Review: Andrew M. Pitts, David W. Kueker, Edgar G. K. Lopez-Escobar, Carl H. Smith, Interpolation and Conceptual Completeness for Pretoposes via Category Theory; Andrew M. Pitts, Conceptual Completeness for First-order Intutionistic Logic: An Application of Categorical Logic. [REVIEW]Marek Zawadowski - 1995 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 60 (2):692-694.
  27.  52
    Stephenson's Sixth Book of Livy - Livy, Book VI. with Introduction and Notes, by H. M. Stephenson, M.A. Pitt Press Series. 2 s_. G _d[REVIEW]John C. Rolfe - 1893 - The Classical Review 7 (06):272-273.
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  28.  56
    Titi Livi Ab Urbe Condita Libri. Editionem primam curavit G. Weissenborn. Editio altera quam curavit Mauritius Müller. Pars. IV. Fase. I. Lib. XXXI.—XXXV. Lipsiae, in Aedibus B. G. Teubneri. - Titi Livi ab Urbe Condita Liber V. Für den Schulgebrauch erklärt von Franz Luterbacher. Leipzig. B. G. Teubner. 1 Mk. 20. - Livy. Book XXI. Edited for the Syndics of the University Press, by M. S. Dimsdale, M.A., Fellow of King's College, Cambridge. Pitt Press series. 3s. Sd. [REVIEW]H. M. Stephenson - 1888 - The Classical Review 2 (07):213-214.
  29.  31
    The Iliad of Homer, Book xxiii. With Introduction, Notes, and Appendices, by G. M. Edwards, M. A., Fellow and Tutor of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge. Pitt Press, 1891. 2 s[REVIEW]Arthur Platt - 1891 - The Classical Review 5 (10):476-477.
  30. Recurrent Processing Theory (RPT) v. Global Neuronal Workspace Theory (GNWT). A comment on Pitts et al 2018.Carlos Montemayor & Harry Haladjian - 2019 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 374.
    The relationship between attention and consciousness is one that is crucial for understanding perception and different types of conscious experience, and we commend this analysis of the topic by Pitts, Lutsyshyna, and Hillyard (2018). We have also examined this relationship closely (e.g., Montemayor & Haladjian, 2015) and would like to point out a few potential contradictions in the Pitts et al. paper that require clarification, particularly in the attempt to reconcile aspects of recurrent processing theory (RPT) with global (...)
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  31. Desire: Its Role in Practical Reason and the Explanation of Action.G. F. Schueler - 1995 - MIT Press.
    Does action always arise out of desire? G. F. Schueler examines this hotly debated topic in philosophy of action and moral philosophy, arguing that once two senses of "desire" are distinguished - roughly, genuine desires and pro attitudes - apparently plausible explanations of action in terms of the agent's desires can be seen to be mistaken. Desire probes a fundamental issue in philosophy of mind, the nature of desires and how, if at all, they motivate and justify our actions. At (...)
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  32. The refutation of idealism.G. E. Moore - 1903 - Mind 12 (48):433-453.
  33. The intentionality of sensation: A grammatical feature.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1962 - In Ronald Joseph Butler (ed.), Analytic Philosophy. Oxford, England: Blackwell. pp. 158-80.
  34.  68
    Toward a Model of Functional Brain Processes I: Central Nervous System Functional Micro-architecture.Mark H. Bickhard - 2015 - Axiomathes 25 (3):217-238.
    Standard semantic information processing models—information in; information processed; information out —lend themselves to standard models of the functioning of the brain in terms, e.g., of threshold-switch neurons connected via classical synapses. That is, in terms of sophisticated descendants of McCulloch and Pitts models. I argue that both the cognition and the brain sides of this framework are incorrect: cognition and thought are not constituted as forms of semantic information processing, and the brain does not function in terms of passive (...)
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  35. The first person.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1975 - In Samuel D. Guttenplan (ed.), Mind and language. Oxford [Eng.]: Clarendon Press. pp. 45–65.
     
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  36.  52
    Doing philosophy historically.Peter H. Hare (ed.) - 1988 - Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Books.
    Can original philosophy be done while simultaneously engaging in the history of philosophy? Such a possibility is questioned by analytic philosophers who contend that history contaminates good philosophy, and by historians of philosophy who insist that theoretical predecessors cannot be ignored. Believing that both camps are misguided, the contributors to this book present a case for historical philosophy as a valuable enterprise. The contributors include: Todd L. Adams, Lilli Alanen, Jos? Bernardete, Jonathan Bennett, John I. Biro, Phillip Cummins, Georges Dicker, (...)
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  37.  37
    Materialism and mentality.G. D. Wassermann - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (4):715-30.
    MATERIALISTS claim that in principle mentality could be accounted for entirely by properties of matter. They must, of course, clarify, as far as possible, the precise scope of the concept "properties of matter." According to materialists there exists only one type of "substance" in the universe, namely matter. Sophisticated experimental and theoretical analyses have led contemporary physicists to interpret known material entities as being composed of two classes of elementary particles, namely quarks and leptons and constituents of interaction fields that (...)
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  38. Realism and Anti-Realism about experiences of understanding.Jordan Dodd - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (3):745-767.
    Strawson (1994) and Peacocke (1992) introduced thought experiments that show that it seems intuitive that there is, in some way, an experiential character to mental events of understanding. Some (e.g., Siewert 1998, 2011; Pitt 2004) try to explain these intuitions by saying that just as we have, say, headache experiences and visual experiences of blueness, so too we have experiences of understanding. Others (e.g., Prinz 2006, 2011; Tye 1996) propose that these intuitions can be explained without positing experiences of understanding. (...)
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  39. Freedom of the will and the concept of a person.Harry G. Frankfurt - 1971 - Journal of Philosophy 68 (1):5-20.
    It is my view that one essential difference between persons and other creatures is to be found in the structure of a person's will. Besides wanting and choosing and being moved to do this or that, men may also want to have certain desires and motives. They are capable of wanting to be different, in their preferences and purposes, from what they are. Many animals appear to have the capacity for what I shall call "first-order desires" or "desires of the (...)
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  40.  64
    Self, Language, and World: Problems from Kant, Sellars, and Rosenberg.James R. O'Shea & Eric M. Rubenstein (eds.) - 2010 - Ridgeview Publishing Co..
    Self, Language, and World: Problems from Kant, Sellars, and Rosenberg Edited by James R. O'Shea and Eric M. Rubenstein Introduction KANT Willem deVries, Kant, Rosenberg, and the Mirror of Philosophy David Landy, The Premise That Even Hume Must Accept LANGUAGE AND MIND William G. Lycan, Rosenberg On Proper Names Douglas Long, Why Life is Necessary for Mind: The Significance of Animate Behavior Dorit Bar-On and Mitchell Green, Lionspeak: Communication, Expression, and Meaning David Rosenthal, The Mind and Its Expression MIND AND (...)
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  41.  23
    Is Emotional Magnitude Spatialized? A Further Investigation.Kevin J. Holmes, Candelaria Alcat & Stella F. Lourenco - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (4):e12727.
    Accumulating evidence suggests that different magnitudes (e.g., number, size, and duration) are spatialized in the mind according to a common left–right metric, consistent with a generalized system for representing magnitude. A previous study conducted by two of us (Holmes & Lourenco, ) provided evidence that this metric extends to the processing of emotional magnitude, or the intensity of emotion expressed in faces. Recently, however, Pitt and Casasanto () showed that the earlier effects may have been driven by a left–right mapping (...)
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  42.  42
    Biological and cultural evolution: Similar but different.Alex Mesoudi - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (2):119-123.
    Ever since The Origin of Species, but increasingly in recent years, parallels and analogies have been drawn between biological and cultural evolution, and methods, concepts, and theories that have been developed in evolutionary biology have been used to explain aspects of human cultural change (e.g., Muller 1870; Darwin [1871] 2003; Pitt-Rivers 1875; James 1880; Huxley 1955; Gerard et al. 1956; Campbell 1975; Cavalli-Sforza and Feldman 1981; Durham 1992; Henrich and McElreath 2003; Mesoudi et al. 2004, 2006; Boyd and Richerson 2005; (...)
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  43. The transparency of experience.Michael G. F. Martin - 2002 - Mind and Language 17 (4):376-425.
    A common objection to sense-datum theories of perception is that they cannot give an adequate account of the fact that introspection indicates that our sensory experiences are directed on, or are about, the mind-independent entities in the world around us, that our sense experience is transparent to the world. In this paper I point out that the main force of this claim is to point out an explanatory challenge to sense-datum theories.
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  44. Consciousness.William G. Lycan - 1987 - MIT Press.
    In this book, William Lycan reviews the diverse philosophical views on consciousness--including those of Kripke, Block, Campbell, Sellars, and Casteneda--and ..
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  45. The limits of self-awareness.Michael G. F. Martin - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):37-89.
    The disjunctive theory of perception claims that we should understand statements about how things appear to a perceiver to be equivalent to statements of a disjunction that either one is perceiving such and such or one is suffering an illusion (or hallucination); and that such statements are not to be viewed as introducing a report of a distinctive mental event or state common to these various disjoint situations. When Michael Hinton first introduced the idea, he suggested that the burden of (...)
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  46. On being alienated.Michael G. F. Martin - 2006 - In Tamar Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Perceptual experience. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Disjunctivism about perceptual appearances, as I conceive of it, is a theory which seeks to preserve a naïve realist conception of veridical perception in the light of the challenge from the argument from hallucination. The naïve realist claims that some sensory experiences are relations to mind-independent objects. That is to say, taking experiences to be episodes or events, the naïve realist supposes that some such episodes have as constituents mind-independent objects. In turn, the disjunctivist claims that in a case of (...)
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  47. Multilattice as the set of truth values for fuzzy rough sets.G. Nguepy Dongmo, B. B. Koguep Njionou, L. Kwuida & M. Onabid - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics:1-20.
    Radzikowska and Kerre developed L-fuzzy rough set as a fuzzy generalisation of the notion of rough sets. Specifically, they have taken a residuated lattice L as the underlying set of truth degrees. However, in real life, we may encounter situations where truth degrees are not always linear, or where the existence of the least upper bound of two elements is no longer required. Instead, there may be the possibility of having minimal upper bounds, and dually, maximal lower bounds, multilattices have (...)
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  48.  43
    Perception of ensemble statistics requires attention.Molly Jackson-Nielsen, Michael A. Cohen & Michael A. Pitts - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 48:149-160.
  49.  37
    Notes & Correspondence.Ludwig Edelstein, Giorgio de Santillana, Walter Pitts, Marie Boas, Thomas S. Kuhn, Herbert Reichner, Louise Patterson & George Sarton - 1952 - Isis 43 (2):119-127.
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  50. Bodily awareness: A sense of ownership.Michael G. F. Martin - 1995 - In José Luis Bermúdez, Anthony Marcel & Naomi Eilan (eds.), The Body and the Self. MIT Press. pp. 267–289.
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