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  1. The Internal Disclosure Policies of Private-Sector Employers: An Initial Look at Their Relationship to Employee Whistleblowing. [REVIEW]Tim Barnett, Daniel S. Cochran & G. Stephen Taylor - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):127 - 136.
    Whistleblowers have usually been treated as outcasts by private-sector employers. But legal, ethical, and practical considerations increasingly compel companies to encourage employees to disclose suspected illegal and/or unethical activities throughinternal communication channels. Internal disclosure policies/procedures (IDPP''s) have been recommended as one way to encourage such communication.This study examined the relationship between IDPP''s and employee whistleblowing among private-sector employers. Almost 300 human resources executives provided data concerning their organizations'' experiences.
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    Ethics, Gratuities, and Professionalization of the Purchasing Function.Gregory B. Turner, G. Stephen Taylor & Mark F. Hartley - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (9):751 - 760.
    This study investigated (1) whether potential future purchasing agents were predisposed to accept gratuities or whether the practice of gratuity acceptance is a manifestation of the job itself, (2) whether the existence of a code of ethics forbidding gratuity acceptance curtails the occurrence, and (3) whether disparities in ethics policies between the sales and purchasing functions affect gratuity acceptance. Hypotheses based upon the concepts of organizational concern and institutionalized ethics are developed and empirically tested. Results suggest that future purchasing agents (...)
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    Individual Privacy and Computer-Based Human Resource Information Systems.G. Stephen Taylor & J. Stephen Davis - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (7):569 - 576.
    The proliferation of computers in the business realm may lead to ethical problems between individual and societal rights, and the organization's need to control costs. In an attempt to explore the causes of this potential conflict, this study examined the varying levels of sensitivity 223 respondents assigned to different types of information typically stored in computer-based human resource information systems. It was found that information most directly related to the job — pay rate, fringe benefits, educational history — was considered (...)
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