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Gabriel Finkelstein
University of Colorado at Denver
  1. Haeckel and du Bois-Reymond: Rival German Darwinists.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2019 - Theory in Biosciences:1-8.
    Ernst Haeckel and Emil du Bois-Reymond were the most prominent champions of Darwin in Germany. This essay compares their contributions to popularizing the theory of evolution, drawing special attention to the neglected figure of du Bois-Reymond as a spokesman for a world devoid of natural purpose. It suggests that the historiography of the German reception of Darwin’s theory needs to be reassessed in the light of du Bois-Reymond’s Lucretian outlook.
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  2.  22
    Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self, and Society in Nineteenth-Century Germany.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2013 - The MIT Press.
    This biography of Emil du Bois-Reymond, the most important forgotten intellectual of the nineteenth century, received an Honorable Mention for History of Science, Medicine, and Technology at the 2013 PROSE Awards, was shortlisted for the 2014 John Pickstone Prize (Britain's most prestigious award for the best scholarly book in the history of science), and was named by the American Association for the Advancement of Science as one of the Best Books of 2014. -/- In his own time (1818–1896) du Bois-Reymond (...)
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  3. Emil du Bois-Reymond on "The Seat of the Soul".Gabriel Finkelstein - 2014 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 23 (1):45-55.
    The German pioneer of electrophysiology, Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818–1896), is generally assumed to have remained silent on the subject of the brain. However, the archive of his papers in Berlin contains manuscript notes to a lecture on “The Seat of the Soul” that he delivered to popular audiences in 1884 and 1885. These notes demonstrate that cerebral localization and brain function in general had been concerns of his for quite some time, and that he did not shy away from these (...)
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  4. The Ascent of Man? Emil du Bois-Reymond's Reflections on Scientific Progress.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2000 - Endeavour 24 (3):129-132.
    Triumphalist histories of science are nothing new but were, in fact, a staple of the 19th century. This article considers one of the more famous works in the genre and argues that it was motivated by doubt more than by faith.
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  5. Emil du Bois-Reymond Vs Ludimar Hermann.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2006 - Comptes Rendus Biologies 329 (5-6):340-347.
    This essay recounts a controversy between a pioneer electrophysiologist, Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818–1896), and his student, Ludimar Hermann (1838–1914). Du Bois-Reymond proposed a molecular explanation for the slight electrical currents that he detected in frog muscles and nerves. Hermann argued that du Bois-Reymond's ‘resting currents’ were an artifact of injury to living tissue. He contested du Bois-Reymond's molecular model, explaining his teacher's observations as electricity produced by chemical decomposition. History has painted Hermann as the wronged party in this dispute. I (...)
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  6.  58
    Response to Richards.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2016 - In Kristin Gjesdal (ed.), Debates in Nineteenth-Century European Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. New York, NY, USA: pp. 226-230.
    Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896) complicates the historiography of the reception of Darwinism. His presentation of the theory was anti-teleological, a fact that refutes the claim that German Darwinists were Romantic.
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  7. Mechanical Neuroscience: Emil du Bois-Reymond’s Innovations in Theory and Practice.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2015 - Frontiers 9 (130):1-4.
    Summary of the major innovations of Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896).
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  8.  93
    Gustav Magnus Und Sein Haus: Im Auftrag der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft, Ed. Dieter Hoffmann, Stuttgart: Verlag Für Geschichte der Naturwissenschaften Und der Technik, 1995. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 1998 - Technology and Culture 39 (3):568-569.
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  9.  65
    Daniel P. Todes, Pavlov’s Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise, Baltimore: John Hopkins, 2002. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2005 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 14 (1):70-71.
  10.  61
    Michel Meulders, Helmholtz, des Lumières aux Neurosciences, Paris: Editions Odile Jacob, 2001. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2002 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 11 (3):317-319.
  11.  60
    Autorité rhétorique: Claude Bernard et Émile du Bois-Reymond.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2012 - In Jean-Gäel Barbara & Pierre Corvol (eds.), Les élèves de Claude Bernard: Les nouvelles disciplines bernardiennes au tournant du XXe siècle. Paris, France: pp. 173-192.
    Professeur Finkelstein avait posée la question, pourquoi, bien que leurs réalisations scientifiques et leur scientifique approche soient similaires, Bernard était beaucoup plus connu dans son pays, France, et à son époque, que Bois-Reymond en Allemagne? Une question similaire a été posée au sujet du pourquoi Darwin est connu pour la théorie de l'évolution, tandis que Wallace a été remis en arrière-fond dans leur temps et dans l'histoire. Selon Finkelstein, la cause de la differences entre Bois-Reymond et Bernard, peut être trouvée (...)
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  12.  54
    Why Darwin Was English.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2000 - Endeavour 24 (2):76-78.
    A ‘late developer’ argument, common to Psychology and Economic History, can be used to explain cultural innovation. It argues that the 19th century theory of natural selection arose in England and not Germany because of – and not in spite of – England’s scientific backwardness. Measured in terms of institutions, communities, and ideas, the relative retardation of English science was precisely what enabled it to adopt German advances in novel ways.
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  13.  53
    Does God Play Dice? Roger Penrose, Quantum Consciousness, and the Debate Over the Limits of Science.Gabriel Finkelstein - manuscript
    A talk delivered at the conference “Science and Religion: The Religious Beliefs and Practices of Scientists—20th Century,” Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen, 28 May 2002.
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  14. “Conquerors of The Künlün”? The Schlagintweit Mission to High Asia, 1854–57.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2000 - History of Science 38 (2):179-218.
    Backstory of "The Man Who Would Be King." A meditation on the limits of scientific and historical representation.
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  15.  52
    Matteucci and du Bois-Reymond: A Bitter Rivalry.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2011 - Archives Italiennes de Biologie 149 (4):29-37.
    This essay considers a long-standing controversy between two nineteenth century pioneers in electrophysiology: the German scientist Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896), and his Italian rival Carlo Matteucci (1811-1868). Historians have generally described their disagreement in du Bois-Reymond’s terms: the product of a contrast in scientific outlook. While not discounting this interpretation, I want to suggest that the controversy was driven as much by the rivals’ similarity as it was by their difference.
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  16.  51
    Romanticism, Race, and Recapitulation.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2001 - Science 294 (5549):2101-2102.
    Why race persists as an idea despite its scientific inutility.
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  17.  32
    M. Du Bois-Reymond Goes To Paris.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Science 36 (3):261-300.
    This article examines the science of electrophysiology developed by Emil du Bois-Reymond in Berlin in the 1840s. In it I recount his major findings, the most significant being his proof of the electrical nature of nerve signals. Du Bois-Reymond also went on to detect this same ‘negative variation’, or action current, in live human subjects. In 1850 he travelled to Paris to defend this startling claim. The essay concludes with a discussion of why his demonstration failed to convince his hosts (...)
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  18.  30
    Russell Stannard, The End of Discovery: Are We Approaching the Boundaries of the Knowable? Oxford; New York: Oxford University, 2010. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2011 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 8 (4):838.
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  19.  14
    John A. McCarthy; Stephanie M. Hilger; Heather I. Sullivan; Nicholas Saul . The Early History of Embodied Cognition, 1740–1920: The Lebenskraft-Debate and Radical Reality in German Science, Music, and Literature. 357 Pp., Bibl. Leiden: Brill, 2016. €99. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2017 - Isis 108 (1):200-201.
    Book review of contributions from scholars of 19th-century German.
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  20.  11
    Peter Meusburger; Thomas Schuch, Eds. Wissenschaftsatlas of Heidelberg University: Spatio-Temporal Relations of Academic Knowledge Production. 391 Pp., Illus., Apps., Bibl. Knittlingen: Verlag Bibliotheca Palatina, 2012. €129. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2014 - Isis 105 (2):418-419.
  21.  18
    New Perspectives on Alexander von Humboldt.Gabriel Finkelstein - 1998 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 6 (1):60-60.
  22.  7
    Emil du Bois-Reymond's Reflections on Consciousness.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2014 - In Chris Smith Harry Whitaker (ed.), Brain, Mind and Consciousness in the History of Neuroscience. Springer. pp. 163-184.
    The late 19th-century Ignorabimus controversy over the limits of scientific knowledge has often been characterized as proclaiming the end of intellectual progress, and by implication, as plunging Germany into a crisis of pessimism from which Liberalism never recovered. My research supports the opposite interpretation. The initiator of the Ignorabimus controversy, Emil du Bois-Reymond, was a physiologist who worked his whole life against the forces of obscurantism, whether they came from the Catholic and Conservative Right or the scientistic and millenarian Left. (...)
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  23.  3
    Karl Clausberg. Zwischen den Sternen: Lichtbildarchive: Was Einstein und Uexküll, Benjamin und das Kino der Astronomie des 19. Jahrhunderts verdanken. x + 270 pp., illus., figs., apps., bibl., indexes. Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 2006. €49.80. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2009 - Isis 100 (1):171-171.
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  24. Emil du Bois-Reymond: The Making of a Liberal German Scientist (1818-1851).Gabriel Finkelstein - 1996 - Dissertation,
     
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  25. Headless in Kashgar.Gabriel Finkelstein - 1999 - Endeavour 23 (1):5-9.
    In 1854 the British East India Company, acting in co-operation with the Prussian Crown, commissioned Hermann, Adolph and Robert Schlagintweit to undertake a scientific expedition to India and High Asia. Despite the mission's outstanding achievements, all the brothers ended forgotten and miserable. This article will discuss (1) how three sons of a Munich eye surgeon attracted and lost so much high-level attention, and (2) what the Schlagintweits' successes and failures tell us about British and German science in the middle of (...)
     
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  26. Marriage and Science in Nineteenth Century Berlin: Emil du Bois-Reymond’s Correspondence with Jeannette Claude.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2004 - In B. P. Wanrooij (ed.), La Mediazione matrimoniale: Il Terzo (in)comodo in Europa fra Otto e Novecento. Rome, Metropolitan City of Rome, Italy: pp. 195-219.
     
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  27. Laura Meneghello, Jacob Moleschott—A Transnational Biography: Science, Politics, and Popularization in Nineteenth-Century Europe, Bielefeld: Transcript-Verlag, 2018. Isis 109, No. 4 (December 2018): 874–875. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2018 - Isis 109:874–875.
  28. The Mountains and the Sea: Travel as Discovery in the Lives of Emil du Bois-Reymond and Ernst Haeckel.Gabriel Finkelstein - 2015 - Chronica Mundi 9 (1):182-192.
     
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