5 found
Order:
  1. The Good, the Bad and the Blameworthy: Understanding the Role of Evaluative Reasoning in Folk Psychology.Joshua Knobe & Gabriel S. Mendlow - 2004 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):252-258.
    People ordinarily make sense of their own behavior and that of others by invoking concepts like belief, desire, and intention. Philosophers refer to this network of concepts and related principles as 'folk psychology.' The prevailing view of folk psychology among philosophers of mind and psychologists is that it is a proto-scientific theory whose function is to explain and predict behavior.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  2.  33
    The Elusive Object of Punishment.Gabriel S. Mendlow - 2019 - Legal Theory 25 (2):105-131.
    All observers of our legal system recognize that criminal statutes can be complex and obscure. But statutory obscurity often takes a particular form that most observers have overlooked: uncertainty about the identity of the wrong a statute aims to punish. It is not uncommon for parties to disagree about the identity of the underlying wrong even as they agree on the statute's elements. Hidden in plain sight, these unexamined disagreements underlie or exacerbate an assortment of familiar disputes—about venue, vagueness, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  6
    On the State’s Exclusive Right to Punish.Gabriel S. Mendlow - 2022 - Law and Philosophy 41 (2):243-262.
    In a characteristically iconoclastic essay, “Does the State Have a Monopoly to Punish Crime?”, Douglas Husak argues that the state’s moral right to punish crime is all but self-evident while its supposed monopoly on punishment is a fiction. Husak draws this bracing conclusion from a modest, quasi-Lockean premise – that persons and other entities have a right to impose stigmatizing deprivations on those who wrong them. This premise evokes John Locke’s far stronger claim that everyone enjoys a natural right to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  56
    Want of Care: An Essay on Wayward Action.Gabriel S. Mendlow - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):299-310.
    Philosophers have taken little heed of the fact that people often act contrary to their better judgment not because they suffer a volitional infirmity like weakness of will or compulsion but instead because they care too little about what they judge best (they are unconcerned) or they care too much about something else (they are compromised). Unconcerned and compromised action, being varieties of akratic action that do not involve volitional infirmity, are phenomena worth examining not only in their own right (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  62
    Review of Christopher Bennett, The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment[REVIEW]Gabriel S. Mendlow - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (2).
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark