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  1.  16
    Motives and comprehension in a public goods game with induced emotions.Simon Bartke, Steven J. Bosworth, Dennis J. Snower & Gabriele Chierchia - 2019 - Theory and Decision 86 (2):205-238.
    This study analyses the sensitivity of public goods contributions through the lens of psychological motives. We report the results of a public goods experiment in which subjects were induced with the motives of care and anger through autobiographical recall. Subjects’ preferences, beliefs, and perceptions under each motive are compared with those of subjects experiencing a neutral autobiographical recall control condition. We find, but only for those subjects with the highest comprehension of the game, that care elicits significantly higher contributions than (...)
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  2.  54
    Navigating Motivation: A Semantic and Subjective Atlas of 7 Motives.Gabriele Chierchia, Marisa Przyrembel, Franca Parianen Lesemann, Steven Bosworth, Dennis Snower & Tania Singer - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:568064.
    Research from psychology, neurobiology and behavioral economics indicates that a binary view of motivation, based on approach and avoidance, may be too reductive. Instead, a literature review suggests that at least seven distinct motives are likely to affect human decisions: “consumption/resource seeking,” “care,” “affiliation,” “achievement,” “status-power,” “threat approach” (or anger), and “threat avoidance” (or fear). To explore the conceptual distinctness and relatedness of these motives, we conducted a semantic categorization task. Here, participants were to assign provided words to one of (...)
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    The differential impact of friendship on cooperative and competitive coordination.Gabriele Chierchia, Fabio Tufano & Giorgio Coricelli - 2020 - Theory and Decision 89 (4):423-452.
    Friendship is commonly assumed to reduce strategic uncertainty and enhance tacit coordination. However, this assumption has never been tested across two opposite poles of coordination involving either strategic complementarity or substitutability. We had participants interact with friends or strangers in two classic coordination games: the stag-hunt game, which exhibits strategic complementarity and may foster “cooperation”, and the entry game, which exhibits strategic substitutability and may foster “competition”. Both games capture a frequent trade-off between a potentially high paying but uncertain option (...)
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