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  1.  12
    Debating Medical Utility, Not Futility: Ethical Dilemmas in Treating Critically Ill People Who Use Injection Drugs.Stephen R. Baldassarri, Ike Lee, Stephen R. Latham & Gail D'Onofrio - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (2):241-251.
    Physicians who care for critically ill people with opioid use disorder frequently face medical, legal, and ethical questions related to the provision of life-saving medical care. We examine a complex medical case that illustrates these challenges in a person with relapsing injection drug use. We focus on a specific question: Is futility an appropriate and useful standard by which to determine provision of life-saving care to such individuals? If so, how should such determinations be made? If not, what alternative decisionmaking (...)
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    Physicians on the Frontlines: Understanding the Lived Experience of Physicians Working in Communities That Experienced a Mass Casualty Shooting.Kathleen M. O'Neill, Blake N. Shultz, Carolyn T. Lye, Megan L. Ranney, Gail D'Onofrio & Edouard Coupet - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S4):55-66.
    This qualitative study describes the lived experience of physicians who work in communities that have experienced a public mass shooting. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seventeen physicians involved in eight separate mass casualty shooting incidents in the United States. Four major themes emerged from constant comparative analysis: The psychological toll on physicians: “I wonder if I'm broken”; the importance of and need for mass casualty shooting preparedness: “[We need to] recognize this as a public health concern and train physicians to (...)
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  3. Understanding the Role of Law in Reducing Firearm Injury Through Clinical Interventions.Blake N. Shultz, Carolyn T. Lye, Gail D'Onofrio, Abbe R. Gluck, Jonathan Miller, Katherine L. Kraschel & Megan L. Ranney - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S4):146-154.
    Firearm injury in the United States is a public health crisis in which physicians are uniquely situated to intervene. However, their ability to mitigate harm is limited by a complex array of laws and regulations that shape their role in firearm injury prevention. This piece uses four clinical scenarios to illustrate how these laws and regulations impact physician practice, including patient counseling, injury reporting, and the use of court orders and involuntary holds. Unintended consequences on clinical practice of laws intended (...)
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