23 found
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  1.  37
    Public Expectations for Return of Results From Large-Cohort Genetic Research.Juli Murphy, Joan Scott, David Kaufman, Gail Geller, Lisa LeRoy & Kathy Hudson - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):36 – 43.
    The National Institutes of Health and other federal health agencies are considering establishing a national biobank to study the roles of genes and environment in human health. A preliminary public engagement study was conducted to assess public attitudes and concerns about the proposed biobank, including the expectations for return of individual research results. A total of 141 adults of different ages, incomes, genders, ethnicities, and races participated in 16 focus groups in six locations across the country. Focus group participants voiced (...)
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  2.  4
    Ethics and Collateral Findings in Pragmatic Clinical Trials.Stephanie R. Morain, Kevin Weinfurt, Juli Bollinger, Gail Geller, Debra J. H. Mathews & Jeremy Sugarman - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (1):6-18.
    Pragmatic clinical trials offer important benefits, such as generating evidence that is suited to inform real-world health care decisions and increasing research efficiency. However, PCTs also present ethical challenges. One such challenge involves the management of information that emerges in a PCT that is unrelated to the primary research question, yet may have implications for the individual patients, clinicians, or health care systems from whom or within which research data were collected. We term these findings as?pragmatic clinical trial collateral findings,? (...)
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  3. Feminism, Bioethics and Genetics.Adrienne Asch & Gail Geller - forthcoming - Feminism and Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.
  4.  6
    Institutional Responsibility and the Flawed Genomic Biomarkers at Duke University: A Missed Opportunity for Transparency and Accountability.David L. DeMets, Thomas R. Fleming, Gail Geller & David F. Ransohoff - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (4):1199-1205.
    When there have been substantial failures by institutional leadership in their oversight responsibility to protect research integrity, the public should demand that these be recognized and addressed by the institution itself, or the funding bodies. This commentary discusses a case of research failures in developing genomic predictors for cancer risk assessment and treatment at a leading university. In its review of this case, the Office of Research Integrity, an agency within the US Department of Health and Human Services, focused their (...)
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  5.  26
    Patient and Family Perspectives on Respect and Dignity in the Intensive Care Unit.Mary Catherine Beach, Lindsay Forbes, Emily Branyon, Hanan Aboumatar, Joseph Carrese, Jeremy Sugarman & Gail Geller - 2015 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (1A):15A-25A.
  6.  19
    Observations of Respect and Dignity in the Intensive Care Unit.Joseph Carrese, Lindsay Forbes, Emily Branyon, Hanan Aboumatar, Gail Geller, Mary Catherine Beach & Jeremy Sugarman - 2015 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (1A):43A-53A.
  7.  11
    Children in Research: New Perspectives and Practices for Informed Consent.Marion E. Broome, Eric Kodish, Gail Geller & Laura A. Siminoff - 2003 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 5 (5):S20 - S23.
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  8.  11
    Case Study: Hope and the Limits of Research.Christopher K. Daugherty & Gail Geller - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (5):20.
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  9.  8
    Hope and the Limits of Research.Christopher K. Daugherty & Gail Geller - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (5):20-22.
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  10.  5
    Implications of the Human Genome Initiative for the Primary Care Physician.Gail Geller & Neil A. Holtzman - 1991 - Bioethics 5 (4):318–325.
  11.  18
    Physicians' Attitudes Toward Disclosure of Genetic Information to Third Parties.Gail Geller, Ellen S. Tambor, Barbara A. Bernhardt, Gary A. Chase, Karen J. Hofman, Ruth R. Faden & Neil A. Holtzman - 1993 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (2):238-240.
    Confidentiality is a cornerstone of the physician-patient relationship. Breaches of confidentiality in the context of genetic testing are of particular concern for a number of reasons. First, genetic testing reveals information not only about a particular patient, but also about his or her family members. Second,genetic testing can label healthy people as “at risk,” subjecting them to possible stigmatization or discrimination by third parties. Third, as genetic testing becomes more widespread and is incorporated into primary care, breaches of confidentiality might (...)
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  12.  14
    “Decoding” Informed Consent: Insights From Women Regarding Breast Cancer Susceptibility Testing.Gail Geller, Misha Strauss, Barbara A. Bernhardt & Neil A. Holtzman - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (2):28-33.
  13.  12
    Understanding Treatment with Respect and Dignity in the Intensive Care Unit.Hanan Aboumatar, Lindsay Forbes, Emily Branyon, Joseph Carrese, Gail Geller, Mary Catherine Beach & Jeremy Sugarman - 2015 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (1A):55A-67A.
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  14.  13
    Conflicts in Learning to Care for Critically Ill Newborns: “It Makes Me Question My Own Morals”.Renee D. Boss, Gail Geller & Pamela K. Donohue - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):437-448.
    Caring for critically ill and dying patients often triggers both professional and personal growth for physician trainees. In pediatrics, the neonatal intensive care unit is among the most distressing settings for trainees. We used longitudinal narrative writing to gain insight into how physician trainees are challenged by and make sense of repetitive, ongoing conflicts experienced as part of caring for very sick and dying babies. The study took place in a 45-bed, university-based NICU in an urban setting in the United (...)
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  15.  7
    A “Holistic” Model of the Healing Relationship: What Would That Require of Physicians?Gail Geller - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):82-85.
  16.  15
    Health Care Professionals’ Perceptions and Experiences of Respect and Dignity in the Intensive Care Unit.Gail Geller, Emily Branyon, Lindsay Forbes, Cynda H. Rushton, Mary Catherine Beach, Joseph Carrese, Hanan Aboumatar & Jeremy Sugarman - 2015 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (1A):27A-42A.
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  17.  18
    Physicians' Attitudes Toward Disclosure of Genetic Information to Third Parties.Gail Geller, Ellen S. Tambor, Barbara A. Bernhardt, Gary A. Chase, Karen J. Hofman, Ruth R. Faden & Neil A. Holtzman - 1993 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (2):238-240.
    Confidentiality is a cornerstone of the physician-patient relationship. Breaches of confidentiality in the context of genetic testing are of particular concern for a number of reasons. First, genetic testing reveals information not only about a particular patient, but also about his or her family members. Second,genetic testing can label healthy people as “at risk,” subjecting them to possible stigmatization or discrimination by third parties. Third, as genetic testing becomes more widespread and is incorporated into primary care, breaches of confidentiality might (...)
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  18.  6
    The Tyranny of Hope.Gail Geller - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (4):3-3.
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  19.  2
    Personal Prenatal Ultrasound Use by Women’s Health Professionals: An Ethical Analysis.Marielle S. Gross, Gail Geller & Anne Drapkin Lyerly - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092098357.
    Prenatal ultrasound use is skyrocketing despite limited evidence of improved outcomes. One factor driving this trend is the widely recognized psychological appeal of real-time fetal imaging. Meanwhile, considering imperfect safety evidence, U.S. professional guidelines dictate that prenatal ultrasound—a screening test—should be governed by expected clinical benefits—an opportunity for intervention. However, when women’s healthcare professionals themselves are pregnant, their access to ultrasound technology permits informal, personal use that may deviate from standard-of-care, e.g., for reassurance. Highlighting a poignant case wherein a pregnant (...)
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  20.  3
    Masks in Medicine: Metaphors and Morality.Lindsey Grubbs & Gail Geller - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):103-107.
    We have never been so aware of masks. They were in short supply in the early days of COVID-19, resulting in significant risk to health care workers. Now they are highly politicized with battles about mask-wearing protocols breaking out in public. Although masks have obtained a new urgency and ubiquity in the context of COVID-19, people have thought about both the literal and metaphorical role of masks in medicine for generations. In this paper, we discuss three such metaphors—the masks of (...)
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  21.  3
    SARS-CoV-2 Safer Infection Sites: Moral Entitlement, Pragmatic Harm Reduction Strategy or Ethical Outrage?Megan F. Hunt, Katharine T. Clark, Gail Geller & Anne Barnhill - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106567.
    The pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 has led to unprecedented changes to society, causing unique problems that call for extraordinary solutions. We consider one such extraordinary proposal: ‘safer infection sites’ that would offer individuals the opportunity to be intentionally infected with SARS-CoV-2, isolate, and receive medical care until they are no longer infectious. Safer infection could have value for various groups of workers and students. Health professionals place themselves at risk of infection daily and extend this risk to their family members and (...)
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  22.  9
    Trustworthy Research Institutions:The Challenging Case of Studying theGenetics of Intelligence.Josephine Johnston, Mohini P. Banerjee & Gail Geller - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (S1):S59-S65.
  23. Conducting Empirical Research on Informed Consent: Challenges and Questions.Greg A. Sachs, Gavin W. Hougham, Jeremy Sugarman, Patricia Agre, Marion E. Broome, Gail Geller, Nancy Kass, Eric Kodish, Jim Mintz, Laura W. Roberts, Pamela Sankar, Laura A. Siminoff, James Sorenson & Anita Weiss - 2003 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 25 (5):S4.
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