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  1.  30
    Exploring the Geography of Corporate Philanthropic Disaster Response: A Study of Fortune Global 500 Firms.Alan Muller & Gail Whiteman - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):589-603.
    In recent years, major disasters have figured prominently in the media. While corporate response to disasters may have raised corporate philanthropy to a new level, it remains an understudied phenomenon. This article draws on comparative research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate philanthropy to explore the geography of corporate philanthropic disaster response. The study analyzes donation announcements made by Fortune Global 500 firms from North America, Europe and Asia to look for regional patterns across three recent disasters: the South (...)
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  2.  43
    “AIDS is Not a Business”: A Study in Global Corporate Responsibility – Securing Access to Low-Cost HIV Medications.William Flanagan & Gail Whiteman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):65-75.
    At the end of the 1990s, Brazil was faced with a potentially explosive HIV/AIDS epidemic. Through an innovative and multifaceted campaign, and despite initial resistance from multinational pharmaceutical companies, the government of Brazil was able to negotiate price reductions for HIV medications and develop local production capacity, thereby averting a public health disaster. Using interview data and document analysis, the authors show that the exercise of corporate social responsibility can be viewed in practice as a dynamic negotiation and an interaction (...)
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  3.  18
    Corporate Philanthropic Responses to Emergent Human Needs: The Role of Organizational Attention Focus.Alan Muller & Gail Whiteman - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (2):299-314.
    Research on corporate philanthropy typically focuses on organization-external pressures and aggregated donation behavior. Hence, our understanding of the organization-internal structures that determine whether a given organization will respond philanthropically to a specific human need remains underdeveloped. We explicate an attention-based framework in which specific dimensions of organization-level attention focus interact to predict philanthropic responses to an emergent human need. Exploring the response of Fortune Global 500 firms to the 2004 South Asian tsunami, we find that management attention focused on people (...)
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  4.  32
    That Which Doesn’T Break Us: Identity Work by Local Indigenous ‘Stakeholders’. [REVIEW]Eveline Bruijn & Gail Whiteman - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):479 - 495.
    This article describes a case study on the Machiguenga, a remote Indigenous tribe affected by the Camisea Gas Project in the Peru. We introduce the anthropological concept of 'glocalization' and integrate this with organizational knowledge of 'identity work'. Our findings demonstrate that identity work is a multi-faceted and boundary spanning process that significantly affects stakeholder relations and contributes to conflict between local communities and oil and gas companies. Indigenous identity can be both threatened and strengthened in response to natural gas (...)
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  5.  6
    That Which Doesn’T Break Us: Identity Work by Local Indigenous ‘Stakeholders’.Eveline Bruijn & Gail Whiteman - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):479-495.
    This article describes a case study on the Machiguenga, a remote Indigenous tribe affected by the Camisea Gas Project in the Peru. We introduce the anthropological concept of ‘glocalization’ and integrate this with organizational knowledge of ‘identity work’. Our findings demonstrate that identity work is a multi-faceted and boundary spanning process that significantly affects stakeholder relations and contributes to conflict between local communities and oil and gas companies. Indigenous identity can be both threatened and strengthened in response to natural gas (...)
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  6.  23
    “AIDS is Not a Business”.William Flanagan & Gail Whiteman - 2005 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 2:375-391.
    Most major pharmaceutical companies have corporate social responsibility policies that pledge their commitment to improving the health and quality of life of people around the world. Yet these same companies also have difficulty in ensuring that developing countries have access to affordable medications. In the late 1990s, Brazil engaged in a heated battle with large US-backed multinational pharmaceutical companies. Brazil was facing a growing HIV epidemic and was determined to provide treatment to those in need. This required massive price reductions (...)
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  7.  20
    AIDS is Not a Business.William Flanagan & Gail Whiteman - 2005 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 2:375-391.
    Most major pharmaceutical companies have corporate social responsibility policies that pledge their commitment to improving the health and quality of life of people around the world. Yet these same companies also have difficulty in ensuring that developing countries have access to affordable medications. In the late 1990s, Brazil engaged in a heated battle with large US-backed multinational pharmaceutical companies. Brazil was facing a growing HIV epidemic and was determined to provide treatment to those in need. This required massive price reductions (...)
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