Results for 'Galileo'

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  1. Galileo's Logical Treatises a Translation, with Notes and Commentary, of His Appropriated Latin Questions on Aristotle's Posterior Analytics.Galileo Galilei & William A. Wallace - 1992
  2.  14
    Galileo Galilei in »prvi kopernikanski proces«: narava in Sveto pismo.Galileo Galilei - 2015 - Filozofski Vestnik 36 (1).
    V pričujočem sklopu so prevedena izbrana pisma Galilea Galileija ter njegovih korespondentov o problematiki razmerja med naravoslovnim oz. filozofskim raziskovanjem in Svetim pismom in s to problematiko povezani dokumenti iz Vatikanskega tajnega arhiva iz obdobja t. i. Galileijevega prvega procesa. Sklop zaključuje Galileijeva Razprava o morskem plimovanju, ki vsebinsko sicer ne zadeva omenjene problematike, je pa nastala kot posledica takratnega dogajanja. Vsa pisma so prevedena po kritični izdaji Galileijevih del, Le Opere di Galileo Galilei, ur. Antonio Favaro, Barbèra, Firence (...)
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  3. Galileo Against the Philosophers in His Dialogue of Cecco di Ronchitti and Considerations of Alimberto Mauri.Galileo Galilei & Stillman Drake - 1976 - Zeitlin & Ver Brugge.
     
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  4. Galileo on the World Systems: A New Abridged Translation and Guide.Galileo Galilei - 1997
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  5. Galileo and the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century.Alexandre Koyre - 1943 - Philosophical Review 52 (4):333-348.
  6.  44
    Galileo’s Gauge: Understanding the Empirical Significance of Gauge Symmetry.Nicholas Teh - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (1):93-118.
    This article investigates and resolves the question whether gauge symmetry can display analogs of the famous Galileo’s ship scenario. In doing so, it builds on and clarifies the work of Greaves and Wallace on this subject.
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  7.  3
    Galileo Gleanings XII: An Unpublished Letter of Galileo to Peiresc.Stillman Drake & Galileo Galilei - 1962 - Isis 53:201-211.
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  8.  10
    Galileo Gleanings XII: An Unpublished Letter of Galileo to Peiresc.Stillman Drake & Galileo Galilei - 1962 - Isis 53 (2):201-211.
  9. Galileo Studies.Alexandre Koyré & John Mepham - 1978
     
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  10.  9
    Galileo and His Sources the Heritage of the Collegio Romano in Galileo s Science.Joseph C. Pitt - 1984
  11. Galileo Galilei 1564-1642.A. M. Deborin, A. G. Grumm-Grzhimailo, N. I. Idel son & Galileo Galilei - 1943 - Izd-Vo Akademiia Nauk Sssr.
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  12. Galileo and the Indispensability of Scientific Thought Experiment.Tamar Szabó Gendler - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):397-424.
    By carefully examining one of the most famous thought experiments in the history of science—that by which Galileo is said to have refuted the Aristotelian theory that heavier bodies fall faster than lighter ones—I attempt to show that thought experiments play a distinctive role in scientific inquiry. Reasoning about particular entities within the context of an imaginary scenario can lead to rationally justified concluusions that—given the same initial information—would not be rationally justifiable on the basis of a straightforward argument.
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  13. Galileo’s Interventionist Notion of “Cause‘.Steffen Ducheyne - 2006 - Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (3):443-464.
    In this essay, I shall take up the theme of Galileo’s notion of cause, which has already received considerable attention. I shall argue that the participants in the debate as it stands have overlooked a striking and essential feature of Galileo’s notion of cause. Galileo not only reformed natural philosophy, he also – as I shall defend – introduced a new notion of causality and integrated it in his scientific practice. Galileo’s conception of causality went hand (...)
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  14. Galileo and the Art of Reasoning: Rhetorical Foundations of Logic and Scientific Method.Maurice A. Finocchiaro - 1980 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 15 (2):134-135.
     
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  15. Galileo, the Jesuits and the Medieval Aristotle.William A. Wallace - 1991
  16.  20
    Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences.Galileo Galilei - 1914 - Dover Publications.
    FIRST DAY INTERLOCUTORS: SALVIATI, SA- GREDO AND SIMPLICIO ALV. The constant activity which you Venetians display in your famous arsenal suggests to the ...
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  17.  57
    Galileo and Prior Philosophy.David Atkinson & Jeanne Peijnenburg - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):115-136.
    Galileo claimed inconsistency in the Aristotelian dogma concerning falling bodies and stated that all bodies must fall at the same rate. However, there is an empirical situation where the speeds of falling bodies are proportional to their weights; and even in vacuo all bodies do not fall at the same rate under terrestrial conditions. The reason for the deficiency of Galileo’s reasoning is analyzed, and various physical scenarios are described in which Aristotle’s claim is closer to the truth (...)
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  18.  78
    Galileo's Theological Venture.Ernan McMullin - 2013 - Zygon 48 (1):192-220.
    In this essay, I will lay out first in some detail the exegetical principles implicit in Augustine's treatment of an early apparent conflict between Scripture and the findings of “sense or reason.” Then I will analyze Galileo's two major discussions of the issue, first in his Letter to Castelli, and then in his Letter to the Grand Duchess, touching on Foscarini's ill-fated Letter in between. I will turn then to an internal tension that many commentators have perceived within the (...)
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  19. Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems.Galileo Galilei & Stillman Drake - 1954 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (19):253-256.
  20.  17
    Galileo and His Sources: The Heritage of the Collegio Romano in Galileo's Science.Joseph C. Pitt - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (1):138-140.
  21.  34
    Galileo and Reasoning Ex Suppositione: The Methodology of the Two New Sciences.William A. Wallace - 1974 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1974:79 - 104.
  22. Galileo, Courtier: The Practice of Science in the Culture of Absolutism.Mario Biagioli & R. H. Naylor - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (3):315-316.
     
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  23.  15
    Galileo as a Critic of the Arts.Erwin Panofsky - 1958 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 17 (1):124-125.
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  24. On Galileo's Visions: Piercing the Spheres of the Heavens by Eye and Mind.Birgitta Dresp-Langley - 2014 - Perception 43:1280-1282.
    This bookreview discusses Piccolino and Wades' book on Galileo's impact on contemporary perception science.
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  25.  48
    Galileo and Plato.Alexandre Koyre - 1994 - Neusis 1 (1/4):51-83.
  26.  23
    Studying Galileo at Secondary School: A Reconstruction of His 'Jumping-Hill'experiment and the Process of Discovery.Jürgen Teichmann - 1999 - Science & Education 8 (2):121-136.
  27. Galileo's Ship and Spacetime Symmetry.Tim Budden - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):483-516.
    The empirical content of the modern definition of relativity given in the Andersonian approach to spacetime theory has been overestimated. It does not imply the empirical relativity Galileo illustrated in his famous ship thought experiment. I offer a number of arguments—some of which are in essential agreement with a recent analysis of Brown and Sypel [1995]—which make this plausible. Then I go on to present example spacetime theories which are modern relativistic but violate Galileo's relativity. I end by (...)
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  28. How Galileo Dropped the Ball and Fermat Picked It Up.Bryan W. Roberts - 2011 - Synthese 180 (3):337-356.
    This paper introduces a little-known episode in the history of physics, in which a mathematical proof by Pierre Fermat vindicated Galileo’s characterization of freefall. The first part of the paper reviews the historical context leading up to Fermat’s proof. The second part illustrates how a physical and a mathematical insight enabled Fermat’s result, and that a simple modification would satisfy any of Fermat’s critics. The result is an illustration of how a purely theoretical argument can settle an apparently empirical (...)
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  29.  18
    Hobbes, Galileo, and the Physics of Simple Circular Motions.John Henry - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):9-38.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 9 - 38 Hobbes tried to develop a strict version of the mechanical philosophy, in which all physical phenomena were explained only in terms of bodies in motion, and the only forces allowed were forces of collision or impact. This ambition puts Hobbes into a select group of original thinkers, alongside Galileo, Isaac Beeckman, and Descartes. No other early modern thinkers developed a strict version of the mechanical philosophy. Natural philosophies relying solely (...)
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  30. Egidio Festa and Sophie Roux1 the Enigma of the Inclined Plane From Heron to Galileo.Michel Varro, Simon Stevin & Galileo Galilei - 2008 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 195:195.
  31.  25
    Galileo at Work: His Scientific Biography.Stillman Drake - 1980 - Philosophy of Science 47 (1):154-156.
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  32. Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion.Ronald L. Numbers - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (4):823-824.
     
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  33.  67
    Galileo's First New Science: The Science of Matter.Zvi Biener - 2004 - Perspectives on Science 12 (3):262-287.
    : Although Galileo's struggle to mathematize the study of nature is well known and oft discussed, less discussed is the form this struggle takes in relation to Galileo's first new science, the science of the second day of the Discorsi. This essay argues that Galileo's first science ought to be understood as the science of matter—not, as it is usually understood, the science of the strength of materials. This understanding sheds light on the convoluted structure of the (...)
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  34.  58
    Galileo's Road to Truth and the Demonstrative Regress.N. Jardine - 1976 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 7 (4):277.
  35.  10
    Galileo and the Problem of Accidents.Noretta Koertge - 1977 - Journal of the History of Ideas 38 (3):389.
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  36.  47
    Galileo: A Philosophical Study.Dudley Shapere - 1974 - University of Chicago Press.
  37.  32
    Galileo in Padua: Architecture, Fortifications, Mathematics and “Practical” Science.Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2015 - Lettera Matematica Pristem International 2 (4):209-222.
    During his stay in Padua ca. 1592–1610, Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) was a lecturer of mathematics at the University of Padua and a tutor to private students of military architecture and fortifications. He carried out these activities at the Academia degli Artisti. At the same time, and in relation to his teaching activities, he began to study the equilibrium of bodies and strength of materials, later better structured and completed in his Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences of 1638. This paper (...)
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  38.  84
    Galileo's Refutation of the Speed-Distance Law of Fall Rehabilitated.John D. Norton & Bryan W. Roberts - 2010 - Centaurus 54 (2):148-164.
    Galileo's refutation of the speed-distance law of fall in his Two New Sciences is routinely dismissed as a moment of confused argumentation. We urge that Galileo's argument correctly identified why the speed-distance law is untenable, failing only in its very last step. Using an ingenious combination of scaling and self-similarity arguments, Galileo found correctly that bodies, falling from rest according to this law, fall all distances in equal times. What he failed to recognize in the last step (...)
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  39.  24
    Galileo and Plato.Alexandre Koyre - 1943 - Journal of the History of Ideas 4 (4):400.
  40. Galileo and the Art of Reasoning: Rhetorical Foundations of Logic and Scientific Method.Maurice A. Finocchiaro - 1980 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 15 (2):136-138.
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  41.  12
    Galileo's 1604 Fragment on Falling Bodies.Stillman Drake - 1969 - British Journal for the History of Science 4 (4):340-358.
    The first attempted derivation by Galileo of the law relating space and time in free fall that has survived is preserved on an otherwise unidentified sheet bound among his manuscripts preserved at Florence. It is undoubtedly closely associated with a letter from Galileo to Paolo Sarpi, dated 16 October 1604, which somehow found its way into the Seminary of Pisa, where it is still preserved. Those two documents, together with the letter from Sarpi to Galileo which seems (...)
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  42.  45
    The Architecture of Matter: Galileo to Kant.Thomas Holden - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Holden presents a fascinating study of theories of matter in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. These theories were plagued by a complex of interrelated problems concerning matter's divisibility, composition, and internal architecture. Is any material body infinitely divisible? Must we posit atoms or elemental minima from which bodies are ultimately composed? Are the parts of material bodies themselves material concreta? Or are they merely potentialities or possible existents? Questions such as these -- and the press of subtler questions hidden (...)
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  43.  81
    Galileo's Mathematization of Nature at the Crossroad Between the Empiricist and the Kantian Tradition.Michela Massimi - 2010 - Perspectives on Science 18 (2):pp. 152-188.
    The aim of this paper is to take Galileo's mathematization of nature as a springboard for contrasting the time-honoured empiricist conception of phenomena, exemplified by Pierre Duhem's analysis in To Save the Phenomena , with Immanuel Kant's. Hence the purpose of this paper is twofold. I) On the philosophical side, I want to draw attention to Kant's more robust conception of phenomena compared to the one we have inherited from Duhem and contemporary empiricism. II) On the historical side, I (...)
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  44.  41
    Galileo's Lunar Observations: Do They Imply the Rejection of Traditional Lunar Theory?Fred Wilson - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (3):557-570.
  45.  17
    Galileo's Experimental Confirmation of Horizontal Inertia: Unpublished Manuscripts.Stillman Drake - 1973 - Isis 64 (3):291-305.
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  46.  27
    Mechanics Lost: Husserl’s Galileo and Ihde’s Telescope.Harald A. Wiltsche - 2017 - Husserl Studies 33 (2):149-173.
    Don Ihde has recently launched a sweeping attack against Husserl’s late philosophy of science. Ihde takes particular exception to Husserl’s portrayal of Galileo and to the results Husserl draws from his understanding of Galilean science. Ihde’s main point is that Husserl paints an overly intellectualistic picture of the “father of modern science”, neglecting Galileo’s engagement with scientific instruments such as, most notably, the telescope. According to Ihde, this omission is not merely a historiographical shortcoming. On Ihde’s view, it (...)
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  47.  21
    Galileo: The Search for the Parabolic Trajectory.R. H. Naylor - 1976 - Annals of Science 33 (2):153-172.
    Recent study of Galileo's surviving manuscript notes on motion has revealed that by 1609 he had developed the major part of his theory of projectile motion. During the period of these theoretical advances Galileo was engaged in important related experimental investigations; this has become clear from the study of folios 114r and 116v of the manuscript on motion. This paper provides an interpretation of a manuscript not previously discussed—folio 81r. The analysis provided indicates that it is evidence of (...)
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  48.  91
    Husserl, Galileo, and the Processes of Idealization.James W. Garrison - 1986 - Synthese 66 (2):329 - 338.
    This essay is concerned with the processes of idealization as described by Husserl in his last work, "The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology". Central as the processes of idealization are to Husserl's reflections on the origin of natural scientific knowledge and his attempt to reground that knowledge in the "forgotten meaning-fundament of natural science," they have not always been well understood. One reason for this is the lack of concrete historical examples. The main purpose of this paper is (...)
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  49.  56
    Galileo's Lunar Observations in the Context of Medieval Lunar Theory.Roger Ariew - 1984 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 15 (3):213-226.
  50.  38
    Galileo on the Telescope and the Eye.Harold I. Brown - 1985 - Journal of the History of Ideas 46 (4):487.
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