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  1.  9
    Mechanism, Vitalism and Organicism in Late Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Biology: The Importance of Historical Context.Garland E. Allen - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (2):261-283.
  2.  8
    JHB as a Collaborative Effort.Garland E. Allen & Jane Maienschein - 2017 - Journal of the History of Biology 50 (3):469-471.
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  3.  5
    Thomas Hunt Morgan, The Man and His Science.Garland E. Allen - 1980 - Philosophy of Science 47 (4):662-666.
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  4.  15
    Morphology and Twentieth-Century Biology: A Response.Garland E. Allen - 1981 - Journal of the History of Biology 14 (1):159 - 176.
  5.  17
    Hugo De Vries and the Reception of the "Mutation Theory".Garland E. Allen - 1969 - Journal of the History of Biology 2 (1):55 - 87.
    De Vries' mutation theory has not stood the test of time. The supposed mutations of Oenothera were in reality complex recombination phenomena, ultimately explicable in Mendelian terms, while instances of large-scale mutations were found wanting in other species. By 1915 the mutation theory had begun to lose its grip on the biological community; by de Vries' death in 1935 it was almost completely abandoned. Yet, as we have seen, during the first decade of the present century it achieved an enormous (...)
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  6.  21
    Hans Spemann on Vitalism in Biology: Translation of a Portion of Spemann's "Autobiography". [REVIEW]Viktor Hamburger, Garland E. Allen, Jane Maienschein & Hans Spemann - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):231 - 243.
  7.  30
    A Pact with the Embryo: Viktor Hamburger, Holistic and Mechanistic Philosophy in the Development of Neuroembryology, 1927?1955. [REVIEW]Garland E. Allen - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):421-475.
    Viktor Hamburger was a developmental biologist interested in the ontogenesis of the vertebrate nervous system. A student of Hans Spemann at Freiburg in the 1920s, Hamburger picked up a holistic view of the embryo that precluded him from treating it in a reductionist way; at the same time, he was committed to a materialist and analytical approach that eschewed any form of vitalism or metaphysics. This paper explores how Hamburger walked this thin line between mechanistic reductionism and metaphysical vitalism in (...)
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    Science, History and Social Activism: A Tribute to Everett Mendelsohn.Garland E. Allen & Roy M. Macleod - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):405-406.
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  9. Notes on Source Materials: The Edwin Grant Conklin Papers at Princeton University.Garland E. Allen - 1968 - Journal of the History of Biology 1 (2):325-331.
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