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  1.  9
    Guide to Buddhist ReligionThe World of BuddhismA Treasury of Mahayana Sutras: Selections From the Maharatnakuta SutraA Record of Buddhist Monasteries in Lo-YangNagarjuna: The Philosophy of the Middle Way.Frank E. Reynolds, John Holt, John Strong, Heinz Bechert, Richard Gombrich, Garma C. C. Chang, Yang Hsuanchih, Yi-T'ung Wang & David J. Kalupahana - 1986 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 6:163.
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  2.  2
    The Buddhist Teaching of Totality: The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism.Thaddeus J. Gurdak & Garma C. C. Chang - 1974 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 94 (4):525.
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  3. The Buddhist Teaching of Totality. The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism.Garma C. C. Chang - 1975 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 37 (2):348-349.
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  4.  13
    Letters to the Editor.Garma C. C. Chang & Francis H. Cook - 1974 - Philosophy East and West 24 (4):467 - 470.
  5. The Buddhist Teaching of Totality: The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism.Garma C. C. Chang - 2001 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The Hwa Yen school of Mahāyāna Buddhism bloomed in China in the 7th and 8th centuries A.D. Today many scholars regard its doctrines of Emptiness, Totality, and Mind-Only as the crown of Buddhist thought and as a useful and unique philosophical system and explanation of man, world, and life as intuitively experienced in Zen practice. For the first time in any Western language Garma Chang explains and exemplifies these doctrines with references to both oriental masters and Western philosophers. The Buddha's (...)
     
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  6. The Buddhist Teaching of Totality: The Philosophy of Hwa Yen Buddhism.Garma C. C. Chang - 1990 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The Hwa Yen school of Mahāyāna Buddhism bloomed in China in the 7th and 8th centuries A.D. Today many scholars regard its doctrines of Emptiness, Totality, and Mind-Only as the crown of Buddhist thought and as a useful and unique philosophical system and explanation of man, world, and life as intuitively experienced in Zen practice. For the first time in any Western language Garma Chang explains and exemplifies these doctrines with references to both oriental masters and Western philosophers. The Buddha's (...)
     
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