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Gary Shute [5]Gary M. Shute [2]
  1. Abstraction in computer science.Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute - 2007 - Minds and Machines 17 (2):169-184.
    We characterize abstraction in computer science by first comparing the fundamental nature of computer science with that of its cousin mathematics. We consider their primary products, use of formalism, and abstraction objectives, and find that the two disciplines are sharply distinguished. Mathematics, being primarily concerned with developing inference structures, has information neglect as its abstraction objective. Computer science, being primarily concerned with developing interaction patterns, has information hiding as its abstraction objective. We show that abstraction through information hiding is a (...)
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  2. Decoupling as a Fundamental Value of Computer Science.Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (2):241-259.
    Computer science is an engineering science whose objective is to determine how to best control interactions among computational objects. We argue that it is a fundamental computer science value to design computational objects so that the dependencies required by their interactions do not result in couplings, since coupling inhibits change. The nature of knowledge in any science is revealed by how concepts in that science change through paradigm shifts, so we analyze classic paradigm shifts in both natural and computer science (...)
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  3. Abstraction, law, and freedom in computer science.Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (3):345-364.
    Abstract: Laws of computer science are prescriptive in nature but can have descriptive analogs in the physical sciences. Here, we describe a law of conservation of information in network programming, and various laws of computational motion (invariants) for programming in general, along with their pedagogical utility. Invariants specify constraints on objects in abstract computational worlds, so we describe language and data abstraction employed by software developers and compare them to Floridi's concept of levels of abstraction. We also consider Floridi's structural (...)
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    Abstraction, Law, and Freedom in Computer Science.Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute - 2011 - In Armen T. Marsoobian, Brian J. Huschle, Eric Cavallero & Patrick Allo (eds.), Putting Information First. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 97–115.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Computer Science as the Master of Its Domain The Concept of Law in Computer Science Computer Science Laws as Invariants The Interplay of Freedom and Constraint Conclusion References.
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    Type and Metaphor for Computer Programmers.Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute - 2017 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 21 (1):71-105.
    The duality of computer programs is characterized, on the one hand, by their physical implementations on physical devices, and, on the other, by the conceptual implementations in programmers’ minds of the objects making up the computational processes they conceive. We contend that central to programmers’ conceptual implementations are (i) the concept of type, at both the programming and the design level, and (ii) metaphors created to facilitate these implementations.
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    Book Reviews: George Lakoff and Rafael E. Núñez, Where Mathematics Comes From, New York: Basic Books, 2000, xvii+493 pp., $30.00, ISBN 0-46503-770-4. [REVIEW]Gary M. Shute - 2004 - Minds and Machines 15 (1):118-123.
  7.  36
    Review of G. Lakoff and R. E. Núñez, Where Mathematics Comes From[REVIEW]Gary M. Shute - 2005 - Minds and Machines 15 (1):118-123.