Results for 'Gast��n Robert'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  33
    Berkwitz, Stephen C., ED., Buddhism in World Cultures: Comparative Perspectives: Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 2006, 373 + Xi Pp., ISBN: 1-85109-782-1 Hb; 1-85109-787-2, E-Book. [REVIEW]N. Robert Glass - 2009 - Sophia 48 (1):93-94.
  2.  27
    Hellenica: Recueil d'Épigraphie, de Numismatique Et d'Antiquités Grecques, VII. By L. Robert. Pp. 254; Pl. 24. Paris: Librairie Adrien-Maisonneuve, 1949. [REVIEW]M. N. Tod & L. Robert - 1950 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 70:81-82.
  3.  26
    A Logic of the Heart: Re-Reading Taoism and Zen Buddhism.N. Robert Glass - 1998 - International Philosophical Quarterly 38 (4):383-392.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  1
    Meaning and Modernisation: ROBERT N.BELLAH.Robert N. Bellah - 1968 - Religious Studies 4 (1):37-45.
    Modernisation, whatever else it involves, is always a moral and a religious problem. If it has sometimes been hailed as an exhilarating challenge to create new values and meanings it has also often been feared as a threat to an existing pattern of values and meanings. In either case the personal and social forces called into play have been powerful.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  78
    Genes, Organisms, Populations: Controversies Over the Units of Selection.Robert N. Brandon & Richard M. Burian (eds.) - 1984 - Bradford.
    This anthology collects some of the most important papers on what is believed to be the major force in evolution, natural selection. An issue of great consequence in the philosophy of biology concerns the levels at which, and the units upon which selection acts. In recent years, biologists and philosophers have published a large number of papers bearing on this subject. The papers selected for inclusion in this book are divided into three main sections covering the history of the subject, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  6.  11
    Collection Froehner, I. Inscriptions Grecques.M. N. Tod & Louis Robert - 1939 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 59:301.
  7.  25
    The Nature of Selection: Evolutionary Theory in Philosophical Focus.Robert N. Brandon - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (4):614.
  8.  73
    Adaptation and Evolutionary Theory.Robert N. Brandon - 1978 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 9 (3):181.
  9.  16
    Sri Aurobindo's Integral View of Other Religions: ROBERT N. MINOR.Robert N. Minor - 1979 - Religious Studies 15 (3):365-377.
    Sri Aurobindo Ghose , the Indian Nationalist and yogi, developed in the period of his life at Pondicherry in Southeast India a system of thought, practice and experience which he called ‘Integral Yoga’. The title indicated, he said, that ‘it takes up the essence and many processes of the old Yogas — its newness is in its aim, standpoint and the totality of its method’. In the development of Integral Yoga Aurobindo believed he was speaking and acting as a ‘realized (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Explanatory Pluralism and The Heuristic Identity Theory.Robert N. McCauley - unknown
    University and William Bechtel Washington University Abstract Explanatory pluralism holds that the sorts of comprehensive theoretical and ontological economies, which microreductionists and New Wave reductionists envision and which antireductionists fear, offer misleading views of both scientific practice and scientific progress. Both advocates and foes of employing reductionist strategies at the interface of psychology and neuroscience have overplayed the alleged economies that interlevel connections (including identities) justify while overlooking their fundamental role in promoting scientific research. A brief review of research on (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  11. Bringing Ritual to Mind: Psychological Foundations of Cultural Forms.Robert N. McCauley - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Bringing Ritual to Mind explores the cognitive and psychological foundations of religious ritual systems. Participants must recall their rituals well enough to ensure a sense of continuity across performances, and those rituals must motivate them to transmit and re-perform them. Most religious rituals the world over exploit either high performance frequency or extraordinary emotional stimulation to enhance their recollection. But why do some rituals exploit the first of these variables while others exploit the second? McCauley and Lawson advance the ritual (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  12. The Naturalness of Religion and the Unnaturalness of Science.Robert N. McCauley - unknown
    Aristotle's observation that all human beings by nature desire to know aptly captures the spirit of "intellectualist" research in psychology and anthropology. Intellectualists in these fields agree that humans' have fundamental explanatory interests (which reflect their rationality) and that the idioms in which their explanations are couched can differ considerably across places and times (both historical and developmental). Intellectualists in developmental psychology (e.g., Gopnik and Meltzoff, 1997) maintain that young children's conceptual structures, like those of scientists, are theories and that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  13. Susceptibility to the Muller-Lyer Illusion, Theory-Neutral Observation, and the Diachronic Penetrability of the Visual Input System.Robert N. McCauley & Joseph Henrich - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (1):79-101.
    Jerry Fodor has consistently cited the persistence of illusions--especially the M.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  14.  10
    Associative Engines: Connectionism, Concepts and Representational Change.Robert N. McCauley - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (179):241-243.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  15. Kant's Moral Philosophy.Robert N. Johnson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Immanuel Kant (1724–1804) argued that moral requirements are based on a standard of rationality he dubbed the “Categorical Imperative” (CI). Immorality thus involves a violation of the CI and is thereby irrational. Other philosophers, such as Locke and Hobbes, had also argued that moral requirements are based on standards of rationality. However, these standards were either desirebased instrumental principles of rationality or based on sui generis rational intuitions. Kant agreed with many of his predecessors that an analysis of practical reason (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  16. Virtue and Right.Robert N. Johnson - 2003 - Ethics 113 (4):810-834.
  17. Internal Reasons and the Conditional Fallacy.Robert N. Johnson - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (194):53-72.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  18.  54
    Self-Improvement: An Essay in Kantian Ethics.Robert N. Johnson - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Is there any moral obligation to improve oneself, to foster and develop various capacities in oneself? From a broadly Kantian point of view, Self-Improvement defends the view that there is such an obligation and that it is an obligation that each person owes to him or herself. The defence addresses a range of arguments philosophers have mobilized against this idea, including the argument that it is impossible to owe anything to yourself, and the view that an obligation to improve onself (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19.  65
    From Icons to Symbols: Some Speculations on the Origins of Language. [REVIEW]Robert N. Brandon & Norbert Hornstein - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (2):169-189.
    This paper is divided into three sections. In the first section we offer a retooling of some traditional concepts, namely icons and symbols, which allows us to describe an evolutionary continuum of communication systems. The second section consists of an argument from theoretical biology. In it we explore the advantages and disadvantages of phenotypic plasticity. We argue that a range of the conditions that selectively favor phenotypic plasticity also favor a nongenetic transmission system that would allow for the inheritance of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  20.  98
    Biological Teleology: Questions and Explanations.Robert N. Brandon - 1981 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 12 (2):91.
    This paper gives an account of evolutionary explanations in biology. Briefly, the explanations I am primarily concerned with are explanations of adaptations. These explanations are contrasted with other nonteleological evolutionary explanations. The distinction is made by distinguishing the different kinds of questions these different explanations serve to answer. The sense in which explanations of adaptations are teleological is spelled out.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  21. Does Biology Have Laws? The Experimental Evidence.Robert N. Brandon - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):457.
    In this paper I argue that we can best make sense of the practice of experimental evolutionary biology if we see it as investigating contingent, rather than lawlike, regularities. This understanding is contrasted with the experimental practice of certain areas of physics. However, this presents a problem for those who accept the Logical Positivist conception of law and its essential role in scientific explanation. I address this problem by arguing that the contingent regularities of evolutionary biology have a limited range (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  22. The Principle of Drift: Biology's First Law.Robert N. Brandon - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy 103 (7):319-335.
    Drift is to evolution as inertia is to Newtonian mechanics. Both are the "natural" or default states of the systems to which they apply. Both are governed by zero-force laws. The zero-force law in biology is stated here for the first time.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  23.  20
    The Churchlands and Their Critics.Robert N. McCauley (ed.) - 1996 - Blackwell.
    The influence of Patricia and Paul Churchland's work on contemporary philosophy and cognitive science has been profound. The Churchlands have challenged nearly all prevailing doctrines concerning knowledge, mind, science, and language.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  24.  18
    Johnson , Robert N. Self-Improvement: An Essay in Kantian Ethics Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. Viii+174. $55.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Robert B. Louden - 2012 - Ethics 122 (4):811-815.
    Book Reviews Anne Margaret Baxley, Kantian Review, FirstView Article.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  1
    Concepts and Methods in Evolutionary Biology.Robert N. Brandon - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Robert Brandon is one of the most important and influential of contemporary philosophers of biology. This collection of his recent essays covers all the traditional topics in the philosophy of evolutionary biology and as such could serve as an introduction to the field. There are essays on the nature of fitness, teleology, the structure of the theory of natural selection, and the levels of selection. The book also deals with newer topics that are less frequently discussed but are of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  26.  91
    The Indeterministic Character of Evolutionary Theory: No "No Hidden Variables Proof" but No Room for Determinism Either.Robert N. Brandon & Scott Carson - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):315-337.
    In this paper we first briefly review Bell's (1964, 1966) Theorem to see how it invalidates any deterministic "hidden variable" account of the apparent indeterminacy of quantum mechanics (QM). Then we show that quantum uncertainty, at the level of DNA mutations, can "percolate" up to have major populational effects. Interesting as this point may be it does not show any autonomous indeterminism of the evolutionary process. In the next two sections we investigate drift and natural selection as the locus of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  27. The Difference Between Selection and Drift: A Reply to Millstein. [REVIEW]Robert N. Brandon - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):153-170.
    Millstein [Bio. Philos. 17 (2002) 33] correctly identies a serious problem with the view that natural selection and random drift are not conceptually distinct. She offers a solution to this problem purely in terms of differences between the processes of selection and drift. I show that this solution does not work, that it leaves the vast majority of real biological cases uncategorized. However, I do think there is a solution to the problem she raises, and I offer it here. My (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  28.  18
    Kantian Ethics Almost Without Apology.Robert N. Johnson - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (4):594.
    Alas, you were at a Kant conference—or many philosophers’ idea of one—and if you are shocked, perhaps you are not a Kantian. For this scenario illustrates two fundamental criticisms of Kant’s vision of morality as “duty”: It is outrageous to hold that even for the hero “all the good he can ever perform still is merely duty”. And those who, like these parents, are moved to every morally significant action by a sense of duty are, far from exemplary, morally repugnant. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  29.  9
    The Structure of Biological Science.Robert N. Brandon - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):224-227.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  30.  23
    The Principle of Drift: Biology’s First Law.Robert N. Brandon - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy 103 (7):319-335.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  31. Time is of the Essence: Explanatory Pluralism and Accommodating Theories About Long-Term Processes.Robert N. McCauley - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (5):611-635.
    Unified, all-purpose, philosophical models of reduction in science lack resources for capturing varieties of cross-scientific relations that have proven critical to understanding some scientific achievements. Not only do those models obscure the distinction between successional and cross-scientific relations, their preoccupations with the structures of both theories and things provide no means for accommodating the contributions to various sciences of theories and research about long-term diachronic processes involving large-scale, distributed systems. Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is the parade case. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  32.  48
    The Levels of Selection.Robert N. Brandon - 1982 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:315 - 323.
    In this paper Wimsatt's analysis of units of selection is taken as defining the units of selection question. A definition of levels of selection is offered and it is shown that the levels of selection question is quite different from the units of selection question. Some of the relations between units and levels are briefly explored. It is argued that the levels of selection question is the question relevant to explanatory concerns, and it is suggested that it is the question (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  33.  54
    Weakness Incorporated.Robert N. Johnson - 1998 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (3):349 - 367.
    Kant held that “an incentive can determine the will [Willkür] to action only so far as the individual has incorporated it into his maxim”, a view dubbed the “Incorporation Thesis” by Henry Allison (hereafter, “IT”). Although many see IT as basic to Kant’s views on agency, it also seems irreconcilable with the possibility of a kind of weakness, the kind exhibited by a person who acts on incentives that run contrary to principles she holds dear. The problem is this: According (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  34.  51
    Difficult Hospital Inpatient Discharge Decisions: Ethical, Legal and Clinical Practice Issues.Robert N. Swidler, Terese Seastrum & Wayne Shelton - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (3):23 – 28.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  35.  56
    Intertheoretic Relations and the Future of Psychology.Robert N. McCauley - 1986 - Philosophy of Science 53 (June):179-99.
    In the course of defending both a unified model of intertheoretic relations in science and scientific realism, Paul Churchland has attempted to reinvigorate eliminative materialism. Churchland's eliminativism operates on three claims: (1) that some intertheoretic contexts involve incommensurable theories, (2) that such contexts invariably require the elimination of one theory or the other, and (3) that the relation of psychology and neuroscience is just such a context. I argue that a more detailed account of intertheoretic relations, which distinguishes between the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  36. Nonlocal Influences and Possible Worlds—A Stapp in the Wrong Direction.Robert K. Clifton, Jeremy N. Butterfield & Michael L. G. Redhead - 1990 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (1):5-58.
    give a proof of the existence of nonlocal influences acting on correlated spin-1/2 particles in the singlet state which does not require any particular interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM). (Except Stapp holds that the proof fails under a many-worlds interpretation of QM—a claim we analyse in 1.2.) Recently, in responding to Redhead's ([1987], pp. 90-6) criticism that the Stapp 1 proof fails under an indeterministic interpretation of QM, Stapp [1989] (henceforth Stapp 2), has revised the logical structure of his proof (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  37. Cognitive Science and the Naturalness of Religion.Robert N. McCauley & Emma Cohen - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (9):779-792.
  38. The Units of Selection Revisited: The Modules of Selection. [REVIEW]Robert N. Brandon - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (2):167-180.
    Richard Lewontin's (1970) early work on the units of selection initiated the conceptual and theoretical investigations that have led to the hierarchical perspective on selection that has reached near consensus status today. This paper explores other aspects of his work, work on what he termed continuity and quasi-independence, that connect to contemporary explorations of modularity in development and evolution. I characterize such modules and argue that they are the true units of selection in that they are what evolution by natural (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  39.  11
    Narrative Models of Action and Interaction.Robert Beaugrande & Benjamin N. Colby - 1979 - Cognitive Science 3 (1):43-66.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  40.  32
    Recent Trends in the Cognitive Science of Religion: Neuroscience, Religious Experience, and the Confluence of Cognitive and Evolutionary Research.Robert N. McCauley - 2020 - Zygon 55 (1):97-124.
  41. Epistemology in an Age of Cognitive Science.Robert N. McCauley - 1988 - Philosophical Psychology 1 (2):143-152.
    Abstract Like the logical empiricists many contemporary philosophers wish to bring the determinateness of scientific judgment to epistemology. Recent efforts to naturalise epistemology (such as those of the Churchlands) seem to jeopardise the position of epistemology as a normative discipline. Putnam argues that attempts to naturalise epistemology are self?refuting. My goal is not to defeat the project for the naturalisation of epistemology, but rather to help clarify what it does and does not amount to. I maintain that attempts to completely (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42.  25
    A General Case for Functional Pluralism.Robert N. Brandon - 2013 - In Philippe Huneman (ed.), Functions: Selection and Mechanisms. Springer. pp. 97--104.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  43.  44
    What's Wrong with the Emergentist Statistical Interpretation of Natural Selection and Random Drift.Robert N. Brandon & Grant Ramsey - 2007 - In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 66--84.
  44.  13
    Harold N. Lee 1899-1990.Louise N. Roberts & Andrew J. Reck - 1991 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 64 (5):68 - 69.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  3
    ``Virtue and Right&Quot.Robert N. Johnson - 2003 - Ethics 113 (4):810--834.
  46.  25
    Teaching the Conceptual Revolutions in Geometry.Robert N. Carson & Stuart Rowlands - 2007 - Science & Education 16 (9-10):921-954.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  47.  63
    Value and Autonomy in Kantian Ethics.Robert N. Johnson - 2007 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics. Clarendon Press.
  48.  83
    Theory and Experiment in Evolutionary Biology.Robert N. Brandon - 1994 - Synthese 99 (1):59 - 73.
  49. Kant's Conception of Merit.Robert N. Johnson - 1996 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77:310.
    It is standard to attribute to Kant the view that actions from motives other than duty deserve no positive moral evaluation. I argue that the standard view is mistaken. Kant's account of merit in the Metaphysics of Morals shows that he believes actions not performed from duty can be meritorious. Moreover, the grounds for attributing merit to an action are different from those for attributing moral worth to it. This is significant because it shows both that his views are reasonably (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50.  1
    Biology’s First Law: The Tendency for Diversity and Complexity to Increase in Evolutionary Systems.Daniel W. McShea & Robert N. Brandon - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    1 The Zero-Force Evolutionary Law 2 Randomness, Hierarchy, and Constraint 3 Diversity 4 Complexity 5 Evidence, Predictions, and Tests 6 Philosophical Foundations 7 Implications.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000