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  1.  25
    A History of Universalism: Conceptions of the Internationality of Science From the Enlightenment to the Cold War. [REVIEW]Geert J. Somsen - 2008 - Minerva 46 (3):361-379.
    That science is fundamentally universal has been proclaimed innumerable times. But the precise geographical meaning of this universality has changed historically. This article examines conceptions of scientific internationalism from the Enlightenment to the Cold War, and their varying relations to cosmopolitanism, nationalism, socialism, and ‘the West’. These views are confronted with recent tendencies to cast science as a uniquely European product.
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  2.  29
    Value-Laden Science: Jan Burgers and Scientific Politics in the Netherlands. [REVIEW]Geert J. Somsen - 2008 - Minerva 46 (2):231-245.
    The political engagement of scientists is not necessarily left-wing, and even when it is, it can take widely varying forms. This is illustrated by the specific character of Dutch scientific activism in the 1930s and 40s, which took shape in a society where ‘pillarized’ social divisions were more important than horizontal class structure. This paper examines how, within this context, the Delft physicist Jan Burgers developed a version of scientific politics, built on a philosophy of value-laden science.
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  3.  45
    The Young J. H. Van 'T Hoff: The Background to the Publication of His 1874 Pamphlet on the Tetrahedral Carbon Atom, Together with a New English Translation.Peter J. Ramberg & Geert J. Somsen - 2001 - Annals of Science 58 (1):51-74.
    J. H. van 't Hoff's 1874 Dutch pamphlet, in which he proposed the spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule, is one of the most significant documents in the history of chemistry. This essay presents a new narrative of Van 't Hoff's early life and places the appearance of the pamphlet within the context of the 'second golden age' of Dutch science. We argue that the combination of the reformed educational system in The Netherlands, the emergence of graphical molecular modelling (...)
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