6 found
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  1.  4
    The Intuitive Mind.Geir Overskeid - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):414-414.
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  2.  19
    Thinking is a Difficult Habit to Break.Geir Overskeid - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):138-139.
    Self-control is in the eye of the beholder. However, we speak of if a person has come to think conscious thoughts that change the motivational value of stimuli in the outside world. It is claimed that conscious thinking, and not habits bordering on compulsion, is behind self-control.
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  3.  67
    Psychological Hedonism and the Nature of Motivation: Bertrand Russell's Anhedonic Desires.Geir Overskeid - 2002 - Philosophical Psychology 15 (1):77 – 93.
    Understanding the causes of behavior is one of philosophy's oldest challenges. In analyzing human desires, Bertrand Russell's position was clearly related to that of psychological hedonism. Still, though he seems to have held quite consistently that desires and emotions govern human behavior, he claimed that they do not necessarily do so by making us want to maximize pleasure. This claim is related to several being made in today's psychology and philosophy. I point out a string of facts and arguments indicating (...)
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  4.  7
    Do We Need the Environment to Explain Operant Behavior?Geir Overskeid - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  5.  1
    Power and Autistic Traits.Geir Overskeid - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  6.  24
    What is Special About “Implicit” and “Explicit”?Geir Overskeid - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):780-780.
    Dienes & Perner present a very interesting analysis of two types of knowledge. It is not clear, however, that the words “implicit” and “explicit” are the best basis on which to build a theory of the two types of knowledge. One is also left uncertain as to whether this theory is the best way of ordering the greatest possible amount of relevant data in a way that yields the simplest account possible.
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