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  1.  24
    Do Rats Have Orgasms?James G. Pfaus, Tina Scardochio, Mayte Parada, Christine Gerson, Gonzalo R. Quintana & Genaro A. Coria-Avila - 2016 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
    BackgroundAlthough humans experience orgasms with a degree of statistical regularity, they remain among the most enigmatic of sexual responses; difficult to define and even more difficult to study empirically. The question of whether animals experience orgasms is hampered by similar lack of definition and the additional necessity of making inferences from behavioral responses.MethodHere we define three behavioral criteria, based on dimensions of the subjective experience of human orgasms described by Mah and Binik, to infer orgasm-like responses in other species: 1) (...)
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  2.  13
    The Role of Orgasm in the Development and Shaping of Partner Preferences.Genaro A. Coria-Avila, Deissy Herrera-Covarrubias, Nafissa Ismail & James G. Pfaus - 2016 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
    BackgroundThe effect of orgasm on the development and shaping of partner preferences may involve a catalysis of the neurochemical mechanisms of bonding. Therefore, understanding such process is relevant for neuroscience and psychology.MethodsA systematic review was carried out using the terms Orgasm, Sexual Reward, Partner Preference, Pair Bonding, Brain, Learning, Sex, Copulation.ResultsIn humans, concentrations of arousing neurotransmitters and potential bonding neurotransmitters increase during orgasm in the cerebrospinal fluid and the bloodstream. Similarly, studies in animals indicate that those neurotransmitters and others modulate (...)
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    The Role of Conditioning on Heterosexual and Homosexual Partner Preferences in Rats.Genaro A. Coria-Avila - 2012 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Partner preferences are expressed by many social species, including humans. They are commonly observed as selective contacts with an individual, more time spent together, and directed courtship behavior that leads to selective copulation. This review discusses the effect of conditioning on the development of heterosexual and homosexual partner preferences in rodents. Learned preferences may develop when a conditioned stimulus (CS) is associated in contingency with an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) that functions as a reinforcer. Consequently, an individual may display preference for (...)
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