Results for 'Genealogy'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. The Role of Life in the Genealogy.Nadeem J. Z. Hussain - 2011 - In Simon May (ed.), The Cambridge Guide to Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality. Cambridge University Press. pp. 142-69.
    In THE GENEALOGY OF MORALITY Nietzsche assess the value of the value judgments of morality from the perspective of human flourishing. His positive descriptions of the “higher men” he hopes for and the negative descriptions of the decadent humans he thinks morality unfortunately supports both point to a particular substantive conception of what such flourishing comes to. The Genealogy, however, presents us with a puzzle: why does Nietzsche’s own evaluative standard not receive a genealogical critique? The answer to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. The Relevance of History for Moral Philosophy: A Study of Nietzsche's Genealogy.Paul Katsafanas - 2011 - In Simon May (ed.), Nietzsche's 'On the Genealogy of Morality': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    The Genealogy takes a historical form. But does the history play an essential role in Nietzsche's critique of modern morality? In this essay, I argue that the answer is yes. The Genealogy employs history in order to show that acceptance of modern morality was causally responsible for producing a dramatic change in our affects, drives, and perceptions. This change led agents to perceive actual increases in power as reductions in power, and actual decreases in power as increases in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. Contingency and Necessity in the Genealogy of Morality.Paul di Georgio - 2013 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2013 (162):97-111.
    Excerpt: In this essay I explore the nature of the necessity of historical development in Nietzsche’s genealogy of Judeo-Christian moral values. I argue that the progression of moral stages in Nietzsche’s study is ordered in such a way that the failure of each stage is logically and structurally necessary, that each failure structures the resultant system or paradigm, but that the historical manifestation of moral paradigms coinciding with predicted or projected theoretical structures is contingent upon a multitude of other (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  25
    Nietzsche’s Pragmatic Genealogy of Justice.Matthieu Queloz - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):727-749.
    This paper analyses the connection between Nietzsche’s early employment of the genealogical method and contemporary neo-pragmatism. The paper has two goals. On the one hand, by viewing Nietzsche’s writings in the light of neo-pragmatist ideas and reconstructing his approach to justice as a pragmatic genealogy, it seeks to bring out an under-appreciated aspect of his genealogical method which illustrates how genealogy can be used to vindicate rather than to subvert, and accounts for Nietzsche’s lack of historical references. On (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Genealogy Revisited. [REVIEW]Mark Alfano - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    “Another Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality?” one might be excused for asking at the sight of Simon May’s new collection. This volume has to contend for shelf space with homonymic monographs by Lawrence Hatab (2008) and David Owen (2007), as well as Daniel Conway’s (2008) Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, a compilation of the same name edited by Christa Acampora (2006), and Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality (2002). Add to this that Hatab contributes to May’s collection, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. What is Genealogy?Mark Bevir - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):263-275.
    This paper offers a theory of genealogy, explaining its rise in the nineteenth century, its epistemic commitments, its nature as critique, and its place in the work of Nietzsche and Foucault. The crux of the theory is recognition of genealogy as an expression of a radical historicism, rejecting both appeals to transcendental truths and principles of unity or progress in history, and embracing nominalism, contingency, and contestability. In this view, genealogies are committed to the truth of radical historicism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  3
    Making Nietzsche’s Thought Groan: The History of Racisms and Foucault’s Genealogy of Nietzschean Genealogy in “Society Must Be Defended”.Robert Bernasconi - 2017 - Research in Phenomenology 47 (2):153-174.
    _ Source: _Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 153 - 174 In 1976, in “_Society Must be Defended_,” Foucault did more than offer an alternative genealogy of his own genealogical perspective to the one he is sometimes taken to have provided in “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History.” He also, by implication, located Nietzsche within that genealogy, one result of which is that he gave what amounts to a new perspective on how Nietzsche might be placed within the history of racisms.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  55
    Foucault Contra Habermas: Recasting the Dialogue Between Genealogy and Critical Theory.Samantha Ashenden & David Owen (eds.) - 1999 - Sage Publications.
    Foucault contra Habermas is an incisive examination of, and a comprehensive introduction to, the debate between Foucault and Habermas over the meaning of enlightenment and modernity. It reprises the key issues in the argument between critical theory and genealogy and is organised around three complementary themes: defining the context of the debate; examining the theoretical and conceptual tools used; and discussing the implications for politics and criticism. In a detailed reply to Habermas' Philosophical Discourse of Modernity, this volume explains (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9. Understanding Genealogy: History, Power, and the Self.Martin Saar - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):295-314.
    The aim of this article is to clarify the relation between genealogy and history and to suggest a methodological reading of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. I try to determine genealogy's specific range of objects, specific mode of explication, and specific textual form. Genealogies in general can be thought of as drastic narratives of the emergence and transformations of forms of subjectivity related to power, told with the intention to induce doubt and self-reflection in exactly those readers whose (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  16
    Arendt’s Genealogy of Thinking.Justin Pack - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):151-164.
    This paper presents what I will call Arendt’s genealogy of thinking. My purpose in doing so is to strengthen Arendt’s critique of thoughtlessness which I believe is both a powerful, but underappreciated analytic tool and a consistent, but under-examined thread that occurs throughout Arendt’s oeuvre. To do so I revisit her phenomenology of thinking and the distinction between thinking and cognition she introduces in her last, unfinished work, The Life of the Mind. When read alongside the genealogy of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Genealogy, Phenomenology, Critical Theory.David Couzens Hoy - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):276-294.
    This paper explains the genealogical method as it is understood and employed in contemporary Continental philosophy. Using a pair of terms from Bernard Williams, genealogy is contrasted with phenomenology as an `unmasking' as opposed to a `vindicatory' method. The genealogical method is also compared with the method of Ideologiekritik and recent critical theory. Although genealogy is usually thought to be allergic to universals, in fact Foucault, Derrida, and Bourdieu do not shun universals, even if they approach them with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Genealogy as Critique?Tyler Krupp - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):315-337.
    This essay explores whether, and how, genealogy might remain critical within anti-foundationalist philosophical contexts. While adherents of genealogy often presume that genealogy simply is inherently critical in any context, adherents of historicized forms of anti-foundationalist philosophy might rightly wonder whether genealogy can continue to serve any critical purpose whatsoever. Is genealogy a form of historical inquiry that can be done away with once a shift has been made towards historicized forms of anti-foundationalist philosophy? Why continue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  90
    Foucault's Historiographical Expansion: Adding Genealogy to Archaeology.Colin Koopman - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):338-362.
    This paper offers a rereading of Foucault's much-disputed mid-career historiographical shift to genealogy from his earlier archaeological analytic. Disputing the usual view that this shift involves an abandonment of an archaeological method that was then replaced by a genealogical method, I show that this shift is better conceived as a historiographical expansion. Foucault's work subsequent to this shift should be understood as invoking both genealogy and archaeology. The metaphor of expansion is helpful in clarifying what was involved in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  57
    Genealogy and Governmentality.Thomas Biebricher - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):363-396.
    The essay aims at an assessment of whether and to what extent the history of governmentality can be considered to be a genealogy. To this effect a generic account of core tenets of Foucauldian genealogy is developed. The three core tenets highlighted are (1) a radically contingent view of history that is (2) expressed in a distinct style and (3) highlights the impact of power on this history. After a brief discussion of the concept of governmentality and a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  40
    Nietzschean Genealogy and Hegelian History in "The Genealogy of Morals".Philip J. Kain - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):123-147.
    I argue that in the Genealogy of Morals, Nietzsche does not simply embrace master morality and spurn slave morality, nor does the Übermensch develop out of, or on the model of, the master, rather than the slave. To make the case for all of this, I explore the relationship between Hegel's master-slave dialectic and the conflict Nietzsche sees between master morality and slave morality. I argue that Nietzsche is very much influenced by Hegel and that Nietzschean genealogy and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  53
    Genealogy of Morality and Law.José Antonio Marina - 2000 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (3):303-325.
    In order to clarify the relationship between morality and law, it is necessary to define both concepts precisely. Cultural realities refer to concepts which are more specifically defined if we focus towards the genealogy of those realities, that is to say, their motivation, function and aim. Should we start from legal anthropology, comparative law and history of law, law arises as a social technique which coactively imposes ways of solving conflicts, protecting fundamental values for a society's co-existence. Values subject (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  35
    Nietzsche's 'Interpretation' in the Genealogy.Reid D. Blackman - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (4):693-711.
    Nietzsche, Genealogy, In the preface of On the Genealogy of Morality (GM), Nietzsche tells us the third treatise of his book is an “interpretation” of the aphorism placed at the beginning of that treatise. Much work – primarily by John Wilcox, Maudemarie Clark, and Christopher Janaway – has gone into proving that the aphorism is not the quotation from Zarathustra placed at the beginning of the treatise, but that it is Section 1 (perhaps minus the last few lines) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  16
    The difference between genealogy and phenomenology: the case of religion in Nietzsche and Levinas. [Spanish].William Large - 2004 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 2:108-123.
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This article deals with the difference between phenomenology and genealogy. First it explains briefly what phenomenology is, as proposed by Husserl. Then it proposes the issue of religion, specially the concept of God, as seen by (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  19
    Dead Questions and Vicarious Understandings: Questioning Gadamer's Genealogy.Nicholas Jardine - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (1):63-78.
    Gadamer's Truth and Method emphasises the priority of engagement with questions in the process of interpretation; however, there are passages which appear dismissive of concerns with 'dead' scientific and philosophical questions. Here I argue that Gadamer's work is nevertheless an important resource for the historical study of the genesis and dissolution of questions. This type of study can overcome the divide between internal history of contents and external history of contexts. In both philosophy and the sciences, reflection on the (...) of questions is, I suggest, crucial for our critical awareness of current methods and agendas. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Towards a Post-Modern Understanding of the Political: From Genealogy to Hermeneutics.Andrius Bielskis - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    While claiming that liberalism is the dominant political theory and practice of modernity, this book provides two alternative post modern theoretical approaches to the political. Concentrating on Nietzsche's and Foucault's work, it offers a novel interpretation of their genealogical projects. It argues that genealogy can be applied to analyze different forms of cultural kitsch vis-à-vis the dominant political institutions of consumer capitalism. The problem with consumer capitalism is not so much that it exploits individuals, but that it fosters cheap (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  32
    Genealogy as Critique: Foucault and the Problems of Modernity.Colin Koopman - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
    Viewing Foucault in the light of work by Continental and American philosophers, most notably Nietzsche, Habermas, Deleuze, Richard Rorty, Bernard Williams, and Ian Hacking, Genealogy as Critique shows that philosophical genealogy involves not only the critique of modernity but also its transformation. Colin Koopman engages genealogy as a philosophical tradition and a method for understanding the complex histories of our present social and cultural conditions. He explains how our understanding of Foucault can benefit from productive dialogue with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  12
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Hermeneutics, Genealogy, Critical Theory.Yvonne Sherratt - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and Habermas, she also contextualizes contemporary (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  61
    Steps to an Ecology of Knowledge: Continuity and Change in the Genealogy of Knowledge.Axel Gelfert - 2011 - Episteme 8 (1):67-82.
    The present paper argues for a more complete integration between recent "genealogical" approaches to the problem of knowledge and evolutionary accounts of the development of human cognitive capacities and practices. A structural tension is pointed out between, on the one hand, the fact that the explicandum of genealogical stories is a specifically human trait and, on the other hand, the tacit acknowledgment, shared by all contributors to the debate, that human beings have evolved from non-human beings. Since humans differ from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  24. Review Essay of Racism and Sexual Oppression in Anglo-America: A Genealogy by Ladelle McWhorter and The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections by Licia Carlson. [REVIEW]Shelley Tremain - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):440-445.
  25. History in the Service of Life: Nietzsche's 'Genealogy'.Allison Merrick - 2013 - In S. Campbell & P. Bruno (eds.), The Science, Politics, and Ontology of Life-Philosophy. Bloomsbury Academic.
  26. How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche's Genealogy?Lawrence J. Hatab - 2008 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 35 (1):106-123.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. The Genealogy of Psychoanalysis.Michel Henry - 1993
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  28.  21
    Michel Foucault: Genealogy as Critique.Rudi Visker - 1995 - Verso.
    Rudi Visker's book is not only a lucid and elegant survey of Foucault's corpus, from his early work on madness to the History of Sexuality, but also a major intervention in this debate.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29. Starting with Foucault: An Introduction to Genealogy.C. G. Prado - 2000 - Westview Press.
    Michel Foucault had a great influence upon a wide range of disciplines, and his work has been widely interpreted and is frequently referred to, but it is often difficult for beginners to find their way into the complexities of his thought. This is especially true for readers whose background is Anglo-American or "analytic" philosophy. C. G. Prado argues in this updated introduction that the time is overdue for Anglo-American philosophers to avail themselves of what Foucault offers. In this clear and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  58
    In Defense of Nietzschean Genealogy.Andrew Jason Cohen - 1999 - Philosophical Forum 30 (4):269–288.
    Using Alasdair MacIntyre as a foil, I defend what I take to be a viable Nietzschean genealogical account, showing that a proper perspectivism is neither perniciously subjectivist nor absolutist. I begin by arguing against MacIntyre’s assertion that genealogists are committed to the view that rationality requires neutrality and that as there is no neutrality, there is no rationality. I then continue by offering something of a reconstruction of Nietzsche’s view, designed partly to clarify the error pinpointed in MacIntyre’s arguments, but (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  41
    Foucault's Genealogy and Teaching Multiculturalism as a Subversive Activity.Y. Kazmi - 1997 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (3):331-345.
  32.  9
    Problematize and Reconstruct: Foucault, Genealogy, and Critique.Sarin Marchetti - 2015 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 36 (1):199-231.
  33.  7
    Questioning Cloning with Genealogy.Emmanuel Ifeanyi Ani - 2013 - Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):376-379.
    I evaluate a hypothetical society of human clones. Cloning implies the production of exact copies of an organism from a replication of one of the organism’s cells without any recourse to the genealogical protocol of male and female reproduction. I thus pose the question: Can we regard a cloned copy of Mr. James as a son of Mr. James or Mr. James once again? I consider certain implications of human cloning to the concepts of individual uniqueness, and thus of genealogical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  12
    A Genealogy of the Ridiculous: From 'Humours' to Humour.Brenda Goldberg - 1999 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 1 (1):59-71.
    We tend to take the phenomenon of humour for granted, seeing it for the most part as something innately and fundamentally human. However we might go even further than this, and say that the phenomenon of humour is perceived as an essential part of what makes us human. In this respect, philosophers and theorists as wide apart as Aristotle and the French, feminist Julia Kristeva (1980; also see Goldberg, 1999a) have regarded a baby's ability to laugh as one of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  3
    22. Self-Knowledge, Genealogy, Evolution.Paolo Stellino - 2015 - In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter. pp. 550-573.
  36.  7
    Whakapapa, Genealogy and Genetics.Donald Evans - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (4):182-190.
    This paper provides part of an analysis of the use of the Maori term whakapapa in a study designed to test the compatibility and commensurability of views of members of the indigenous culture of New Zealand with other views of genetic technologies extant in the country. It is concerned with the narrow sense of whakapapa as denoting biological ancestry, leaving the wider sense of whakapapa as denoting cultural identity for discussion elsewhere. The phenomenon of genetic curiosity is employed to facilitate (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  56
    Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy.Bernard Williams - 2002 - Princeton: New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
    "In this exceptionally brilliant book, ranging effortlessly from Herodotus and Thucydides to Diderot and Nietzsche, Bernard Williams daringly asks--and still more daringly answers--one of the central questions of philosophy: what is the ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   135 citations  
  38. On the Genealogy of Morality.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Friedrich Nietzsche is one of the most influential thinkers of the past 150 years and On the Genealogy of Morality (1887) is his most important work on ethics and politics. A polemical contribution to moral and political theory, it offers a critique of moral values and traces the historical evolution of concepts such as guilt, conscience, responsibility, law and justice. This is a revised and updated edition of one of the most successful volumes to appear in Cambridge Texts in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   53 citations  
  39. The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism.Cornel West - 1989 - University of Wisconsin Press.
    Taking Emerson as his starting point, Cornel West’s basic task in this ambitious enterprise is to chart the emergence, development, decline, and recent resurgence of American pragmatism. John Dewey is the central figure in West’s pantheon of pragmatists, but he treats as well such varied mid-century representatives of the tradition as Sidney Hook, C. Wright Mills, W. E. B. Du Bois, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Lionel Trilling. West’s "genealogy" is, ultimately, a very personal work, for it is imbued throughout with (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   34 citations  
  40. On The Genealogy Of Norms: A Case For The Role Of Emotion In Cultural Evolution.Shaun Nichols - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (2):234-255.
    One promising way to investigate the genealogy of norms is by considering not the origin of norms, but rather, what makes certain norms more likely to prevail. Emotional responses, I maintain, constitute one important set of mechanisms that affects the cultural viability of norms. To corroborate this, I exploit historical evidence indicating that 16th century etiquette norms prohibiting disgusting actions were much more likely to survive than other 16th century etiquette norms. This case suggests more broadly that work on (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  41. Towards a Genealogy of the Metaphysics of Sight: Seeing, Hearing, and Thinking in Heraclitus and Parmenides.Jussi Backman - 2015 - In Antonio Cimino & Pavlos Kontos (eds.), Phenomenology and the Metaphysics of Sight. Brill. pp. 11-34.
    The paper outlines a tentative genealogy of the Platonic metaphysics of sight by thematizing pre-Platonic thought, particularly Heraclitus and Parmenides. By “metaphysics of sight” it understands the features of Platonic-Aristotelian metaphysics expressed with the help of visual metaphors. It is argued that the Platonic metaphysics of sight can be regarded as the result of a synthesis of the Heraclitean and Parmenidean approaches. In pre-Platonic thought, the visual paradigm is still marginal. For Heraclitus, the basic structure of being is its (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche's Genealogy.Christopher Janaway - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Nietzsche's aims and targets -- Reading Nietzsche's preface -- Naturalism and genealogy -- Selflessness : the struggle with Schopenhauer -- Nietzsche and Paul Rée on the origins of moral feelings -- Good and evil : affect, artistry, and revaluation -- Free will, autonomy, and the sovereign individual -- Guilt, bad conscience, and self-punishment -- Will to power in the Genealogy -- Nietzsche's illustration of the art of exegesis -- Disinterestedness and objectivity -- Perspectival knowing and the affects -- (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  43.  31
    Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality.David Owen - 2007 - McGill-Queen's University Press/Acumen.
    Combining philosophical acuity, psychological insight and a remarkably powerful prose style, On the Genealogy of Morality is a dazzling and brilliantly incisive attack on European morality. David Owen situates the Genealogy in the context of the development of Nietzsche's philosophy and offers readers a sophisticated and nuanced analysis of this great text. He provides a lucid account of Nietzsche’s reasons for adopting a “genealogical” investigation of our moral values as well as a detailed analysis of the Genealogy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  44.  50
    Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology.Conor Cunningham - 2002 - Routledge.
    Nihilism is the logic of nothing as something, which claims that Nothing Is. Its unmaking of things, and its forming of formless things, strain the fundamental terms of existence: what it is to be, to know, to be known. But nihilism, the antithesis of God, is also like theology. Where nihilism creates nothingness, condenses it to substance, God also makes nothingness creative. Negotiating the borders of spirit and substance, theology can ask the questions of nihilism that other disciplines do not (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45.  76
    The Genealogy of Epistemic Virtue Concepts.Alan Thomas - 2008 - Philosophical Papers 37 (3):345-369.
    Abstract This paper examines the treatment of thick ethical concepts in Williams's work in order to evaluate the consistency of his treatment of ethical and epistemic concepts and to assess whether the idea of a thick concept can be extended from ethics to epistemology. A virtue epistemology is described modeled on a cognitivist virtue ethics. Williams's genealogy of the virtues surrounding propositional knowledge (the virtues of ?truthfulness?) is critically evaluated. It is concluded that this genealogy is an important (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  46.  9
    Inventions of Teaching: A Genealogy.Brent Davis - 2004 - L. Erlbaum Associates.
    Inventions of Teaching: A Genealogy is a powerful examination of current metaphors for and synonyms of teaching. It offers an account of the varied and conflicting influences and conceptual commitments that have contributed to contemporary vocabularies--and that are in some ways maintained by those vocabularies, in spite of inconsistencies and incompatibilities among popular terms. The concern that frames the book is how speakers of English invented (in the original sense of the word, "came upon") our current vocabularies for teaching. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  47.  73
    A Genealogy of the Modern State.Quentin Skinner - 2009 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 162, 2008 Lectures. pp. 325.
    This lecture presents the text of the speech about the genealogy of the modern state delivered by the author at the 2008 British Academy Lecture. It explains that to investigate the genealogy of the state is to discover that there has never been any agreed concept to which the word state has answered. The lecture suggests that any moral or political term that has become so deeply enmeshed in so many ideological disputes over such a long period of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  8
    Neoliberal Political Economy, Biopolitics and Colonialism: A Transcolonial Genealogy of Inequality.C. Venn - 2009 - Theory, Culture and Society 26 (6):206-233.
    Foucault’s analysis of the relation of power and the economy in the lectures given at the Collège de France between 1975 and 1979 opens up modern societies for a radically different interrogation of the relations of force inscribed in historically heterogeneous forms of wealth creation and distribution, but more specifically within the period of liberal capitalism. Its vast scope clears the ground for genealogies of power, political economy and race that demonstrate their intertwinement, yet he underplays several elements which have (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  49.  22
    Emmanuel Levinas: The Genealogy of Ethics.John Llewelyn - 1995 - Routledge.
    From the relative obscurity in which Levinas's work languished until very recently, Emmanuel Levinas must now be judged as one of the most influential figures in contemporary Continental philosophy. There is no better guide than John Lewelyn to lead one through the thickets of Levinas's prose. Bursting with questions, multiple references, cascading citations and multilingual puns and nuances, this book is the compelling record of intellectual obsession. Taking as its guiding thre the theme of genealogy, the book gives a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  50. The Second Treatise in in the Genealogy of Morality: Nietzsche on the Origin of the Bad Conscience.Mathias Risse - 2001 - European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):55–81.
    On a postcard to Franz Overbeck from January 4, 1888, Nietzsche makes some illuminating remarks with respect to the three treatises in his book On the Genealogy of Morality.2 Nietzsche says that, ‘for the sake of clarity, it was necessary artificially to isolate the different roots of that complex structure that is called morality. Each of these three treatises expresses a single primum mobile; a fourth and fifth are missing, as is even the most essential (‘the herd instinct’) – (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000