Results for 'Genocide'

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  1.  1
    Campbell, Joseph Keim, Michael O'Rourke, and Harry S. Silverstein (Eds), Knowledge and Skepticism, Cambridge, MA and London: MIT Press, 2010, Pp. Viii+ 367,£ 25.95/£ 51.95. Canfield, John V., Becoming Human: The Development of Language, Self, and Self-Consciousness, Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2007, Pp. Viii+ 186. [REVIEW]Claudia Card, Confronting Evils & Cambridge Genocide - 2010 - Mind 119:475.
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  2.  54
    Is There a Duty to Militarily Intervene to Stop a Genocide?Uwe Steinhoff - forthcoming - In Christian Neuhäuser & Christoph Schuck (eds.), Military Interventions: Considerations from Philosophy and Political Science.
    Is there is a moral obligation to militarily intervene in another state to stop a genocide from happening (if this can be done with proportionate force)? My answer is that under exceptional circumstances a state or even a non-state actor might have a duty to stop a genocide (for example if these actors have promised to do so), but under most circumstances there is no such obligation. To wit, “humanity,” states, collectives, and individuals do not have an obligation (...)
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  3.  12
    Genocide in Jewish Thought.David Patterson - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    1. Introduction: a name, not an essence -- 2. Why Jewish thought and what makes it Jewish? -- 3. Deadly philosophical abstraction -- 4. The stranger in your midst -- 5. Nefesh: the soul as flesh and blood -- 6. The environmentalist contribution to genocide -- 7. Torture -- 8. Hunger and homelessness -- 9. Philosophy, religion, and genocide -- 10. A concluding reflection on body and soul.
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  4. Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide.John K. Roth (ed.) - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Genocide is evil or nothing could be. It raises a host of questions about humanity, rights, justice, and reality, which are key areas of concern for philosophy. Strangely, however, philosophers have tended to ignore genocide. Even more problematic, philosophy and philosophers bear more responsibility for genocide than they have usually admitted. In Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide, an international group of twenty-five contemporary philosophers work to correct those deficiencies by showing how philosophy can and (...)
     
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  5.  26
    Reparations for Historical Human Rights Violations: The International and Historical Dimensions of the Alien Torts Claims Act Genocide Case of the Herero of Namibia. [REVIEW]Jeremy J. Sarkin & Carly Fowler - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (3):331-360.
    Between 1904 and 1908, German colonialists in German South West Africa (GSWA, known today as Namibia) committed genocide and other international crimes against two indigenous groups, the Herero and the Nama. From the late 1990s, the Herero have sought reparations from the German government and several German corporations for what occurred more than a hundred years ago. This article examines and contextualizes the issues concerning reparations for historical human rights claims. It describes and analyzes the events in GSWA at (...)
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  6.  23
    Easy to Remember?: Genocide and the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW]John Roth - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):31-42.
    Philosophers of religion have written a great deal about the problem of evil. Their reflections, however, have not concentrated, at least not extensively or sufficiently, on the particularities of evil that manifest themselves in genocide. Concentrating on some of those particularities, this essay reflects on genocide, which has sometimes been called the crime of crimes, to raise questions such as: how should genocide affect the philosophy of religion and what might philosophers of religion contribute to help check (...)
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  7.  45
    Collective Action and the Peculiar Evil of Genocide.Bill Wringe - 2006 - Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):376–392.
    There is a common intuition that genocide is qualitatively distinct from, and much worse than, mass murder. If we concentrate on the most obvious differences between genocidal killing and other cases of mass murder it is difficult to see why this should be the case. I argue that many cases of genocide involve not merely individual evil but a form of collective action manifesting a collective evil will. It is this that explains the moral distinctiveness of genocide. (...)
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  8.  69
    Ethical Criticism of the Bible: The Case of Divinely Mandated Genocide.Wes Morriston - 2012 - Sophia 51 (1):117-135.
    Taking as a test case biblical texts in which the God of Israel commands the destruction other nations, the present paper defends the legitimacy and the necessity of ethical criticism of the Bible. It takes issue with the suggestions of several contemporary Christian philosophers who have recently defended the view that (in Israel’s early history) God had good and morally sufficient reasons for commanding genocide.
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  9.  22
    Transitional Justice and “Genocide”: Practical Ethics for Genocide Narratives.Aleksandar Jokic - 2014 - Journal of Ethics 18 (1):23-46.
    In the wake of the Cold War a characteristic style of genocide narratives emerged in the West. For the most part, philosophers did not pay attention to this development even though they are uniquely qualified to address arguments and conceptual issues discussed in this burgeoning genocide genre. While ostensibly a response to a specific recent article belonging to the genre, this essay offers an outline of an ethics of genocide narratives in the form of four lessons on (...)
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  10. Studying Genocide: A Pragmatist Approach to Action-Engendering Discourse.Lynne Tirrell - 2013 - In Graham Hubbs & Douglas Lind (eds.), Pragmatism, Law, and Language. Routledge.
    Drawing on my recent work using inferential role semantics and elements of speech act theory to analyze the role of derogatory terms (a.k.a. ‘hate speech’, or ‘slurs’) in the 1994 genocide of the Tutsi in Rwanda, as well as the role of certain kinds of reparative speech acts in post-genocide Rwanda, this paper highlights key pragmatist commitments that inform the methods and goals of this practical analysis of real world events. In “Genocidal Language Games”, I used conceptual tools (...)
     
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  11.  17
    Lies, Damned Lies, and Genocide.Siobhan Nash-Marshall & Rita Mahdessian - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):116-144.
    This article analyzes the claim that “deliberate denial [of genocide] is a form of aggression that ought to be regarded as a contribution to genocidal violence in its own right.” Its objective is to demonstrate that the claim is substantially correct: there are instances of genocide negation that are genocidal acts. The article suggests that one such instance is contained in a letter sent to Professor Robert Jay Lifton by Turkey's ambassador to the United States. The article is (...)
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  12. “Transitional Justice in Post-Genocide Rwanda: An Integrative Approach”.Lynne Tirrell - 2015 - In Claudio Corradetti, Nir Eisikovits & Jack Rotondi (eds.), Theorizing Transitional Justice. Ashgate.
    An imperfect “politics of justice” seems to be inevitable in the aftermath of genocide. In Rwanda, this is especially true, given the scale of the atrocities, the breadth of participation, and the need to build a justice system from scratch while establishing security and restoring the rule of law. Official contexts for survivor testimony and corresponding perpetrator punishment are crucial for establishing shared norms and narratives, but these processes can destabilize social relations in important ways. Accordingly, without development, these (...)
     
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  13.  7
    Educating a New Generation: The Model of the “Genocide and Human Rights University Program”. [REVIEW]Joyce Apsel - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (4):465-486.
    This paper examines the design and teaching of "Genocide and Human Rights," an innovative, higher education course introduced in 2002 to provide training for a new generation of scholars and teachers. The course was developed and funded by a small non-profit organization, the Zoryan Institute, in Toronto, Canada. One purpose of the course is to teach about the Armenian genocide within a comparative genocide and human rights framework. Another goal is to fill a gap in the curriculum (...)
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  14.  7
    Broadening the Concept of Genocide in Lithuania's Criminal Law and the Principle Nullum Crimen Sine Lege.Justinas Žilinskas - 2009 - Jurisprudence 118 (4):333-348.
    The present article discusses the broadening of the concept of genocide in Lithuanian national criminal law with regard to the principle of nullum crimen sine lege. The broadened definition, which includes two groups, social and political raises serious problems when the national provisions on genocide are applied retroactively. However, in the case of Lithuania, such a broadening of the definition may be interpreted not as an introduction of distinct independent groups, but of groups that closely overlap with the (...)
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  15.  6
    Genocide Reconsidered: A Pragmatist Approach.Erik Schneiderhan - 2013 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (3):280-300.
    The recent literature on genocide shows signs of taking what might be called a “processual turn,” with genocide increasingly understood as a contingent process rather than a singular event. But while this second generation's turn may be clear to those within the literature, the theory guiding the change is insufficiently specified. The theory regarding process and contingency is implicit, and, as such, genocide theory does not realize its full generative potential. The primary goal of this article is (...)
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  16.  49
    Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide.Claudia Card - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this contribution to philosophical ethics, Claudia Card revisits the theory of evil developed in her earlier book The Atrocity Paradigm, and expands it to consider collectively perpetrated and collectively suffered atrocities. Redefining evil as a secular concept and focusing on the inexcusability - rather than the culpability - of atrocities, Card examines the tension between responding to evils and preserving humanitarian values. This stimulating and often provocative book contends that understanding the evils in terrorism, torture and genocide enables (...)
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  17. Genocide, Diversity, and John Dewey's Progressive Education.Marianna Papastephanou - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (4-5):627-655.
    This article discusses how John Dewey's “Report and Recommendation upon Turkish Education” and some of Dewey's related travel narratives reflect “civilizing mission” imperatives and involve multiple utopian operations that have not yet attracted political-philosophical attention. Such critical attention would reveal Dewey's misjudgments concerning issues of diversity, geopolitics, and global justice. Based on an ethicopolitical reading of the relevant sources, the aim here is to expose developmentalist and colonial vestiges, to raise searching questions, and to obtain a heightened view on the (...)
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  18. Claudia Card's Concept of Social Death: A New Way of Looking at Genocide.James Snow - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (4-5):607-626.
    Scholarship in the multidisciplinary field of genocide studies often emphasizes body counts and the number of biological deaths as a way of measuring and comparing the severity and scope of individual genocides. The prevalence of this way of framing genocide is problematic insofar it risks marginalizing the voices and experiences of victims who may not succumb to biological death but nevertheless suffer the loss of family members and other loved ones, and suffer the destruction of relationships, as well (...)
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  19.  11
    Between Genocide and “Genocide”.Berel Lang - 2011 - History and Theory 50 (2):285-294.
  20.  74
    Clarifying the Concept of Genocide.Mohammed Abed - 2006 - Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):308–330.
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  21.  39
    Genocide and the Moral Agency of Ethnic Groups.Karen Kovach - 2006 - Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):331–352.
  22.  64
    Acknowledging and Rectifying the Genocide of American Indians: "Why is It That They Carry Their Lives on Their Fingernails?".William C. Bradford - 2006 - Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):515–543.
  23.  8
    The Political Methodology of Genocide Denial.Elizabeth Strakosch - 2005 - Dialogue 3 (3):1-23.
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  24. Genocide and Social Death.Claudia Card - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):63-79.
    : Social death, central to the evil of genocide (whether the genocide is homicidal or primarily cultural), distinguishes genocide from other mass murders. Loss of social vitality is loss of identity and thereby of meaning for one's existence. Seeing social death at the center of genocide takes our focus off body counts and loss of individual talents, directing us instead to mourn losses of relationships that create community and give meaning to the development of talents.
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  25.  23
    The Roots and Prevention of Genocide and Related Mass Violence.Ervin Staub - 2012 - Zygon 47 (4):821-842.
    Genocide and mass violence originate in difficult life conditions, conflict between groups, and cultural characteristics such as a history of devaluation of a group, victimization, and overly strong respect for authority. These can join in creating uncertainty and fear, frustrating the fulfillment of basic psychological needs, and shaping destructive psychological reactions and social processes such as scapegoating and destructive ideologies. The evolution of increasing hostility and violence can follow, allowed by the passivity of internal and external bystanders. Halting (...) and mass violence is very difficult. It is more effective to focus on early prevention: responding to difficult life conditions, developing positive attitudes and constructive ideologies that humanize the “other”; dialogue; healing wounds and memories of past victimization; training about the roots, psychological impact, and prevention of violence in workshops and the media; and supporting development practices and democratization. Early prevention requires leadership in the United Nations, the work of NGOs, cooperating national governments, and citizen groups of active bystanders. (shrink)
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  26.  4
    Genocide and Social Death.Claudia Card - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):63-79.
    Social death, central to the evil of genocide, distinguishes genocide from other mass murders. Loss of social vitality is loss of identity and thereby of meaning for one's existence. Seeing social death at the center of genocide takes our focus off body counts and loss of individual talents, directing us instead to mourn losses of relationships that create community and give meaning to the development of talents.
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  27.  24
    Genocide and Sexual Atrocities: Hannah Arendt's Eichmann in Jerusalem and Karadžić in New York.Natalie Nenadic - 2011 - Philosophical Topics 39 (2):117-144.
    International law has recently recognized that sexual atrocities can be acts of genocide. This precedent was pioneered through a landmark lawsuit in New York against Radovan Karadžić, head of the Bosnian Serbs (Kadic v. Karadzic , 1993-2000), a case in which I played a central role. I argue that we may situate this development philosophically in relation to Hannah Arendt's Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil . She aims to secure a better understanding of (...) than was achieved at the Nuremberg Trials (1945) and at the Eichmann trial (1961). Arendt claims that these trials were limited by formalism because they applied familiar paradigms onto these new experiences in a manner that obscured what was distinctive about them and that demanded original thinking and a new paradigm. Nuremberg obscured genocide by miscasting it as a traditional "war crime," a problem that the Jerusalem court exposed but could have better clarified. Through a first-hand account, I show how we too had to secure a new paradigm by treating the facts on their own terms and coining the crime as "genocidal rape." We had to wrest this paradigm from a prevailing approach that also formally applied the category of "war crimes" onto these experiences in a way that obscured them and interfered with justice. (shrink)
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  28.  59
    Complicity and the Rwandan Genocide.Larry May - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (2):135-152.
    The Rwandan genocide of 1994 occurred due to widespread complicity. I will argue that complicity can be the basis for legal liability, even for criminal liability, if two conditions are met. First, the person’s actions or inactions must be causally efficacious at least in the sense that had the person not committed these actions or inactions the harm would have been made significantly less likely to occur. Second, the person must know that her actions or inactions risk contributing to (...)
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  29.  10
    An Alternative Approach to the Harm of Genocide.Christopher Macleod - unknown
    It is a widely shared belief that genocide – the ‘crime of crimes’– is more morally significant than ‘mere’ large-scale mass murder. Various attempts have been made to capture that separate evil of genocide: some have attempted to locate it in damage done to individuals, while others have focused upon the harm done to collectives. In this article, I offer a third, neglected, option. Genocide damages humankind: it is here that the difference is to be found. I (...)
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  30.  19
    Bringing Reflective Judgement Into International Relations: Exploring the Rwandan Genocide.Naomi Head - 2010 - Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):191-204.
    This article explores the role of reflective judgement in international relations through the lens of the Rwandan genocide in 1994. It argues that Hannah Arendt's writings on reflective judgement, and the dual perspectives of actor and spectator she articulates, offer us a set of conceptual tools with which to examine the failure of the international community to respond to the genocide as well as more broadly to understand the moral dilemmas posed by such crimes against humanity. Having identified (...)
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  31.  46
    Impartiality and Evil: A Reconsideration Provoked by Genocide in Bosnia.Arne Johan Vetlesen - 1998 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (5):1-35.
    Confronted with Adolf Eichmann, evildoer par excellence, Hannah Arendt sought in vain for any 'depth' to the evil he had wrought. How is the philosopher to approach evil ? Is the celebrated criterion of impartiality ill-equipped to guide judgment when its object is evil - as exhibited, for instance, in the recent genocide in Bosnia? This essay questions the ability of the neutral 'third party' to respond adequately to evil from a standpoint of avowed impartiality. Discussing the different roles (...)
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  32.  12
    The Question of the Holocaust's Uniqueness: Was It Something More Than or Different From Genocide?Nigel Pleasants - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (3):297-310.
    Dating back to the very beginning of our knowledge of the events that constituted the Holocaust, some historians, social scientists, philosophers, theologians and public intellectuals argue that it was a unique historical, or even trans-historical, event. The aim of this article is to clarify what the uniqueness question should be about and to ascertain whether there are good reasons for judging that the Holocaust is unique. It examines the core meanings of ‘unique’ that feature in the literature and identifies which (...)
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  33. The Psychology of Genocide.Kristen Monroe - 1995 - Ethics & International Affairs 9.
    Review of Final Solutions: Biology, Prejudice, and Genocide, ; Genocide Watch, ; Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland, ; Survivors: An Oral History of the Armenian Genocide, ; The Path to Genocide: Essays on Launching the Final Solution, ; and Why Genocide? The Armenian and Jewish Experiences in Perspective,.
     
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  34.  32
    Collective Responsibility, Armed Intervention and the Rwandan Genocide.Seumas Miller - 1998 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (2):223-238.
    In this paper I explore the notion of collective moral responsibility as it pertains both to nation-states contemplating humanitarian armed intervention in international social conflicts, and as it pertains to social groups perpetrating human rights violations in such conflicts. I take the Rwandan genocide as illustrative of such conflicts and make use of it accordingly. I offer an individualist account of collective moral responsibility, according to which collective moral responsibility is a species of joint responsibility.
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  35.  49
    Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity: Dispelling the Conceptual Fog.Andrew Altman - 2012 - Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (1):280-308.
    Genocide and crimes against humanity are among the core crimes of international law, but they also carry great moral resonance due to their indissoluble link to the atrocities of the Nazi regime and to other egregious episodes of mass violence. However, the concepts of genocide and crimes against humanity are not well understood, even by the international lawyers and jurists who are most concerned with them. A conceptual fog hovers around the discussion of these two categories of crime. (...)
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  36.  20
    A Century of Genocide.Mario Baccianini - 1986 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1986 (70):154-161.
    The fact diat die first formal recognition of die crime of genocide (crimen lesae humanitatis) took place at Nuremberg in 1945 is extremely significant. Those who, to quote Adorno, record the extermination camps as “working incidents” in the victorious advance of civilization, or see “the martyrdom of die Jews as an irrelevant episode in the context of universal history,” fail to grasp die dominating trait of twentieth century atrocities: the perverse secularization of die religious motivations of genocide in (...)
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  37.  45
    Political Reconciliation, the Rule of Law, and Genocide.Colleen Murphy - 2007 - The European Legacy 12 (7):853-865.
    Political reconciliation involves the repairing of damaged political relationships. This paper considers the possibility and moral justifiability of pursuing political reconciliation in the aftermath of systematic and egregious wrongdoing, in particular genocide. The first two sections discuss what political reconciliation specifically requires. I argue that it neither entails nor necessitates forgiveness. Rather, I claim, political reconciliation should be conceptualized as the (re-)establishment of Fullerian mutual respect for the rule of law. When a society governs by law, publicly declared legal (...)
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  38.  10
    The Concept of Genocide Reconsidered.Mohammed Abed - 2015 - Social Theory and Practice 41 (2):328-356.
    Genocide is a violent process that aims at the liquidation of protected groups. Like individuals, groups can be killed in a variety of ways and for many different reasons. Only the intention of the perpetrator distinguishes genocide from other forms of mass violence. The implications of the account given are striking. Genocide is not in any sense distinctively heinous. Nor is it necessarily immoral. Under certain conditions, settlercolonialism, ethnic cleansing, and forced assimilation will count as instances of (...)
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  39.  20
    Feminist Perspectives on Global Warming, Genocide, and Card's Theory of Evil.Victoria Davion - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):160 - 177.
    This essay explores several moral issues raised by global warming through the lens of Claudia Card's theory of evil. I focus on Alaskan villages in the sub-Arctic whose residents must relocate owing to extreme erosion, melting sea ice, and rising water levels. I use Card's discussion of genocide as social death to argue that failure to help these groups maintain their unique cultural identities can be thought of as genocidal.
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  40.  30
    Giorgio Agamben's Lessons and Limitations in Confronting the Problem of Genocide.Hannes Gerhardt - 2011 - Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):5 - 17.
    In this paper, I work through the possible contours of an anti-genocide based on a framework informed by the work of Giorgio Agamben. Such a framework posits the inherent need to circumvent sovereign power within any form of normative activism. To begin, I show how the nascent anti-genocide movement promotes an ideal in which ?Western? states, particularly the USA, accept the global responsibility to protect persecuted life beyond national boundaries. Using Agamben, I argue that this vision also entails (...)
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  41. The Right to Life, Genocide and the Problem of Bystander State.D. H. Jones - 2005 - In John K. Roth (ed.), Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 265--276.
     
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  42.  5
    The United Nations and Genocide: Prevention, Intervention, and Prosecution. [REVIEW]Samuel Totten & Paul R. Bartrop - 2004 - Human Rights Review 5 (4):8-31.
    The UN has to date not been effective in preventing genocide, and has had only a slightly better record in stopping it. There have been occasions when its interventions has occurred only after a genocide has taken place, and even then its major focus has been on facilitating the provision of aid by non-governmental agencies rather than on the task of tracking down the perpetrators and bringing them to justice. The exceptions of the ICTY and the ICTR are (...)
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  43.  10
    Global Governance and Genocide in Rwanda.Anthony F. Lang Jr - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 16 (1):143–150.
    Lang writes: "Read together, [these books] make a fairly convincing case that the UN was indeed responsible for failing to stop the genocide in Rwanda.".
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  44.  2
    Génocide ou "guerre tribale"? Les mémoires controversées du génocide rwandais.Nicolas Bancel & Thomas Riot - 2008 - Hermes 52:, [ p.].
    Le génocide du Rwanda constitue l'un des événements majeurs du xxe siècle : 800 000 Tutsis et Hutus de l'opposition au « gouvernement intérimaire » rwandais ont été massacrés entre avril et juin 1994. Or, la reconnaissance de ce génocide ne va pas de soi. Cet article analyse les « contre-feux interprétatifs » mis en place selon trois axes : négation du génocide, euphémisation en « guerre tribale », thèse du « double génocide ». La presse dans cette guerre de (...)
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  45.  3
    The Report of The International Commission of Inquiry on Darfur: The Question of Genocide[REVIEW]Noëlle Quénivet - 2006 - Human Rights Review 7 (4):38-68.
    The crisis in Darfur (Sudan), which sparked in February 2003, only caught the United Nations’ attention in Spring 2004. Questions emerged as to whether the conflict between the rebels and the government was simply insurgency warfare or, in fact, concealed a genocide carried out by the Arab, Muslim-led government against the Animist and Christian-African population. The issue became so divisive that the Security Council requested the creation of an investigation team, the International Commission of Inquiry on Darfur, which amongst (...)
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  46.  3
    The Role of Individual States in Addressing Cases of Genocide.Kenneth J. Campbell - 2004 - Human Rights Review 5 (4):32-45.
    Overall, the leading Western states responded to genocide in the 1990s with too little, too late. Their political leaders chose a shortsighted strategy of denial, obfuscation, and deception rather than live, up to their solemn obligation to stop genocide. Humanity suffered greatly as a consequence. However, if genocide scholars can join and give direction to the ongoing debate within the national security community about how to prevent future Rwandas and Srebrenicas, then there is some hope that this (...)
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  47.  4
    Global Governance and Genocide in Rwanda.Anthony F. Lang - 2002 - Ethics International Affairs 16 (1):143-150.
    Lang writes: "Read together, [these books] make a fairly convincing case that the UN was indeed responsible for failing to stop the genocide in Rwanda.".
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  48.  6
    The United States and the Genocide Convention: Leading Advocate and Leading Obstacle.William Korey - 1997 - Ethics and International Affairs 11 (1):271–290.
    Korey provides a description of the long struggle for ratification of the Genocide Convention, detailing decades of work by a committee of fifty-two nongovernmental organizations lobbying the Senate and the American Bar Association, the treaty's key opponent.
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  49.  1
    Rape as Genocide: The Group/Individual Schism. [REVIEW]Daniela De Vito - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (3):361-378.
    This paper discusses, within the context of analytical theory, some of the implications when rape is subsumed within the international crime of genocide and concludes that this type of enquiry is essential for creating a clearer framework to address and understand this violation. From the analysis undertaken, two critical questions become apparent: a) Does compatibility exist when rape is subsumed within the category of a group violation (genocide), if rape is constructed as a violation of an individual’s sexual (...)
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  50.  1
    Innocent Denials of Known Genocides: A Further Contribution to a Psychology of Denial of Genocide[REVIEW]Israel W. Charny - 2000 - Human Rights Review 1 (3):15-39.
    The problem of revisionism, or efforts to deny and censor the incontrovertible history of known genocides, is a growing one. It is now clear that denial is inevitably a phase of the genocidal process, extending far beyond the immediate politically expedient denials of governments who are currently engaging in genocidal massacre or have just recently done so—i.e., the Chinese government's abject denials of the killings of some 5,000 in Tiananmen Square, or the Sri Lanka government's denials of the state-organized massacre (...)
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