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Geoffrey M. Hodgson [26]Geoffrey Martin Hodgson [2]
  1. Legal Institutionalism: Capitalism and the Constitutive Role of Law.Simon Deakin, David Gindis, Geoffrey M. Hodgson, Kainan Huang & Katharina Pistor - 2017 - Journal of Comparative Economics 45 (1):188-20.
    Social scientists have paid insufficient attention to the role of law in constituting the economic institutions of capitalism. Part of this neglect emanates from inadequate conceptions of the nature of law itself. Spontaneous conceptions of law and property rights that downplay the role of the state are criticized here, because they typically assume relatively small numbers of agents and underplay the complexity and uncertainty in developed capitalist systems. In developed capitalist economies, law is sustained through interaction between private agents, courts (...)
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  2.  57
    Meanings of Methodological Individualism.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2007 - Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (2):211-226.
    Advocacy of ?methodological individualism? is widespread, especially among economists. However, the term is rarely defined with adequate precision and some crucial ambiguities are explored in this article. Among these is the commonplace ambivalence over whether explanations should be in terms of individuals alone, or in terms of individuals plus relations between them. It is shown that a great deal hinges on this subtle and often overlooked distinction in explanantia. In particular, explanations in terms of individuals alone have never, as yet, (...)
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  3.  10
    Understanding and Defining Institutions: The Contribution of Francesco Gual. [REVIEW]Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2018 - Journal of Economic Methodology 25 (1):111-116.
  4.  24
    Underqualified—Maximal Generality in Darwinian Explanation: A Response to Matt Gers.Geoffrey M. Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (4):607-614.
    Gers (Biol Philos, 2011) provides a positive and constructive view of the project to generalise Darwinian principles in Geoffrey Hodgson and Thorbjørn Knudsen’s Darwin’s Conjecture. We note considerable overlap with his work and ours, and also with important recent work of Godfrey-Smith ( 2009 ), which Gers cites extensively. But we also note that there are differences in research objectives between Gers and Godfrey-Smith, on the one hand, and ourselves, on the other. Gers and Godfrey-Smith focus on the elucidation of (...)
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  5. Economics and Utopia. Why the Learning Economy is Not the End of History.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 1999 - Utopian Studies 10 (2):256-258.
  6.  75
    Darwinism, Causality and the Social Sciences.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2004 - Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (2):175-194.
    Recently the degree to which ?evolutionary economics? does or should involve Darwinian principles has come under debate. This essay builds on previous arguments that Darwinism has a potentially wide application to socioeconomic evolution, which does not involve biological reductionism. It is argued that at the core of Darwinism are presuppositions concerning causality and causal explanation. Contrary to widespread belief, these presuppositions do not downgrade or ignore human intentionality: they simply require that it too is in principle subject to causal explanation. (...)
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  7.  50
    Information, Complexity and Generative Replication.Geoffrey M. Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):47-65.
    The established definition of replication in terms of the conditions of causality, similarity and information transfer is very broad. We draw inspiration from the literature on self-reproducing automata to strengthen the notion of information transfer in replication processes. To the triple conditions of causality, similarity and information transfer, we add a fourth condition that defines a “generative replicator” as a conditional generative mechanism, which can turn input signals from an environment into developmental instructions. Generative replication must have the potential to (...)
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  8.  17
    Generalized Darwinism and Evolutionary Economics: From Ontology to Theory.Geoffrey M. Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):326-337.
    Despite growing interest in evolutionary economics since the 1980s, a unified theoretical approach has so far been lacking. Methodological and ontological discussions within evolutionary economics have attempted to understand and help rectify this failure, but have revealed in turn further differences of perspective. One aim of this article is to show how different approaches relate to different levels of abstraction. A second purpose is to show that generalized Darwinism is some way from the most abstract level, and illustrates how it (...)
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  9.  12
    Making Economics More Relevant: An Interview with Geoffrey Hodgson.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2010 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 3 (2):72-94.
  10. Institutional Economics: From Menger and Veblen to Coase and North.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2004 - In John Bryan Davis & Alain Marciano (eds.), The Elgar Companion to Economics and Philosophy. Edward Elgar. pp. 84--101.
  11.  22
    Cultural Evolution is More Than Neurological Evolution.Thorbjørn Knudsen & Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):356-357.
    Advancing a general Darwinian framework to explain culture is an exciting endeavor. It requires that we face up to the challenge of identifying the specific components that are effective in replication processes in culture. This challenge includes the unsolved problem of explaining cultural inheritance, both at the level of individuals and at the level of social organizations and institutions.
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  12.  16
    13 A Philosophical Perspective on Contemporary Evolutionary Economics.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2011 - In J. B. Davis & D. W. Hands (eds.), Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology. Edward Elgar Publishers. pp. 299.
  13.  29
    Hayek's Theory of Cultural Evolution: An Evaluation in the Light of Vanberg's Critique.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 1991 - Economics and Philosophy 7 (1):67-82.
    The application of evolutionary ideas to socioeconomic systems has been an increasingly prominent theme in the work of Friedrich Hayek, and the motif has become dominant in his recent book. In an earlier issue of this journal, Viktor Vanberg raises two substantive criticisms of Friedrich Hayek' theory of cultural evolution that invoke some important questions concerning use of the evolutionary analogy in social science.
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  14.  49
    On the Limits of Rational Choice Theory.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2012 - Economic Thought 1 (1).
    The value of rational choice theory for the social sciences has long been contested. It is argued here that, in the debate over its role, it is necessary to distinguish between claims that people maximise manifest payoffs, and claims that people maximise their utility. The former version has been falsified. The latter is unfalsifiable, because utility cannot be observed. In principle, utility maximisation can be adapted to fit any form of behaviour, including the behaviour of non-human organisms. Allegedly 'inconsistent' behaviour (...)
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  15.  28
    A Brief Response to Jürgen Lange-von Kulessa.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 1999 - Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (3):439-441.
  16.  44
    The Concept of Emergence in Social Sciences: Its History and Importance.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2000 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 2 (4):65-77.
  17.  9
    In Defence of Generalized Darwinism.Howard E. Aldrich, Geoffrey M. Hodgson, David L. Hull, Thorbjørn Knudsen, Joel Mokyr & Viktor J. Vanberg - 2008 - Journal of Evolutionary Economics 18:577-596.
    Darwin himself suggested the idea of generalizing the core Darwinian principles to cover the evolution of social entities. Also in the nineteenth century, influential social scientists proposed their extension to political society and economic institutions. Nevertheless, misunderstanding and misrepresentation have hindered the realization of the powerful potential in this longstanding idea. Some critics confuse generalization with analogy. Others mistakenly presume that generalizing Darwinism necessarily involves biological reductionism. This essay outlines the types of phenomena to which a generalized Darwinism applies, and (...)
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  18.  5
    Hayek's Theory of Cultural Evolution: An Evaluation in the Light of Vanberg's Critique: Geoffrey M. Hodgson.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 1991 - Economics and Philosophy 7 (1):67-82.
    The application of evolutionary ideas to socioeconomic systems has been an increasingly prominent theme in the work of Friedrich Hayek, and the motif has become dominant in his recent book. In an earlier issue of this journal, Viktor Vanberg raises two substantive criticisms of Friedrich Hayek' theory of cultural evolution that invoke some important questions concerning use of the evolutionary analogy in social science.
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  19.  43
    Microeconomics: Behavior, Institutions, and Evolution, Samuel Bowles, Princeton University Press and Russell Sage Foundation, 2004, 584 Pages. [REVIEW]Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):166-171.
  20.  23
    Some Claims Made for Critical Realism in Economics: Two Case Studies.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2004 - Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (1):53-73.
    Instead of examining critical realism directly, this essay critically examines claims made by two prominent critical realists, namely Andrew Collier and Tony Lawson, on behalf of their philosophy. These are (a) that critical realism supports Marx's law of the tendency of the rate of profit to fall, and (b) that critical realism is illustrated by the workplace organization theory of the relative decline of the British economy. It is argued that the first claim is false and the second is unsubstantiated. (...)
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  21.  17
    Darwin, Veblen and the Problem of Causality in Economics.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2001 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (3/4):385 - 423.
    This article discusses some of the ways in which Darwinism has influenced a small minority of economists. It is argued that Darwinism involves a philosophical as well as a theoretical doctrine. Despite claims to the contrary, the uses of analogies to Darwinian natural selection theory are highly limited in economics. Exceptions include Thorstein Veblen, Richard Nelson, and Sidney Winter. At the philosophical level, one of the key features of Darwinism is its notion of detailed understanding in terms of chains of (...)
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  22.  24
    Review Essay: Prospects for Economic Sociology.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2008 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (1):133-149.
    Swedberg's two-volume collection of essays covering New Developments in Economic Sociology contains some excellent material, worthy of study by both economists and sociologists. However, there are definitional and conceptual problems in the whole project of "economic sociology" exacerbated by the disappearance of any consensus concerning the boundaries between the disciplines of sociology and economics. Neither has "economic sociology" acquired an adequately clear identity through the use of distinctive concepts or theories. Its future prospects are further questioned by recent changes within (...)
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  23.  18
    Andrew Collier's Promised Land.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2003 - Journal of Critical Realism 2 (2):12-13.
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  24.  23
    Rationality Versus Program-Based Behavior.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):29-30.
    For Herbert Gintis, the “rational actor,” or “beliefs, preferences, and constraints (BPC),” model is central to his unifying framework for the behavioral sciences. It is not argued here that this model is refuted by evidence. Instead, this model relies ubiquitously on auxiliary assumptions, and is evacuated of much meaning when applied to both human and nonhuman organisms. An alternative perspective of “program-based behavior” is more consistent with evolutionary principles. (Published Online April 27 2007).
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  25.  9
    Marching to the Promised Land: Some Doubts on the Policy Affinities of Critical Realism.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2003 - Journal of Critical Realism 2 (2).
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  26.  11
    The State, Money, and “Spontaneous Order”.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 1994 - Critical Review 8 (4):579-589.
    In Monetary Evolution, Free Banking, and Economic Order, Stephen Horwitz has provided an excellent review of the profound problems in the neoclassical theory of money and an important statement of the alternative Austrian?school approach. However, Horwitz's ?free banking? perspective rests on a false dichotomy between intervention and spontaneous order. In using the extreme case of an entirely undesigned evolutionary process to counter the equally extreme proposition that social order can be wholly designed, Horwitz loses sight of the messy world of (...)
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