18 found
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George S. Howard [13]George Howard [5]George Elliott Howard [2]
  1.  68
    Statistical Power, the Belmont Report, and the Ethics of Clinical Trials.Sara H. Vollmer & George Howard - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):675-691.
    Achieving a good clinical trial design increases the likelihood that a trial will take place as planned, including that data will be obtained from a sufficient number of participants, and the total number of participants will be the minimal required to gain the knowledge sought. A good trial design also increases the likelihood that the knowledge sought by the experiment will be forthcoming. Achieving such a design is more than good sense—it is ethically required in experiments when participants are at (...)
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  2.  7
    The Effects of Sodium Amobarbital on Odor-Based Responding in Rats.George S. Howard & James H. Mchose - 1974 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 3 (3):185-186.
  3.  38
    No Middle Voice.George S. Howard - 1992 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):12-26.
    Discusses the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis, which maintains that nature be dissected along the lines laid down by native language. One characteristic of most modern languages is that subject–verb relationships can be expressed only in active and passive voices. Modern languages might force people into dichotomous thinking patterns, since human action is couched primarily in one voice or the other. Throughout history, several languages have possessed middle voices which allow for a more complex relationship between a subject and verb than can be (...)
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  4.  15
    Some Varieties of Free Will Worth Practicing.George S. Howard - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):50-61.
    Discusses freedom of will as being agentically independent of nonagentic coercion in actions and as choosing how to become faithfully interdependent. Recent experimental developments that demonstrated the causal force of the will in human actions reveal a picture of human action as partially self-determined and partially caused by nonagentic causal influences acting upon these agents. A 2nd manner of influence is when humans choose to become faithfully interdependent by becoming a believer in any number of foundational stories that give meaning (...)
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  5.  10
    Performance in Differential Instrumental Conditioning with Infrequent S+ Presentations.James H. McHose & George S. Howard - 1973 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 1 (2):132-134.
  6.  7
    And Binding Nature Fast in Fate, Left Free the Human Will.George S. Howard - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):73-78.
    Suggests that the papers by B. D. Slife , M. Gergen , R. N. Williams , and M. S. Richardson demonstrated no simple solution to the free will problem. How humans achieve some limited exercise of FW in a world of nonagentic, coercive forces remains unclear, especially as human nature and lives represent complex phenomena in which the person who exercises FW is anything but omnipotent, ahistorical, self-contained, and acultural. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  7.  11
    A Research Strategy For Studying Telic Human Behavior.George Howard, William Youngs & Ann Siatczynski - 1989 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 10 (4):393-412.
    Numerous writers have recently called for reform in psychological theorizing and research methodology designed to appreciate the teleological, active agent capacities of humans. This paper presents three studies that probe individual's abilities to volitionally control their eating behavior. These investigations suggest one way that researchers might consider the operation of telic powers in human action. Rather than seeing teleological explanations as rivals to the more traditional causal explanations favored in psychological research, this paper elaborates a position that sees human volition (...)
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  8.  44
    Aristotle, Teleology, and Modern Psychology.George S. Howard - 1990 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):31-38.
    After first discussing the symbiotic relationship between science and philosophy of science in mind, the author then presents a very selective glimpse of the path that science traversed from Aristotle and the ancients to the modern science of psychology. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  9. Book Review: Messiah in Context. [REVIEW]George Howard - 1986 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 40 (2):203-204.
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  10. Book Review: The Genius of Paul: A Study in History. [REVIEW]George Howard - 1980 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 34 (3):318-320.
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  11.  5
    Hellenic Civilization.George Elliott Howard - 1916 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (20):548-555.
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  12.  1
    Hellenic Civilization.George Elliott Howard - 1916 - Journal of Philosophy 13 (20):548.
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  13. Pluralism: An Antidote for Fanaticism, the Delusion of Our Age.George S. Howard & Cody D. Christopherson - 2009 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 30 (3):139-147.
    William James’s pluralism, when combined with his pragmatism and radical empiricism, is a complete and coherent philosophy of life. James provides an antidote to the excesses of both the extreme realist/objectivist and the extreme constructivist/relativist camps. In this paper, we demonstrate how this is so in a discussion of epistemology and ontology including several extended examples. These examples demonstrate the inescapability of context and background assumptions and the advantages of a pluralist worldview.
     
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  14. Paul: Crisis in Galatia. A Study in Early Christian Theology.George Howard - 1979
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  15.  8
    Steps Toward a Science of Free Will.George S. Howard - 1993 - Counseling and Values 37:116-28.
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  16.  37
    When Psychology Looks Like a "Soft" Science, It's for Good Reasonp.George S. Howard - 1993 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):42-47.
    The natural sciences are sometimes called "hard" sciences in contrast to the social sciences , which are thought to represent "soft" sciences. L. V. Hedges made an important effort to determine the empirical cumulativeness of various scientific research programs, with an eye toward assessing if this criterion is related to a discipline's "hardness" or "softness." This article discusses another criterion, a research program's predictive accuracy, that might also be considered along with a program's empirical cumulativeness. Finally, recent improvements in the (...)
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  17.  10
    13 Whose Will? How Free?George S. Howard - 2008 - In John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.), Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oxford University Press. pp. 260.
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  18. Division 24 Convention Program 1994.Jeffrey P. Lindstrom, Stephen C. Yanchar, Beyond Complementarity, Lisa M. Osbeck, Brent D. Slife, Adelbert H. Jenkins, Free Will & George S. Howard - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology: Journal of Division 24 14 (1):107.
     
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