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Georges Dicker
State University of New York (SUNY)
  1. Berkeley's idealism: a critical examination.Georges Dicker - 2011 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's Idealism both advances Berkeley scholarship and serves as a useful guide for teachers and students.
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  2.  52
    Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Analytical Introduction.Georges Dicker - 2004 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    Kant's masterpiece, Critique of Pure Reason, is universally recognized to be among the most difficult of all philosophical writing, and yet it is required reading in almost every course that covers modern philosophy. Most students find Critique of Pure Reason impenetrable without the help of secondary sources. While there are numerous advanced scholarly works on the topic, Dicker's is the first treatment explicitly designed for undergraduates to read alongside the primary text, rendering Kant's views accessible without oversimplifying them. His book (...)
  3.  87
    Descartes: an analytical and historical introduction.Georges Dicker - 1993 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    A solid grasp of the main themes and arguments of the seventeenth century philosopher Rene Descartes is an essential tool towards understanding modern thought, and a necessary entree to the work of the empiricists and Immanuel Kant, and to the study of contemporary epistemology and philosophy of mind. Clear and accessible, this book serves as an introduction to Descartes's ideas for undergraduates and as a sophisticated companion to his Meditations for more advanced readers. After a thorough discussion of the main (...)
  4. Kant's refutation of idealism.Georges Dicker - 2008 - Noûs 42 (1):80–108.
  5. Descartes and the Meditations.Georges Dicker - 2005 - Philosophical Review 114 (1):122-125.
  6.  55
    Hume's Epistemology and Metaphysics: An Introduction.Georges Dicker - 1998 - New York: Routledge.
    David Hume's _Treatise on Human Nature_ and _Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding_ are amongst the most widely-studies texts on philosophy. _Hume's Epistemology and Metaphysics: An Introduction_ presents in a clear, concise and accessible manner the key themes of these texts. Georges Dicker clarifies Hume's views on meaning, knowledge, causality, and sense perception step by step and provides us with a sharp picture of how philosophical thinking has been influenced by Hume. Accessible to anyone coming to Hume for the first time, _Hume's (...)
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  7.  62
    Perceptual Knowledge.Georges Dicker - 1980 - Dordrecht: Reidel.
    INTRODUCTION This book is a systematic study of the problem of perception and knowledge. I intend to analyze the problem, to expound and criticize the most ...
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  8. Hume's Epistemology and Metaphysics: An Introduction.Georges Dicker - 1998 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 61 (2):406-407.
  9.  16
    An Idea Can Be like Nothing but an Idea.Georges Dicker - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):39 - 52.
  10.  8
    Metaphysical and Epistemological Problems of Perception.Georges Dicker - 1988 - Noûs 22 (3):483-485.
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  11. Perceptual Knowledge.Georges Dicker - 1983 - Mind 92 (366):279-281.
     
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  12. Kant's refutation of idealism: A reply to Chignell.Georges Dicker - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):175-183.
    I reply to the most important criticisms made by Chignell of my ‘Kant's Refutation of Idealism’. I also introduce a new consideration which brings out more fully the power of Kant's argument.
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  13. Leibniz on Necessary and Contingent Propositions.Georges Dicker - 1982 - Studia Leibnitiana 14:221.
    Dans son Discours de Métaphysique‚ Leibniz maintient que le concept individuel d'une substance comprend et permet la déduction de tous ses prédicats, et certains prédicats d'une substance lui appartiennent néanmoins d'une manière contingente. Arnauld objecta contre Leibniz que implique la fausseté de — ce qui démontre, selon Arnauld, l'absurdité de . En puisant les réponses de Leibniz à Arnauld dans leur Correspondence, l'auteur soutient que la position de Leibniz, pourvu qu'elle soit interprétée à la lumière des principes générales de sa (...)
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  14.  94
    Primary and Secondary Qualities: A Proposed Modification of the Lockean Account.Georges Dicker - 1977 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (4):457-471.
  15.  82
    A Refutation of Rowe’s Critique of Anselm’s Ontological Argument.Georges Dicker - 1988 - Faith and Philosophy 5 (2):193-202.
    In William L. Rowe’s “The Ontological Argument,” an essay that appears in the most recent editions of Feinberg’s Reason and Responsibility and as a chapter in Rowe’s Philosophy of Religion, Rowe reconstructs Anselm’s Proslogium II argument for the existence of God, surveys critically several standard objections to it, and presents an original critique. Although Rowe’s reconstruction is perspicuous and his criticisms of the standard objections are judicious, his own critique, I argue, leaves Anselm’s argument unscathed. I conclude with some programmatic (...)
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  16.  75
    Berkeley on the Impossibility of Abstracting Primary from Secondary Qualities: Lockean Rejoinders.Georges Dicker - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):23-45.
  17.  4
    Transcendental Arguments and Temporal Experience1.Georges Dicker - 2013 - In Heather Dyke & Adrian Bardon (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Time. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 410–431.
    In this chapter, the author shows how certain deep points about temporal experience drive both versions of Kant's transcendental deduction of the categories – a transcendental argument that he called a “Deduction” not because of its deductive structure but because in German the term “Deduktion” had a legal meaning signifying establishment of the right or title to something, in this case the right to apply Kant's categorical concepts – and their sequel in the Analogies of Experience. The author also discusses (...)
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  18.  37
    “Cogito, Ergo Sum”: Proof or Petitio?Georges Dicker - 2022 - The European Legacy 27 (3-4):269-282.
    ABSTRACT E. M. Curley has said that Descartes’ cogito, ergo sum “is as obscure on examination as it is compelling at first glance.” Why should that be? Maybe because the cogito raises so many textual and interpretive questions. Is it an argument or an intuition? If it is an argument, does it require an additional premise? Is it best interpreted as a “performance?” Is it best seen as the discovery that any reason proposed for doubting its success entails the meditator’s (...)
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  19.  4
    European and American Philosophers.John Marenbon, Douglas Kellner, Richard D. Parry, Gregory Schufreider, Ralph McInerny, Andrea Nye, R. M. Dancy, Vernon J. Bourke, A. A. Long, James F. Harris, Thomas Oberdan, Paul S. MacDonald, Véronique M. Fóti, F. Rosen, James Dye, Pete A. Y. Gunter, Lisa J. Downing, W. J. Mander, Peter Simons, Maurice Friedman, Robert C. Solomon, Nigel Love, Mary Pickering, Andrew Reck, Simon J. Evnine, Iakovos Vasiliou, John C. Coker, Georges Dicker, James Gouinlock, Paul J. Welty, Gianluigi Oliveri, Jack Zupko, Tom Rockmore, Wayne M. Martin, Ladelle McWhorter, Hans-Johann Glock, Georgia Warnke, John Haldane, Joseph S. Ullian, Steven Rieber, David Ingram, Nick Fotion, George Rainbolt, Thomas Sheehan, Gerald J. Massey, Barbara D. Massey, David E. Cooper, David Gauthier, James M. Humber, J. N. Mohanty, Michael H. Dearmey, Oswald O. Schrag, Ralf Meerbote, George J. Stack, John P. Burgess, Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Nicholas Jolley, Adriaan T. Peperzak, E. J. Lowe, William D. Richardson, Stephen Mulhall & C. - 2017 - In Robert L. Arrington (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophers. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 109–557.
    Peter Abelard (1079–1142 ce) was the most wide‐ranging philosopher of the twelfth century. He quickly established himself as a leading teacher of logic in and near Paris shortly after 1100. After his affair with Heloise, and his subsequent castration, Abelard became a monk, but he returned to teaching in the Paris schools until 1140, when his work was condemned by a Church Council at Sens. His logical writings were based around discussion of the “Old Logic”: Porphyry's Isagoge, aristotle'S Categories and (...)
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  20.  83
    Kant's Refutation of Idealism: Once More Unto the Breach.Georges Dicker - 2012 - Kantian Review 17 (2):191-195.
    In ‘Kant's Refutation of Idealism’ (Noûs, 47), I defend a version of the Refutation, pioneered by Paul Guyer inKant and the Claims of Knowledge, whose core idea is that the only way that one can know the order of one's own past experiences, except in certain rare cases, is by correlating them with the successive states of perceived external objects that caused the experiences. Andrew Chignell has offered a probing critique of my reconstruction of Kant's argument (Philosophical Quarterly, 60), and (...)
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  21.  88
    Two Arguments From Perceptual Relativity in Berkeley's Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous.Georges Dicker - 1982 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):409-422.
    I argue that philonous gives two versions of the argument from perceptual relativity--One for the secondary qualities and another for the primary. Further, Both versions ultimately turn on the epistemological assumption that every case of perceiving, Regardless of the conditions of observation, Is a case of "knowing" the character of some "object". This assumption is made in order to avoid a vicious regress that arises when one tries to understand how perceptual knowledge is possible.
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  22.  10
    Hume and Induction: Merely Cognitive Psychology?Georges Dicker - 2023 - Hume Studies 48 (1):79-116.
    Abstract:The purpose of Hume’s argument about induction, contra “literalist” interpretations that see it merely as psychology, is to show that induction cannot be justified. Hume maintains that the only way to justify induction would be to demonstrate or to produce a good inductive argument for the uniformity principle (UP). His most famous point is that any attempt to justify UP inductively would be circular. One may retort that no inductive argument can be circular, for a circular argument must be deductively (...)
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  23.  45
    Hume Studies Referees, 2006–2007.Margaret Atherton, Tom Beauchamp, Deborah Boyle, Emily Carson, Dorothy Coleman, Angela Coventry, Shelagh Crooks, Remy Debes, Georges Dicker & Paul Draper - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (2):385-387.
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  24.  90
    Anti-Berkeley.Georges Dicker - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):335 – 350.
  25.  24
    A Refutation of Rowe’s Critique of Anselm’s Ontological Argument.Georges Dicker - 1988 - Faith and Philosophy 5 (2):193-202.
    In William L. Rowe’s “The Ontological Argument,” an essay that appears in the most recent editions of Feinberg’s Reason and Responsibility and as a chapter in Rowe’s Philosophy of Religion, Rowe reconstructs Anselm’s Proslogium II argument for the existence of God, surveys critically several standard objections to it, and presents an original critique. Although Rowe’s reconstruction is perspicuous and his criticisms of the standard objections are judicious, his own critique, I argue, leaves Anselm’s argument unscathed. I conclude with some programmatic (...)
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  26.  77
    Berkeley on immediate perception: Once more unto the breach.Georges Dicker - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (225):517–535.
    I have previously argued that within an argument to show that we cannot perceive the causes of our sensations, Berkeley's Philonous conflates a psychological and an epistemic sense of 'immediately perceive', and uses the principle of perceptual immediacy (PPI), that whatever is perceived by the senses is immediately perceived. George Pappas has objected that Berkeley does not operate with either of these concepts of immediate perception, and does not subscribe to (PPI). But I show that Berkeley's argumentative strategy requires him (...)
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  27.  39
    Berkeley on the Impossibility of Abstracting Primary from Secondary Qualities: Lockean Rejoinders.Georges Dicker - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):23-45.
  28.  5
    Dewey's theory of knowing.Georges Dicker - 1976 - Philadelphia: University City Science Center.
  29. Dewey's Theory of Knowing.Georges Dicker - 1978 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 14 (1):77-79.
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  30.  17
    "Epistemology" Reburied.Georges Dicker - 1995 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 31 (1):167 - 184.
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  31.  47
    Hume's Fork Revisited.Georges Dicker - 1991 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 8 (4):327 - 342.
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  32.  29
    Is there a problem about perception and knowledge?Georges Dicker - 1978 - American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (3):165-176.
  33.  22
    John Dewey: Instrumentalism in Social Action.Georges Dicker - 1971 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 7 (4):221 - 232.
  34.  16
    John Dewey on the Object of Knowledge.Georges Dicker - 1972 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 8 (3):152 - 166.
  35. Knowing and 'Coming-to-Know' in Dewey's Theory of Knowledge.Georges Dicker - 1969 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
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  36.  74
    Knowing and Coming-to-Know in John Dewey’s Theory of Knowledge.Georges Dicker - 1973 - The Monist 57 (2):191-219.
    Anyone familiar with some of Dewey’s major works knows that they are highly critical of nearly all that has traditionally passed under the name of “epistemology” or “theory of knowledge”. Even a casual reading of a few chapters of Reconstruction in Philosophy, The Quest for Certainty or Experience and Nature reveals Dewey’s iconoclasm toward “that species of confirmed intellectual lock-jaw called epistemology”. The source of this attitude is Dewey’s belief that all theories of knowledge previous to his own are based (...)
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  37.  46
    Review: Forster, Kant and Skepticism.Georges Dicker - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):609-615.
  38.  51
    Kant’s Transcendental Proof of Realism.Georges Dicker - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):740–745.
  39.  16
    Locke on Knowledge and Reality: A Commentary on an Essay Concerning Human Understanding.Georges Dicker - 2019 - New York: Oup Usa.
    Georges Dicker here provides a commentary on John Locke's masterwork, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding-the foundational work of classical Empiricism. Dicker's commentary is an accessible guide for students who are reading Locke for the first time; a useful research tool for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students; and a contribution to Locke scholarship for professional scholars. It is designed to be read alongside the Essay, but does not presuppose familiarity with it.
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  40. Moltke S. Gram, Direct Realism: A Study of Perception Reviewed by.Georges Dicker - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5 (5):196-198.
  41.  58
    Regularity, Conditionality, and Asymmetry in Causation.Georges Dicker - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:129-138.
    In this paper I explore the relationship between the “Humean” regularity view of causation, the view that a cause is a necessary condition of its effect, and the asymmetry of causation—the principle that if an event e1 causes e2, then it is false that e2 causes e1. I argue that the regularity view, in combination with the view that a cause is a necessary condition of its effect, is inconsistent with the asymmetry of causation, and that the inconsistency can be (...)
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  42. Seeing Bodies Move.Georges Dicker - 1973 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2):111.
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  43. The Annual Proceedings of the Center for Philosophic Exchange, SUNY Brockport.Georges Dicker (ed.) - forthcoming
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  44. The Concept of Immediate Perception and Berkeley's Immaterialism.Georges Dicker - 1982 - In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  45.  37
    The Moderns in an Introductory Analytic Course.Georges Dicker - 1990 - Teaching Philosophy 13 (3):265-272.
  46.  35
    The problem of perception, by A. D. Smith.Georges Dicker - 2006 - European Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):423–430.
  47.  58
    Three Questions about Treatise 1.4.2.Georges Dicker - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):115-153.
    Why does Hume think that the "distinct existence" of sensible objects implies their "continu'd existence"? Does Hume have any reason for thinking that objects have an intermittent existence, other than that they lack a "distinct" existence? Why does Hume think that the inference from the "coherence" of our impressions to the continued existence of objects is "at bottom" considerably different from causal reasoning? The answers proposed are, respectively, that perceptually delimited objects would for Hume be causally dependent on being perceived; (...)
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  48.  29
    Warranted Assertibility and the Uniformity of Nature.Georges Dicker - 1973 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 9 (2):110 - 115.
    Dewey defines knowledge as the outcome of competent inquiry. but knowledge is for dewey fundamentally predictive. this gives rise to a difficulty: should the course of nature change, a man might both know something (having carried out the relevant inquiry) and not know it (his relevant predictions being false). this difficulty is set out formally, and a solution is proposed in terms of dewey's concept of warranted assertibility.
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  49.  17
    Dinesh C. Mathur, 1919-2006.Vandana Mathur & Georges Dicker - 2007 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 81 (2):174 -.
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  50.  28
    Berkeley’s Argument for Idealism, by Samuel C. Rickless.: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Georges Dicker - 2013 - Mind 122 (488):1183-1187.
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