30 found
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Georgina Stewart [26]Georgina Tuari Stewart [5]
  1.  99
    Towards a Philosophy of Academic Publishing.Michael A. Peters, Petar Jandrić, Ruth Irwin, Kirsten Locke, Nesta Devine, Richard Heraud, Andrew Gibbons, Tina Besley, Jayne White, Daniella Forster, Liz Jackson, Elizabeth Grierson, Carl Mika, Georgina Stewart, Marek Tesar, Susanne Brighouse, Sonja Arndt, George Lazaroiu, Ramona Mihaila, Catherine Legg & Leon Benade - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (14):1401-1425.
    This article is concerned with developing a philosophical approach to a number of significant changes to academic publishing, and specifically the global journal knowledge system wrought by a range of new digital technologies that herald the third age of the journal as an electronic, interactive and mixed-media form of scientific communication. The paper emerges from an Editors' Collective, a small New Zealand-based organisation comprised of editors and reviewers of academic journals mostly in the fields of education and philosophy. The paper (...)
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  2.  23
    From Both Sides of the Indigenous-Settler Hyphen in Aotearoa New Zealand.Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):767-775.
    Iho/abstractThe idea of the ‘intercultural hyphen’ is likened to a gap or bridge between ethnic groups, created from the ongoing intertwining of sociopolitical and intellectual histories. This ‘gap or bridge’ wording captures the paradoxical nature of the intercultural space, for which the ‘hyphen’ is a shorthand symbol or sign. There are options on either side to engage or disengage across the intercultural space represented by the hyphen—but how, and with what results? In Aotearoa New Zealand, tensions invoked by the indigenous-settler (...)
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  3.  23
    Māori in the Kingdom of the Gaze: Subjects or Critics?Carl Mika & Georgina Stewart - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (3).
    For Māori, a real opportunity exists to flesh out some terms and concepts that Western thinkers have adopted and that precede disciplines but necessarily inform them. In this article, we are intent on describing one of these precursory phenomena—Foucault’s Gaze—within a framework that accords with a Māori philosophical framework. Our discussion is focused on the potential and limits of colonised thinking, which has huge implications for such disciplines as education, among others. We have placed Foucault’s Gaze alongside a Māori metaphysics (...)
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  4.  15
    Introducing the Indigenous Philosophy Group.Georgina Stewart, Carl Mika, Garrick Cooper, Vaughan Bidois & Te Kawehau Hoskins - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (9):851-855.
  5.  8
    Reviewing and Ethics in the Online Academy.Georgina Stewart - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (5):437-442.
    This commentary paper reflects on what I have recently learned from being involved in the Editorial Development Group established by the journal EPAT and its owners, the learned society of PESA. Besides disseminating the experience of this group, the paper suggests there is a link between the ideas of ‘netiquette’, the online academy, and the ethics of reviewing.
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  6.  8
    Lifting the Publishing Curtain: The Editor Interview Project of the EPAT Editorial Development Group.Liz Jackson & Georgina Stewart - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (2).
  7.  16
    Mäori in the Science Curriculum: Developments and Possibilities.Georgina Stewart - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):851–870.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the current state of development of Mäori science curriculum policy, and the roles that various discourses have played in shaping these developments. These discussions provide a background for suggestions about a possible future direction, and the presentation of a new concept for Mäori science education.
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  8.  18
    What Can Indigenous Feminist Knowledge and Practices Bring to “Indigenizing” the Academy?Kim Anderson, Elena Flores Ruíz, Georgina Tuari Stewart & Madina Tlostanova - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (1):121-155.
    More than a decade has passed since North American Indigenous scholars began a public dialogue on how we might “Indigenize the academy.” Discussions around how to “Indigenize” and whether it’s possible to “decolonize” the academy in Canada have proliferated as a result of the Truth and Reconciliation of Canada, which calls upon Canadians to learn the truth about colonial relations and reconcile the damage that is ongoing. Indigenous scholars are increasingly leading and writing about efforts in their institutions; efforts include (...)
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  9.  8
    Women, Philosophy, and Education.Nesta Devine & Georgina Stewart - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (7):681-683.
  10.  5
    Infantologies II: Songs of the Cradle.Andrew Gibbons, Michael A. Peters, Georgina Tuari Stewart, Marek Tesar, Neil Boland, Viktor Johansson, Nicky de Lautour, Nesta Devine, Nina Hood & Sean Sturm - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-16.
  11.  7
    Situating Decolonization: An Indigenous Dilemma.Brian Martin, Georgina Stewart, Bruce Ka’imi Watson, Ola Keola Silva, Jeanne Teisina, Jacoba Matapo & Carl Mika - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (3):312-321.
    Being Indigenous and operating in an institution such as a university places us in a complex position. The premise of decolonizing history, literature, curriculum, and thought in general creates a tenuous space for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples to confront a shared colonial condition. What does decolonization mean for Indigenous peoples? Is decolonization an implied promise to squash the tropes of coloniality? Or is it a way for non-Indigenous people to create another paradigm or site for their own resistance or transgression (...)
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  12.  12
    What is Indigenous Research in Philosophy of Education? And What is PESA, From an Indigenous Perspective?Carl Mika, Georgina Stewart, Ka’imi Watson, Keola Silva, Brian Martin, Jacoba Matapo & Akata Galuvao - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):733-739.
  13.  22
    What is Philosophy for Indigenous People, in Relation to Education?Carl Mika & Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):744-746.
  14.  8
    Actual Minds of Two Halves: Measurement, Metaphor and the Message.Georgina Stewart - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (11):1227-1233.
    This article takes ‘measurement’ as a will to determine or fix space and time, which allows for a comparison of ontological models of space and time from Western and Māori traditions. The spirit of ‘measurement’ is concomitantly one of fixing meaning, which is suggested as the essence of the growth of the scientific genre of language that has taken place alongside the growth of science itself, since the European Enlightenment. ‘Measurement’ and ‘metaphor’ are posited as an original binary for classifying (...)
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  15.  7
    Academic Publishing, Philosophy of Education and the Future.Georgina Stewart & Daniella J. Forster - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (2).
  16.  2
    Academic-Māori-Woman: The Impossible May Take a Little Longer.Georgina Tuari Stewart - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-6.
  17.  1
    Georgina Tuari Stewart on Decolonizing and Indigenizing Education in Canada.Georgina Tuari Stewart - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-3.
  18.  15
    Kaupapa Māori, Philosophy and Schools.Georgina Stewart - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-6.
    Goals for adding philosophy to the school curriculum centre on the perceived need to improve the general quality of critical thinking found in society. School philosophy also provides a means for asking questions of value and purpose about curriculum content across and between subjects, and, furthermore, it affirms the capability of children to think philosophically. Two main routes suggested are the introduction of philosophy as a subject, and processes of facilitating philosophical discussions as a way of establishing classroom ‘communities of (...)
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  19.  5
    Mana Wahine and Washday at the Pā.Georgina Stewart - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-9.
    Washday at the Pā is the title of an old schoolbook, a picture reading book for younger schoolchildren, which was produced in 1964 by the state education system in Aotearoa-New Zealand in 1964, written and photographed by Ans Westra, who later became one of the most famous photographers in the country. Washday at the Pā provoked a national debate when the Minister of Education acceded to protests by the Māori Womens Welfare League against its use in classrooms by withdrawing it (...)
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  20.  7
    Mana Wahine and Washday at the Pā.Georgina Stewart - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (7):684-692.
    Washday at the Pā is the title of an old schoolbook, a picture reading book for younger schoolchildren, which was produced in 1964 by the state education system in Aotearoa-New Zealand in 1964, written and photographed by Ans Westra, who later became one of the most famous photographers in the country. Washday at the Pā provoked a national debate when the Minister of Education acceded to protests by the Māori Womens Welfare League against its use in classrooms by withdrawing it (...)
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  21.  7
    Response to Aborigine, Indian, Indigenous or First Nations? By Michael Peters and Carl Mika.Georgina Stewart - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (13):1288-1289.
  22.  4
    Re-Calling the Humanities: Language, Education and Humans Being.Georgina Stewart - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-3.
  23.  2
    Re-Calling the Humanities: Language, Education and Humans Being. [REVIEW]Georgina Stewart - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (3):316-319.
  24.  76
    Science in the Māori‐Medium Curriculum: Assessment of Policy Outcomes in Pūtaiao Education.Georgina Stewart - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):724-741.
    This second research paper on science education in Māori‐medium school contexts complements an earlier article published in this journal. Science and science education are related domains in society and in state schooling in which there have always been particularly large discrepancies in participation and achievement by Māori. In 1995 a Kaupapa Māori analysis of this situation challenged New Zealand science education academics to deal with ‘the Māori crisis’ within science education. Recent NCEA results suggest Pūtaiao education, for which a national (...)
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  25.  7
    Thinking About Learning in Apocalyptic Times.Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (14):1563-1564.
  26.  24
    The Extra Strand of the Māori Science Curriculum.Georgina Stewart - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1175-1182.
    This paper comments on the process of re-development of the Maori-medium Science (Pūtaiao) curriculum, as part of overall curriculum development in Aotearoa New Zealand. A significant difference from the English Science curriculum was the addition of an ‘extra strand’ covering the history and philosophy of science. It is recommended that this strand be taught by means of narratives (i.e. using ‘narrative pedagogy’) in order to avoid a superficial didacticism that succumbs to the traditional notion of science curriculum content as ‘merely (...)
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  27.  16
    The ‘Hau’ of Research: Mauss Meets Kaupapa Māori.Georgina Stewart - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (1):1-11.
    ‘The Gift’ is the English title of a small book first published in French in 1925 by sociologist Marcel Mauss, which catalyzed an ongoing debate linked to a wide range of scholarship. Mauss’s gift theory included the Māori example of the ‘hau of the gift’ which Mauss explained as a spiritual force, seeking to return to its original owner or place of origin. This article brings a critical Māori perspective to Mauss’ notion of the hau of the gift, in an (...)
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  28.  9
    The Long Arc of Knowledge: An Interview with Nicholas Burbules.Georgina Stewart - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (2).
  29.  11
    “Under Erasure”: Suppressed and Trans-Ethnic Māori Identities.Georgina Tuari Stewart & Makere Stewart-Harawira - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (2):1-12.
    The questions raised by Māori identity are not static, but complex and changing over time. The ethnicity known as “Māori” came into existence in colonial New Zealand as a new, pan-tribal identity concept, in response to the trauma of invasion and dispossession by large numbers of mainly British settlers. Ideas of Māori identity have changed over the course of succeeding generations in response to wider social and economic changes. While inter-ethnic marriages and other sexual liaisons have been common throughout the (...)
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  30.  13
    What Does ‘Indigenous’ Mean, for Me?Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):740-743.