8 found
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  1.  19
    Ethics and HTA: Some Lessons and Challenges for the Future.Rob Reuzel, Wija Oortwijn, Michael Decker, Christian Clausen, Pedro Gallo, John Grin, Armin Grunwald, Leo Hennen, Gert Jan van der Wilt & Yutaka Yoshinaka - 2004 - Poiesis and Praxis 2 (2-3):247-256.
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  2.  15
    Ethical analysis in HTA of complex health interventions.Kristin Bakke Lysdahl, Wija Oortwijn, Gert Jan van der Wilt, Pietro Refolo, Dario Sacchini, Kati Mozygemba, Ansgar Gerhardus, Louise Brereton & Bjørn Hofmann - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1.
    In the field of health technology assessment, there are several approaches that can be used for ethical analysis. However, there is a scarcity of literature that critically evaluates and compares the strength and weaknesses of these approaches when they are applied in practice. In this paper, we analyse the applicability of some selected approaches for addressing ethical issues in HTA in the field of complex health interventions. Complex health interventions have been the focus of methodological attention in HTA. However, the (...)
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  3.  59
    The Ethics of Assessing Health Technologies.Gert Jan van der Wilt, Rob Reuzel & H. David Banta - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (1):101-113.
    Health technology assessment consists of thesystematic study of the consequences of theintroduction or continued use of the technology in aparticular context, with the explicit objective toarrive at a judgment of the value or merit of thetechnology. Ideally, it is aimed at assessing allaspects of a given technology or group oftechnologies, including non-technical, e.g.socio-ethical, aspects. However, methods for assessingsocio-ethical implications of health technology arerelatively undeveloped and few mechanisms exist totake action based on the results of such evaluations.Still, the examples of cochlear (...)
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  4.  47
    A View From the Netherlands: Ethics as Interactive Evaluation.Rob Reuzel, Gert Jan Van der Wilt, Pieter de Vries Robbé & Henk ten Have - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):110-114.
    From 1991 to 1994 the Dutch Health Insurance Council financed research on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO). This is a technique for providing cardiopulmonary bypass to patients with pulmonary and/or cardiac failure. Most often, these patients are premature neonates. During ECMO, blood is drained from the right atrium, pumped along a membrane where gas exchange takes place, and then redirected to the aorta. To prevent blood clotting, heparin is added. However, with the heparin added, the risk of hemorrhage is considerably increased. (...)
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  5.  10
    Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Health Care Services, and Concepts of Distributive Justice.Gert Jan van der Wilt - 1994 - Health Care Analysis 2 (4):296-305.
    Two answers to the question ‘how can we allocate health care resources fairly?’ are introduced and discussed. Both utilitarian and egalitarian approaches are found relevant, but both exhibit considerable theoretical and practical difficulties. Neither seems capable of solving the problem on its own. It is suggested that, for practical purposes, a version of Rawls' famous thought experiment might provide at least some enlightenment about which theoretical approach should be used to address the question.
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  6.  21
    Health Care and the Principle of Fair Equality of Opportunity.Gert Jan van der Wilt - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (4):329–349.
    ABSTRACTIn The Netherlands, the public funding of a number of health care services is controversial. What can we learn from this about the moral concerns that underlie these judgements? And, if there is anything to learn, can we use this improved understanding to scrutinise the adequacy of particular decisions concerning the public funding of health care services? In the present paper, I will analyse three cases: corrective surgey, In Vitro Fertilisation and liver transplantation. I will summarise the arguments that have (...)
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  7.  5
    Participatory Workshops Are Not Enough to Prevent Policy Implementation Failures: An Example of a Policy Development Process Concerning the Drug Interferon-Beta for Multiple Sclerosis. [REVIEW]Margriet Moret-Hartman, Rob Reuzel, John Grin & Gert Jan van der Wilt - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (2):161-175.
    A possible explanation for policy implementation failure is that the views of the policy’s target groups are insufficiently taken into account during policy development. It has been argued that involving these groups in an interactive process of policy development could improve this. We analysed a project in which several target populations participated in workshops aimed to optimise the utilisation of an expensive novel drug (interferon beta) for patients with Multiple Sclerosis. All participants seemed to agree on the appropriateness of establishing (...)
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  8.  6
    A View From the Netherlands: Ethics as Interactive Evaluation.Rob Reuzel, Gert Jan van Der Wilt, Pieter Vries Robbdeé & Henk ten Have - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):110-114.
    From 1991 to 1994 the Dutch Health Insurance Council financed research on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation . This is a technique for providing cardiopulmonary bypass to patients with pulmonary and/or cardiac failure. Most often, these patients are premature neonates. During ECMO, blood is drained from the right atrium, pumped along a membrane where gas exchange takes place, and then redirected to the aorta. To prevent blood clotting, heparin is added. However, with the heparin added, the risk of hemorrhage is considerably increased. (...)
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