9 found
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  1.  11
    ViSA: A Neurodynamic Model for Visuo-Spatial Working Memory, Attentional Blink, and Conscious Access.Luca Simione, Antonino Raffone, Gezinus Wolters, Paola Salmas, Chie Nakatani, Marta Olivetti Belardinelli & Cees van Leeuwen - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (4):745-769.
  2. Binding in Working Memory and Long-Term Memory: Towards an Integrated Model.Jaap Mj Murre, Gezinus Wolters & Antonino Raffone - 2006 - In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
     
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  3.  27
    NMDA Synapses Can Bias Competition Between Object Representations and Mediate Attentional Selection.Antonino Raffone, Jaap M. J. Murre & Gezinus Wolters - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):100-101.
    Phillips & Silverstein emphasize the gain-control properties of NMDA synapses in cognitive coordination. We endorse their view and suggest that NMDA synapses play a crucial role in biased attentional competition and (visual) working memory. Our simulations show that NMDA synapses can control the storage rate of visual objects. We discuss specific predictions of our model about cognitive effects of NMDA-antagonists and schizophrenia.
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  4.  20
    Marr Versus Marr: On the Notion of Levels.Frank van der Velde, Gezinus Wolters & A. H. C. van der Heijden - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):681-682.
  5.  36
    Contrasts and Dissociations Suggest Qualitative Differences Between Conscious and Unconscious Processes.Gezinus Wolters & R. Hans Phaf - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):359-360.
    The authors reject a computationally powerful unconscious. Instead, they suggest that simple unconscious processes give rise to complex conscious representations. We discuss evidence showing contrastive effects of conscious and unconscious processes, suggesting a distinction between these types of processes. In our view, conscious processes often serve to correct or control negative consequences of relatively simple unconscious processes.
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  6.  13
    "ViSA: A Neurodynamic Model for Visuo-Spatial Working Memory, Attentional Blink, and Conscious Access": Correction to Simione Et Al.Luca Simione, Antonino Raffone, Gezinus Wolters, Paola Salmas, Chie Nakatani, Marta Olivetti Belardinelli & Cees van Leeuwen - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (4):769-769.
  7.  16
    How Are Events Represented?Gezinus Wolters & Antonino Raffone - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):908-909.
    We note two important problems in the Theory of Event Coding. First, because the representational format of features and events is unspecified, the theory is difficult to test. Second, the theory lacks a mechanism for the integration of features into an event code when the features are shared by different events. Possible ways of solving these problems are suggested.
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  8.  13
    Constructing Consciousness.Gezinus Wolters & R. Hans Phaf - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):174-174.
    O'Brien & Opie make unnecessary distinctions between vehicle and process theories and neglect empirically based distinctions between conscious and unconscious processing. We argue that phenomenal experience emerges, not just as a byproduct of input-driven parallel distributed processing, but as a result of constructive processing in recurrent neural networks. Stable network states may be necessary, but are not sufficient, for consciousness.
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  9. A Competitive Manifesto.R. Hans Phaf & Gezinus Wolters - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):487-488.
    The distinction made by Page between localist and distributed representations seems confounded by the distinction between competitive and associative learning. His manifesto can also be read as a plea for competitive learning. The power of competitive models can even be extended further, by simulating similarity effects in forced-choice perceptual identification (Ratcliff & McKoon 1997) that have defied explanation by most memory models.
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