10 found
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  1. Country Reports.Ma'N. H. Zawati, Don Chalmers, Sueli G. Dallari, Marina de Neiva Borba, Miriam Pinkesz, Yann Joly, Haidan Chen, Mette Hartlev, Liis Leitsalu, Sirpa Soini, Emmanuelle Rial-Sebbag, Nils Hoppe, Tina Garani-Papadatos, Panagiotis Vidalis, Krishna Ravi Srinivas, Gil Siegal, Stefania Negri, Ryoko Hatanaka, Maysa Al-Hussaini, Amal Al-Tabba', Lourdes Motta-Murgía, Laura Estela Torres Moran, Aart Hendriks, Obiajulu Nnamuchi, Rosario Isasi, Dorota Krekora-Zajac, Eman Sadoun, Calvin Ho, Pamela Andanda, Won Bok Lee, Pilar Nicolás, Titti Mattsson, Vladislava Talanova, Alexandre Dosch, Dominique Sprumont, Chien-Te Fan, Tzu-Hsun Hung, Jane Kaye, Andelka Phillips, Heather Gowans, Nisha Shah & James W. Hazel - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (4):582-704.
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  2.  24
    Closing the Organ Gap: A Reciprocity-Based Social Contract Approach.Gil Siegal & Richard J. Bonnie - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):415-423.
    Organ transplantation has become a proven, cost-effective lifesaving treatment, but its promise is contingent on the number of available organs. The growing gap between the demand and supply results in unnecessary loss and diminished quality of life as well as high costs for surviving patients and health insurers. Twenty years after the enactment of the National Organ Transplantation Act, it is time to rethink the moral basis and overall design of organ transplantation policy. We propose a national plan for organ (...)
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  3.  6
    Closing the Organ Gap: A Reciprocity-Based Social Contract Approach.Gil Siegal & Richard J. Bonnie - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):415-423.
    Organ transplantation remains one of modern medicine's remarkable achievements. It saves lives, improves quality of life, diminishes healthcare expenditures in end-stage renal patients, and enjoys high success rates. Yet the promise of transplantation is substantially compromised by the scarcity of organs. The gap between the number of patients on waiting lists and the number of available organs continues to grow. As of January 2006, the combined waiting list for all organs in the United States was 90,284. Unfortunately, thousands of potential (...)
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  4.  10
    Ethical Issues in Nanomedicine: Tempest in a Teapot?Irit Allon, Ahmi Ben-Yehudah, Raz Dekel, Jan-Helge Solbakk, Klaus-Michael Weltring & Gil Siegal - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (1):3-11.
    Nanomedicine offers remarkable options for new therapeutic avenues. As methods in nanomedicine advance, ethical questions conjunctly arise. Nanomedicine is an exceptional niche in several aspects as it reflects risks and uncertainties not encountered in other areas of medical research or practice. Nanomedicine partially overlaps, partially interlocks and partially exceeds other medical disciplines. Some interpreters agree that advances in nanotechnology may pose varied ethical challenges, whilst others argue that these challenges are not new and that nanotechnology basically echoes recurrent bioethical dilemmas. (...)
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  5.  14
    On Blind Spots, Moral Obligations, and Collective Action Problems.Gil Siegal - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):20-22.
  6.  9
    Genomic Databases and Biobanks in Israel.Gil Siegal - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (4):766-775.
    In addressing the creation and regulation of biobanks in different countries, a short descriptive introduction to the social and cultural backgrounds of each country is mandatory. The State of Israel is relatively young, and can be characterized as a multi-religious, multi-ethnic, multi-cultural society, somewhat similar to the American melting pot. The current population is 8.3 million, a sharp rise resulting from a 1.2 million influx of immigrants from the former Soviet Union in the 1990s. Seventyfive percent are Jewish, 20% Arabs, (...)
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  7.  28
    Personalized Disclosure by Information-on-Demand: Attending to Patients' Needs in the Informed Consent Process.Gil Siegal, Richard J. Bonnie & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):359-367.
    Obtaining informed consent has typically become a stylized ritual of presenting and signing a form, in which physicians are acting defensively and patients lack control over the content and flow of information. This leaves patients at risk both for being under-informed relative to their decisional needs and of receiving more information than they need or desire. By personalizing the process of seeking and receiving information and allowing patients to specify their desire for information in a prospective manner, we aim to (...)
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  8.  20
    Reflections on Fairness in UNOS Allocation Policies.Gil Siegal & Richard J. Bonnie - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):28 – 29.
  9.  12
    Personalized Disclosure by Information-on-Demand: Attending to Patients' Needs in the Informed Consent Process.Gil Siegal, Richard J. Bonnie & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):359-367.
    In an explicit attempt to reduce physician paternalism and encourage patient participation in making health care decisions, the informed consent doctrine has become a foundational precept in medical ethics and health law. The underlying ethical principle on which informed consent rests — autonomy — embodies the idea that as rational moral agents, patients should be in command of decisions that relate to their bodies and lives. The corollary obligation of physicians to respect and facilitate patient autonomy is reflected in the (...)
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  10.  4
    Promoting Organ Donation Registration with the Priority Incentive: Israeli Transplantation Surgeons' and Other Medical Practitioners' Views and Ethical Concerns.Nurit Guttman, Gil Siegal, Naama Appel-Doron & Gitit Bar‐On - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (5):527-541.
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