Results for 'Gisela G. S. Castro'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Cultura da mídia, cultura do consumo: imagem e espetáculo no discurso pós-moderno.Rose de Melo Rocha & Gisela G. S. Castro - 2010 - Logos: Comuniação e Univerisdade 16 (1):48-59.
    Esse artigo discute a intensa imbricação entre mídia, cultura e consumo, tomando esta articulação como um aspecto central no contexto contemporâneo. Será analisado o papel do entretenimento e das paisagens audiovisuais como principais produtos da cultura midiática, sendo a espetacularização e a estetização do cotidiano entendidos como eixos organizadores dos padrões econômicos e socioculturais do mundo atual. Discutiremos a centralidade da visualidade na pós-modernidade, sem descurar da forte pregnância da sonoridade e da escuta nas nossas práticas culturais. Sendo assim, propomos (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  86
    Niermeyer J. F., Mediae Latinitatis lexicon minus. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1976. Pp. xviii, 1138. 280 Glds. van de Kieft C., Lake-Schoonebeek G. S. M. M., Abbreviationes et index fontium [to Niermeyer's Lexicon]. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1976. Pp. xix, 78. [REVIEW]C. G. - 1977 - Speculum 52 (4):1081.
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  16
    Plato's Thoughts. By G. M. A. Grube. Pp. Xviii + 320. London: Methuen, 1935. 12s. 6d. - Greek Ideals and Modern Life. By R. W. Livingstone. Pp. X + 175. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1935. 6s. - The Political Philosophies of Plato and Hegel. By M. B. Foster. Pp. Xii + 207. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1935. 7s. 6d. [REVIEW]M. Y. G. - 1936 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 56 (1):110-111.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  63
    Pauly's Real-Encyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft. Herausg. von G. Wissowa und W. Kroll. 16ter Halbband (Hestiaia—Hyagnis), and Supplement II. 2 vols. 8vo., cols. 1313–2628, and in Supplement, cols. 520. Stuttgart: Metzler, 1913. 16ter Halbband, M.15; Supplement, M.7. [REVIEW]F. H. G. - 1914 - The Classical Review 28 (05):177-178.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  72
    Pauly's Real-Encyclopädie der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft. Neue Bearbeitung…herausgegeben von G. Wissowa. Xllter Halbband, Euxantios—Fornaces (cols. 1537–2876); XIliter Halbband, Fornax—Glykon (cols. 1–1472). Stuttgart: Metzler, 1909, 1910. [REVIEW]F. H. G. - 1911 - The Classical Review 25 (07):228-.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  12
    The Fragments of Sophocles. Edited, with Additional Notes From the Papers of SirR. C. Jebb and Dr.W. G. Headlam, by A. C. Pearson, M.A., Formerly Scholar of Christ's College, Cambridge. Three Volumes. Pp. C + 270, 0 + 330, X + 339. Cambridge University Press, 1917. Price £2 5s. [REVIEW]M. G. - 1917 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 37:232-233.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  47
    Pauly's Real-Encyclopädie der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft. Herausg. Von G. Wissowa Und W. Kroll. 16ter Halbband , and Supplement II. 2 Vols. 8vo., Cols. 1313–2628, and in Supplement, Cols. 520. Stuttgart: Metzler, 1913. 16ter Halbband, M.15; Supplement, M.7. [REVIEW]F. H. G. - 1914 - The Classical Review 28 (5):177-178.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  27
    Pauly's Real-Encyclopädie der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft. Neue Bearbeitung…Herausgegeben von G. Wissowa. Xllter Halbband, Euxantios—Fornaces ; XIliter Halbband, Fornax—Glykon . Stuttgart: Metzler, 1909, 1910. [REVIEW]F. H. G. - 1911 - The Classical Review 25 (7):228-228.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Economists in Discussion the Correspondence Between G.L.S. Shackle and Stephen F. Frowen, 1951-1992.Stephen F. Frowen & G. L. S. Shackle - 2004
  10. The Presocratic Philosophers a Critical History with a Selection of Texts /by G.S. Kirk, J.E. Raven, M. Schofield. --. --. [REVIEW]G. S. Kirk, J. Raven & Malcolm Schofield - 1983 - Cambridge University Press, 1983.
  11. The Presocratic Philosophers a Critical History with a Selection of Texts, by G.S. Kirk & J.E. Raven.G. S. Kirk & John Earle Jt Author Raven - 1962 - University Press.
  12. Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative.Kathy Behrendt - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, Sebald (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. G. A. Cohen’s Vision of Socialism.Nicholas Vrousalis - 2010 - The Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):185-216.
    This essay is an attempt to piece together the elements of G. A. Cohen's thought on the theory of socialism during his long intellectual voyage from Marxism to political philosophy. It begins from his theory of the maldistribution of freedom under capitalism, moves onto his critique of libertarian property rights, to his diagnosis of the “deep inegalitarian” structure of John Rawls' theory and concludes with his rejection of the “cheap” fraternity promulgated by liberal egalitarianism. The paper's exegetical contention is that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14.  71
    Incentives and Justice: G.A. Cohen's Egalitarian Critique of Rawls.Paul Smith - 1998 - Social Theory and Practice 24 (2):205-235.
    An egalitarian interpretation and defence of Rawls's principles of justice and their institutional and policy implications in response to G. A. Cohen's criticisms of Rawls's alleged justification of unequalizing incentives. Keywords Applied Philosophy Social and Political Philosophy Rawls G.A. Cohen difference priciple incentives justice property-owning democracy.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  68
    On Justice and Other Values: G.A. Cohen's Political Philosophy and the Problem of Trade-Offs.Michele Bocchiola & Federico Zuolo - 2013 - Philosophical Papers 42 (1):1 - 24.
    (2013). On Justice and Other Values: G.A. Cohen's Political Philosophy and the Problem of Trade-offs. Philosophical Papers: Vol. 42, No. 1, pp. 1-24. doi: 10.1080/05568641.2013.774721.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  38
    (G.A. Cohen's) Rescuing Justice and Equality—A Critical Engagement.Helga Varden - 2010 - Social Philosophy Today 26:175-189.
    This paper engages G. A. Cohen's "Rescuing Justice and Equality." The paper was originally written as a part of the NASSP (North American Society for Social Philosophy) Book Award session in 2008.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Distributive Justice and Access to Advantage: G. A. Cohen's Egalitarianism.Alexander Kaufman (ed.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    G. A. Cohen was one of the world's leading political theorists. He was noted, in particular, for his contributions to the literature of egalitarian justice. Cohen's classic writings offer one of the most influential responses to the currency of the egalitarian justice question - the question, that is, of whether egalitarians should seek to equalize welfare, resources, opportunity, or some other indicator of well-being. Underlying Cohen's argument is the intuition that the purpose of egalitarianism is to eliminate disadvantage for which (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. This Is Art: A Defence of R. G. Collingwood's Philosophy of Art.James Camien McGuiggan - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Southampton
    R. G. Collingwood’s 'The Principles of Art' argues that art is the expression of emotion. This dissertation offers a new interpretation of that philosophy, and argues that this interpretation is both hermeneutically and philosophically plausible. The offered interpretation differs from the received interpretation most significantly in treating the concept of ‘art’ as primarily scalarly rather than binarily realisable (this is introduced in ch. 1), and in understanding Collingwood’s use of the term ‘emotion’ more broadly (introduced in ch. 2). -/- After (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Cartan-Einstein Unification with Teleparallelism and the Discrepant Measurements of Newton's Constant G.Jose G. Vargas & Douglas G. Torr - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (2):145-200.
    We show that in 1929 Cartan and Einstein almost produced a theory in which the electromagnetic (EM) field constitutes the time-like 2-form part of the torsion of Finslerian teleparallel connections on pseudo-Riemannian metrics. The primitive state of the theory of these connections would not, and did not, permit Cartan and Einstein to realize how their torsion field equations contained the Maxwell system and how the Finslerian torsion contains the EM field. Cartan and Einstein discussed curvature field equations, though failing to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  18
    Ambiguity and Belief1: S. G. Williams.S. G. Williams - 2002 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:253-278.
    This paper is concerned with the notion of ambiguity—or what I shall refer to more generally as homonymy—and its bearing upon various familiar puzzles about intensional contexts. It would hardly of course be a novel claim that the unravelling of such puzzles may well involve recourse to something like ambiguity. After all, Frege, who bequeathed to us one of the most enduring of the puzzles, proposed as part of his solution an analysis of intensional contexts according to which all expressions (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  30
    Plurality and Continuity: An Essay in G. F. Stout’s Theory of Universals.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1987 - Idealistic Studies 17 (3):275-277.
    This work sets out to state and evaluate G. F. Stout’s views on concrete particular things, properties, universals, etc., and to develop some of the author’s own views concerning them. It is useful to have Stout’s position described in a single monograph, for his own statements are scattered. As D. M. Armstrong indicates in a foreword, Stout’s view that the properties of and relations between concrete things are particulars rather than universals is important as the main explicit statement of a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  8
    Plurality and Continuity: An Essay in G. F. Stout’s Theory of Universals. [REVIEW]T. L. S. Sprigge - 1987 - Idealistic Studies 17 (3):275-277.
    This work sets out to state and evaluate G. F. Stout’s views on concrete particular things, properties, universals, etc., and to develop some of the author’s own views concerning them. It is useful to have Stout’s position described in a single monograph, for his own statements are scattered. As D. M. Armstrong indicates in a foreword, Stout’s view that the properties of and relations between concrete things are particulars rather than universals is important as the main explicit statement of a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. General Bibliography of C.G. Jung's Writings.C. G. Jung - 1979 - Routledge.
    This bibliography records the initial publication of each original work by C.G. Jung, each translation, and significant revisions and expansions of both, up to 1975. In nearly every case, the compilers have examined the publications in German, French and English. Translations are recorded in Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Greek Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish. It is arranged according to language, with German and English first, publications being listed chronologically in each language. (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. On the Meta-Ethical Status of Constructivism: Reflections on G.A. Cohen's `Facts and Principles'.Miriam Ronzoni & Laura Valentini - 2008 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (4):403-422.
    The Queen's College, Oxford, UK In his article `Facts and Principles', G.A. Cohen attempts to refute constructivist approaches to justification by showing that, contrary to what their proponents claim, fundamental normative principles are fact- in sensitive. We argue that Cohen's `fact-insensitivity thesis' does not provide a successful refutation of constructivism because it pertains to an area of meta-ethics which differs from the one tackled by constructivists. While Cohen's thesis concerns the logical structure of normative principles, constructivists ask how normative principles (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  25. On the Origins of the Contemporary Notion of Propositional Content: Anti-Psychologism in Nineteenth-Century Psychology and G.E. Moore’s Early Theory of Judgment.Consuelo Preti - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (2):176-185.
    I argue that the familiar picture of the rise of analytic philosophy through the early work of G. E. Moore and Bertrand Russell is incomplete and to some degree erroneous. Archival evidence suggests that a considerable influence on Moore, especially evident in his 1899 paper ‘The nature of judgment,’ comes from the literature in nineteenth-century empirical psychology rather than nineteenth-century neo-Hegelianism, as is widely believed. I argue that the conceptual influences of Moore’s paper are more likely to have had their (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’.James Owen Weatherall - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. On the Theoretical Significance of G. A. Cohen’s Fact-Insensitivity Thesis.Kyle Johannsen - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (2):245-53.
    G. A. Cohen’s claim that fundamental principles are ‘fact-insensitive’ has not received an especially warm welcome from the philosophical community. While some philosophers have expressed doubts about the plausibility of his claim, others have complained that even if his thesis is true, it is also relatively insignificant. In my paper, I argue that the fact-insensitivity thesis, if true, provides considerable support for value pluralism, and is thus of interest for that reason. Though Cohen himself assumes a plurality of fundamental principles, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  24
    G. A. Cohen’s Vision of Socialism.Nicholas Vrousalis - 2010 - Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):185-216.
    This essay is an attempt to piece together the elements of G. A. Cohen’s thought on the theory of socialism during his long intellectual voyage from Marxism to political philosophy. It begins from his theory of the maldistribution of freedom under capitalism, moves onto his critique of libertarian property rights, to his diagnosis of the “deep inegalitarian” structure of John Rawls’ theory and concludes with his rejection of the “cheap” fraternity promulgated by liberal egalitarianism. The paper’s exegetical contention is that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29. The Spirit of Logical Empiricism: Carl G. Hempel's Role in Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Science.Wesley C. Salmon - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (3):333-350.
    In this paper, I discuss the key role played by Carl G. Hempel's work on theoretical realism and scientific explanation in effecting a crucial philosophical transition between the beginning and the end of the twentieth century. At the beginning of the century, the dominant view was that science is incapable of furnishing explanations of natural phenomena; at the end, explanation is widely viewed as an important, if not the primary, goal of science. In addition to its intellectual benefits, this transition (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30.  30
    Catching Up with Wells: The Political Theory of H. G. Wells’s Science Fiction.Emma Planinc - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (5):637-658.
    H. G. Wells’s The Rights of Man —which provided the groundwork for the 1948 UN Declaration of Human Rights—has been re-released with a new Introduction by novelist Ali Smith, who reminds us of Wells’s political prophetic call for “a real federation of mankind,” and of the fact that we have still failed to meet the future he envisioned. If we are to catch up with Wells, we must, however, examine the foundations of Wells’s “cosmopolitan” vision, which requires examining both his (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  44
    A Departure Between Two Extremes: R. G. Collingwood’s Religion and Philosophy Reconsidered.Junichi Kasuga - 2011 - Idealistic Studies 41 (1):31-43.
    This paper aims to analyze R. G. Collingwood’s maiden work in philosophy, Religion and Philosophy, in the light of the realism/idealism dispute in early twentieth-century British philosophy. Due to scholars’ narrow scopes of interests, this book has suffered divided and unsettled understandings in literature that find only either realist or idealist character in it. By contrast, I comprehensively examine various aspects of the work on which both readings rest in turn—his conception of history and metaphysics. Consequently, I find out that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  48
    Prejudices and Horizons: G. F. Meier's.Riccardo Pozzo - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (2).
    : The object of G. F. Meier's Vernunftlehre and its abridgement for courses, the Auszug aus der Vernunftlehre, does not consist exclusively in the elaboration of the formal aspects of logic, but rather in the individuation of the elements of thought and language, which make human understanding possible. Instead of limiting himself to formal truth, Meier investigates the realms of epistemic, aesthetic, and historic truths, of horizons, and prejudices. Kant used both Meier's Vernunftlehre and its Auszug for about forty years (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33. Arthur G. Tansley’s ‘New Psychology’ and its Relation to Ecology.Joachim L. Dagg - 2007 - Web Ecology 2007.
    In 1935, A. G. Tansley, who was knighted later, proposed the ecosystem concept. Nevertheless, this concept was not without predecessors. Why did Tansley’s ecosystem prevail and not one of its competitors? The purpose of this article is to pin the distinguishing features of Tansley’s ecosystem down, as far as the published record allows. It is an exercise in finding the difference that made a difference. Besides being a pioneering ecologist, Tansley was an adept of psychoanalysis. His interest even led him (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  83
    Language as Encoding Thought Vs. Language as Medium of Thought: On the Question of J. G. Fichte’s Influence on Wilhelm von Humboldt.David Vessey - 2006 - Idealistic Studies 36 (3):219-234.
    In this paper I take up the question of the possible influence of J. G. Fichte on Wilhelm von Humboldt’s theory of language. I first argue that the historical record is unclear, but show that there is a deep philosophical difference between the two views and, as a result of this difference, we should conclude that the influence was small. Drawing on a distinction made by Michael Dummett, I show that Fichte understands language as encoding thought while Humboldt understands language (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  50
    Interpreting and Extending G. H. Mead's "Metaphysics" of Selfhood and Agency.Jack Martin - 2007 - Philosophical Psychology 20 (4):441 – 456.
    G. H. Mead developed an alternative "metaphysics" of selfhood and agency that underlies, but is seldom made explicit in discussions of, his social developmental psychology. This is an alternative metaphysics that rejects any pregiven, fixed foundations for being and knowing. It assumes the emergence of social psychological phenomena such as mind, self, and deliberative agency through the activity of human actors and interactors within their biophysical and sociocultural world. Of central importance to the emergence of self-consciousness and deliberative forms of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36.  52
    From Hayek to Keynes: G.L.S. Shackle and Ignorance of the Future.Greg Hill - 2004 - Critical Review 16 (1):53-79.
    G.L.S. Shackle stood at the historic crossroads where the economics of Hayek and Keynes met. Shackle fused these opposing lines of thought in a macroeconomic theory that draws Keynesian conclusions from Austrian premises. In Shackle 's scheme of thought, the power to imagine alternative courses of action releases decision makers from the web of predictable causation. But the spontaneous and unpredictable choices that originate in the subjective and disparate orientations of individual agents deny us the possibility of rational expectations, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  71
    Critical Notice, G. A. Cohen, Marx's Theory of History. [REVIEW]Henry Laycock - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):335-356.
    Mills writes: G. A. Cohen's influential ‘technological determinist’ reading of Marx's theory of history rests in part on an interpretation of Marx's use of ‘material’ whose idiosyncrasy has been insufficiently noticed. Cohen takes historical materialism to be asserting the determination of the social by the material/asocial, viz. ‘socio‐neutral’ facts about human nature and human rationality which manifest themselves in a historical tendency for the forces of production to develop. This paper reviews Marx's writings to demonstrate the extensive textual evidence in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  15
    The Social Role of Understanding in G. K. Chesterton's Detective Fiction.Omer Schwartz - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):54-70.
    G. K. Chesterton's fictional detectives stand in stark methodical contrast to scientific detectives such as Sherlock Holmes. While the scientific detective focuses on external reality, seeking to reconstruct the crime, Chesterton's detectives—and Father Brown in particular—are preoccupied with inner perceptions, devoting their energy to understanding other minds. While Holmes may be seen as a positivist driven by the physical sciences, Chesterton's detectives are exegetes, perceiving human beings as a unique species demanding a distinctive approach. They thus reflect Chesterton's view that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  67
    A Response to G.B. Bagci’s “Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber Collapse Theory and Whiteheadian Process Philosophy”.William M. Kallfelz - 2009 - Process Studies 38 (2):394-411.
    I examine G.B. Bagci’s arguments for the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber interpretation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics as ideally suited for Whitehead’s philosophy. Much of Bagci’s claims are in response to Michael Epperson, who argues in the same vein in favor of decoherence accounts. Pace Epperson, I do not think that decoherence is the final arbiter here, and instead I contrast GRW with several other accounts addressing foundational problems of quantum theory, which also account for relativistic covariance, while GRW does not. I argue that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  64
    Critical Notice of G.A. Cohen’s Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality. [REVIEW]Peter Vallentyne - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):609-626.
    G.A. Cohen’s book brings together and elaborates on articles that he has written on selfownership, on Marx’s theory of exploitation, and on the future of socialism. Although seven of the eleven chapters have been previously published (1977-1992), this is not merely a collection of articles. There is a superb introduction that gives an overview of how the chapters fit together and of their historical relation to each other. Most chapters have a new introduction and often a postscript or addendum that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  62
    A Passion for Justice’: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s and G. W. F. Hegel on ‘World-Historical Individuals.Jim Vernon - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):187-207.
    In this article, I explicate Martin Luther King, Jr.’s account of emancipatory history and activism by examining the influence of G. W. F. Hegel’s account of world-historical individuals on his thought. Both thinkers, I argue, affirm that history’s spiritual destiny works through individuals who are driven by the contingencies of their subjective character and given situation to undertake particular actions, and yet who nevertheless freely and decisively break the new from the old by forsaking subjective satisfaction to spur events forward (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  55
    Wittgenstein's Method: Neglected Aspects By Gordon Baker. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004 Pp. 328. £40.00 HB. . Wittgenstein's Copernican Revolution: The Question of Linguistic Idealism By Ilham Dilman. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002. Pp. 240. £52.50 HB. Wittgenstein: Connections and Controversies By P. M. S. Hacker. Oxford: Oxford University Press, . Pp. 400. £45.00 HB; £19.99 PB. Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: An Introduction By David G. Stern. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. 224. £40.00 HB; £10.99 PB. [REVIEW]PhilRupert Hutchinson Reed - 2005 - Philosophy 80 (3):432.
    Wittgenstein's Method: Neglected Aspects By Gordon Baker. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004 pp. 328. £40.00 HB.. Wittgenstein's Copernican Revolution: The Question of Linguistic Idealism By Ilham Dilman. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002. pp. 240. £52.50 HB. Wittgenstein: Connections and Controversies By P. M. S. Hacker. Oxford: Oxford University Press,. pp. 400. £45.00 HB; £19.99 PB. Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: An Introduction By David G. Stern. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. pp. 224. £40.00 HB; £10.99 PB.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  32
    G.H. Mead's Understanding of the Nature of Speech in the Light of Contemporary Research.Timothy J. Gallagher - 2012 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):40-62.
    The following analysis demonstrates that G.H. Mead's understanding of human speech is remarkably consistent with today's interdisciplinary field that studies speech as a natural behavior with an evolutionary history. Mead seems to have captured major empirical and theoretical insights more than half a century before the contemporary field began to take shape. In that field the framework known as “Tinbergen's Four Questions,” developed in ecology to study naturally occurring behavior in nonhuman animals, has been an effective organizing framework for research (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  43
    All Causality Occurs in a Present: G.H. Mead’s Proposal to Process Philosophy.Edgar A. Towne - 2010 - Process Studies 39 (1):87-105.
    G.H. Mead and A.N. Whitehead agree that all causation occurs in a present, that the self is social, and that philosophical description of the new physics of relativity and quantum mechanics is a complicated task. I explore this complexity in relation to the knowledge of events unable to be observed here and now, especially past historical events. The integration of the two philosophers’ views is shown in reference to Whitehead’s criteria of respect for facts and coherence. By reference to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  6
    ‘A New and Hopeful Type of Social Organism’: Julian Huxley, J.G. Crowther and Lancelot Hogben on Roosevelt's New Deal.Oliver Hill-Andrews - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (4):645-671.
    The admiration of the Soviet Union amongst Britain's interwar scientific left is well known. This article reveals a parallel story. Focusing on the biologists Julian Huxley and Lancelot Hogben and the scientific journalist J.G. Crowther, I show that a number of scientific thinkers began to look west, to the US. In the mid- to late 1930s and into the 1940s, Huxley, Crowther and Hogben all visited the US and commented favourably on Roosevelt's New Deal, in particular its experimental approach to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  2
    Wittgenstein and G. H. Von Wright’s Path to The Varieties of Goodness.Lassi Johannes Jakola - 2020 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 9.
    The development of G. H. von Wright’s work in ethics is traced from the early 1950s to the publication of The Varieties of Goodness in 1963, with special focus on the influences stemming from Wittgenstein’s later thought. In 1952, von Wright published an essay suggesting a formal analysis of the concept of value. This attempt was soon abandoned. The change of approach took place at the time von Wright started his work on Wittgenstein’s Nachlass and tried to articulate the main (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  36
    Challenging Capitalism as Religion: Hans G. Ulrich's Theological and Ethical Reflections On the Economy.W. Palaver - 2007 - Studies in Christian Ethics 20 (2):215-230.
    The following article starts by summarising how much modern capitalism is characterised by its religious structure. The world of branding — consumer goods becoming religiously attractive — and religious metaphors that have become necessary to describe contemporary neoliberalism are key examples. A second step consists in describing four typical aspects of religious capitalism in the following of Walter Benjamin's fragment `Capitalism as Religion' from 1921. Against this background I thirdly summarise Hans G. Ulrich's theological ethics concerning the economy. At the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  12
    Expression of Emotion and Artistic Truth: R. G. Collingwood’s Debt to the Aesthetics of John Ruskin.Heta Häyry - 1994 - Idealistic Studies 24 (1):43-52.
    In his book The Principles of Art Robin George Collingwood presents a theory of art as the expression of emotion. The connection between his view and the theories of the Italian neo-idealists Benedetto Croce and Giovanni Gentile is both well known and well documented. What seems to be less known, however, is the intellectual link R. G. Collingwood’s father, William Gershom Collingwood, formed between his son and John Ruskin, the great Victorian essayist, critic and reformer. There are some references in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Community, Equality, and Value Pluralism in G. A. Cohen's Why Not Socialism?David O'Brien - 2012 - Florida Philosophical Review 12 (1):17-31.
    In Why Not Socialism? G.A. Cohen articulates a version of socialism characterized by two values—equality and community—but, being a value pluralist, Cohen is not sanguine about the practical consistency of those values. This paper deals with the relationship between Cohen's formulations of the values of community and equality. I argue that Cohen faces a dilemma: either community and equality are not even in principle consistent, or else they are conceptually compatible. I argue, moreover, that despite the cost to Cohen's value (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  31
    Expression of Emotion and Artistic Truth: R. G. Collingwood’s Debt to the Aesthetics of John Ruskin.Heta Häyry - 1994 - Idealistic Studies 24 (1):43-52.
    In his book The Principles of Art Robin George Collingwood presents a theory of art as the expression of emotion. The connection between his view and the theories of the Italian neo-idealists Benedetto Croce and Giovanni Gentile is both well known and well documented. What seems to be less known, however, is the intellectual link R. G. Collingwood’s father, William Gershom Collingwood, formed between his son and John Ruskin, the great Victorian essayist, critic and reformer. There are some references in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000