Search results for 'God' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Richard Swinburne (2004). The Existence of God. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   85 citations  
  2. Hugh Chandler, Paley's 'Proof' of the Existence of God.
    Paleysproofof the existence of God, or some supposed version of it, is well known. In this paper I offer the real thing and two (...)objections to it. One objection is my own, and the other is provided by Darwin. (shrink)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. William P. Alston (1991). Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction i. Character of the Book The central thesis of this book is that experiential awareness of God, or as I shall be saying, the perception of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   88 citations  
  4.  81
    Hugh Chandler, Personal God or Something Greater.
    Alvin Plantinga says that according to classical Muslim, Jewish, and Christian belief, God is a person. (He spells out some of the characteristics of people as such.) (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Erik Wielenberg (2009). Dawkins's Gambit, Hume's Aroma, and God's Simplicity. Philosophia Christi 11 (1):113-127.
    I examine the central atheistic argument of Richard Dawkinss book The God Delusion (“Dawkinss Gambit”) and illustrate its failure. I further show that Dawkinss Gambit (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6. Emmanuel Lévinas (1998). Of God Who Comes to Mind. Stanford University Press.
    Emmanuel Levinas is one of the most original philosophers in the twentieth century. In this book, continuing his thought on obligation, he investigates the possibility that the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  7.  51
    Brian Leftow (2012). God and Necessity. Oxford University Press.
    Modal basics -- Some solutions -- Theist solutions -- The ontology of possibility -- Modal truthmakers -- Modality and the divine nature -- Deity as essential -- Against deity theories -- The (...)role of deity -- The biggest bang -- Divine concepts -- Concepts, syntax, and actualism -- Modality: basic notions -- The genesis of secular modality -- Modal reality -- Essences -- Non-secular modalities -- Theism and modal semantics -- Freedom, preference, and cost -- Explaining modal status -- Explaining the necessary -- Against theistic platonism -- Worlds and the existence of God. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  8.  16
    Richard Oxenberg, Suffering, Bliss, and the Spiritual Ladder: Attempting a Glimpse Into the Heart of God.
    Whence comes suffering? If the divine reality is a reality of bliss, and all is derived from this divine reality, how can suffering arise? Does the reality (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. C. Stephen Evans (2010). Natural Signs and Knowledge of God: A New Look at Theistic Arguments. Oxford University Press.
    Is there such a thing as natural knowledge of God? C. Stephen Evans presents the case for understanding theistic arguments as expressions of natural signs in order (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  10.  12
    Paul K. Moser (2009). The Evidence for God: Religious Knowledge Reexamined. Cambridge University Press.
    If God exists, where can we find adequate evidence for God's existence? In this book, Paul Moser offers a new perspective on the evidence for God (...)that centers on a morally robust version of theism that is cognitively resilient. The resulting evidence for God is not speculative, abstract, or casual. Rather, it is morally and existentially challenging to humans, as they themselves responsively and willingly become evidence of God's reality in receiving and reflecting God's moral character for others. Moser calls this 'personifying evidence of God,' because it requires the evidence to be personified in an intentional agent - such as a human - and thereby to be inherent evidence of an intentional agent. Contrasting this approach with skepticism, scientific naturalism, fideism, and natural theology, Moser also grapples with the potential problems of divine hiddenness, religious diversity, and vast evil. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  11.  12
    Herman Philipse (2012). God in the Age of Science?: A Critique of Religious Reason. Oxford University Press.
    Herman Philipse puts forward a powerful new critique of belief in God. He examines the strategies that have been used for the philosophical defence of religious belief, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  12. Guy Kahane (2011). Should We Want God to Exist? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):674-696.
    Whether God exists is a metaphysical question. But there is also a neglected evaluative question about Gods existence: Should we want God to exist? Very many, (...)including many atheists and agnostics, appear to think we should. Theists claim that if God didnt exist things would be far worse, and many atheists agree; they regret Gods inexistence. Some remarks by Thomas Nagel suggest an opposing view: that we should want God not to exist. I call this view anti-theism. I explain how such view can be coherent, and why it might be correct. Anti-theism must be distinguished from the argument from evil or the denial of Gods goodness; it is a claim about the goodness of Gods existence. Anti-theists must claim that its a logical consequence of Gods existence that things are worse in certain respects. The problem is that Gods existence would also make things better in many ways. Given that Gods existence is likely to be impersonally better overall, anti-theists face a challenge similar to that facing nonconsequentialists. I explore two ways of meeting this challenge. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  13. Arman Hovhannisyan, God and Reality.
    Metaphysics has done everything to involve God in the world of being. However, in case of considering Reality as being and nothingness, naturally, the metaphysical approach toward (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  65
    Gary C. Hatfield (1979). Force (God) in Descartes' Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 10 (2):113-140.
    It is difficult to evaluate the role of activity - of force or of that which has causal efficacy - in Descartesnatural philosophy. On the one hand, (...)Descartes claims to include in his natural philosophy only that which can be described geometrically, which amounts to matter (extended substance) in motion (where this motion is described kinematically).’ Yet on the other hand, rigorous adherence to a purely geometrical description of matter in motion would make it difficult to account for the interactions among the particles that constitute Descartesuniverse, since the notions of extension and kinematical motion do not in themselves imply any causal agency. There is, after all, no reason to expect that a particle whose single essence is extension, even if we suppose it to be moving, should impart motion to another particle, while conversely, there is no reason to expect a resting particle to hinder the motion of an impinging one. Descartes' hankering for an austere ontology of matter in motion is in danger of excluding causal agency (force, conceived dynmically) from matter. To the modern reader it may seem obvious that Descartes did not get himself into such a fix, since matter in motion so readily reminds us of kinetic energy or of some more primitive notion of force. Yet by no means is it obvious that Descartes attributed causal efficacy to matter in motion per se. Serious scholars have held opposite positions on this issue. Westfall, Gabbey, and othershave argued that although on the metaphysical plane Descartes attempted to eliminate force from his mechanical universe, nonethelessforce is a real featureof his mechanical world. The thrust of this view is that Descartes conceived of force asthe capacity of a body in motion to act’, by means of impact, upon other bodies. An opposing interpretation, defended here, is that Descartes did in fact deny causal agency to moving matter per se, restricting agency to immaterial substances such as the human mind, angels, and God. The intention of this interpretation is not to de-emphasize the role of matter in motion in Descartesexplanation of nature, but rather to stress the fact that Descartes did not conceive of this moving matter dynamically. -/- Reprinted in Descartes, ed. by J. Cottingham, Oxford Readings in Philosophy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998), 281310. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   50 citations  
  15. Rob Lovering (2009). On What God Would Do. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (2):87-104.
    Many debates in the philosophy of religion, particularly arguments for and against the existence of God, depend on a claim or set of claims about what God (...)qua sovereign, omnipotent, omniscient, and perfectly good beingwould do , either directly or indirectly, in particular cases or in general. Accordingly, before these debates can be resolved we must first settle the more fundamental issue of whether we can know, or at least have justified belief about, what God would do. In this paper, I lay out the possible positions on the issue of whether we can know what God would do, positions I refer to as Broad Skeptical Theism, Broad Epistemic Theism, and Narrow Skeptical Theism. I then examine the implications of each of these views and argue that each presents serious problems for theism. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  70
    Richard Swinburne (1994). The Christian God. Oxford University Press.
    What is it for there to be a God, and what reason is there for supposing him to conform to the claims of Christian doctrine? In this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  17. Vuko Andric & Attila Tanyi (2015). God and Eternal Boredom. Religious Studies:1-20.
    God is thought to be eternal. Does this mean that he is timeless? Or is he, rather, omnitemporal? In this paper we want to show that God (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2013). Postmodern Apologetics?: Arguments for God in Contemporary Philosophy. Fordham University Press.
    This book provides an introduction to the emerging field of Continental philosophy of religion by treating the philosophical thought of its most important representatives, including its appropriations (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  19.  59
    John Foster (2004). The Divine Lawmaker: Lectures on Induction, Laws of Nature, and the Existence of God. Oxford University Press.
    John Foster presents a clear and powerful discussion of a range of topics relating to our understanding of the universe: induction, laws of nature, and the existence (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  20.  90
    David Torrijos-Castrillejo (2015). Feuerbach, Xenophanes and the Too Human God. In Gabriela Blebea Nicolae (ed.), Credința în época secularizării. Editura Arhiepiscopiei Romano-Catolice. pp. 179-192.
    Feuerbach is known for his unmasking of the concept of God insofar he solved it in a celestial idealization of the human essence. Xenophanes already rejected the (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  51
    Brian Davies (2011). Thomas Aquinas on God and Evil. Oxford University Press.
    The problem of evil -- Aquinas, philosophy, and theology -- What there is -- Goodness and badness -- God the creator -- God's perfection and goodness -- The creator and (...)evil -- Providence and grace -- The trinity and Christ -- Aquinas on god and evil. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  22. Gabriel Vacariu, (2015) "God Cannot Even Exist!".
    We have to change our oldest paradigm of thinking about the existence of theworldand God. In my books and articles, I have showed that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  11
    Nicholas Everitt (2003). The Non-Existence of God. Routledge London.
    Is it possible to prove or disprove God's existence? Arguments for the existence of God have taken many different forms over the centuries: in The Non-Existence (...) of God, Nicholas Everitt considers all of the arguments and examines the role that reason and knowledge play in the debate over God's existence. He draws on recent scientific disputes over neo-Darwinism, the implication of 'big bang' cosmology, and the temporal and spatial size of the universe; and discusses some of the most recent work on the subject, leading to a controversial conclusion. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  24.  62
    Graham Robert Oppy (1995). Ontological Arguments and Belief in God. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a unique contribution to the philosophy of religion. It offers a comprehensive discussion of one of the most famous arguments for the existence of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  25. Paul Gould (2012). The Problem of Universals, Realism, and God. Metaphysica 13 (2):183-194.
    There has been much discussion of late on what exactly the Problem of Universals is and is not. Of course answers to these questions and many more (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Courtney Fugate (2014). The Highest Good and Kant's Proof(s) of God's Existence. History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (2).
    This paper explains a way of understanding Kant's proof of God's existence in the Critique of Practical Reason that has hitherto gone unnoticed and argues that (...) this interpretation possesses several advantages over its rivals. By first looking at examples where Kant indicates the role that faith plays in moral life and then reconstructing the proof of the second Critique with this in view, I argue that, for Kant, we must adopt a certain conception of the highest good, and so also must choose to believe in the kind of God that can make it possible, because this is essentially a way of actively striving for virtue. One advantage of this interpretation, I argue, is that it is able to make sense of the strong link Kant draws between morality and religion. (shrink)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Robert K. Garcia (2013). Is God's Benevolence Impartial? Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):23-30.
    In this paper I consider the intuitive idea that God is fair and does not play favorites. This belief appears to be held by many theists. I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Andrew Chignell & Dean Zimmerman (2012). Review: Saving God From Saving God. [REVIEW] Books and Culture 15 (3).
    Mark Johnstons book, Saving God (Princeton University Press, 2010) has two main goals, one negative and the other positive: (1) to eliminate the gods of the (...)major Western monotheisms (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) as candidates for the role ofthe Highest One”; (2) to introduce the real Highest One, a panentheistic deity worthy of devotion and capable of extending to us the grace needed to transform us from inwardly-turned sinners to practitioners of agape. In this review, we argue that Johnstons attack on traditional forms of monotheism has less force than his criticism of theundergraduate atheists” (e.g., Hitchens, Harris, Dawkins); and that his candidate for Highest One is not the greatest possible being, and so could not play the role Johnston casts for it. -/- . (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  9
    Vacariu Gabriel, (2015) God Cannot Even Exist.
    We have to change our oldest paradigm of thinking about the existence of theworldand God. In our books and articles, we have showed that the (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  41
    Robert J. Spitzer (2010). New Proofs for the Existence of God: Contributions of Contemporary Physics and Philosophy. William B. Eerdmans.
    New Proofs for the Existence of God responds to these glaring omissions. / From universal space-time asymmetry to cosmic coincidences to the intelligibility of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  31. Brooke Alan Trisel (2012). God's Silence as an Epistemological Concern. Philosophical Forum 43 (4):383-393.
    Throughout history, many people, including Mother Teresa, have been troubled by Gods silence. In spite of the conflicting interpretations of the Bible, God has remained silent. (...)What are the implications of divine hiddenness/silence for a meaning of life? Is there a good reason that explains Gods silence? If God created humanity to fulfill a purpose, then God would have clarified his purpose and our role by now, as I will argue. To help God carry out his purpose, we would need to have a clear understanding of our role. Thus, by failing to clarify our role, God would be undermining himself in achieving the purpose he conceived, which would not make sense. Because God, if he exists, would not engage in this self-defeating behavior, this suggests that humanity was not created by God to fulfill a purpose. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Robert K. Garcia (forthcoming). Tropes as Divine Acts: the Nature of Creaturely Properties in a World Sustained by God. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    I aim to synthesize two issues within theistic metaphysics. The first concerns the metaphysics of creaturely properties and, more specifically, the nature of unshareable properties, or tropes. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Henk van den Belt (2009). Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 3 (3):257-268.
    The emergent new science of synthetic biology is challenging entrenched distinctions between, amongst others, life and non-life, the natural and the artificial, the evolved and the (...)designed, and even the material and the informational. Whenever such culturally sanctioned boundaries are breached, researchers are inevitably accused of playing God or treading in Frankensteins footsteps. Bioethicists, theologians and editors of scientific journals feel obliged to provide an authoritative answer to the ambiguous question of themeaningof life, both as a scientific definition and as an explication with wider existential connotations. This article analyses the arguments mooted in the emerging societal debates on synthetic biology and the way its practitioners respond to criticism, mostly by assuming a defiant posture or professing humility. It explores the relationship between theplaying Godtheme and the Frankenstein motif and examines the doctrinal status of theplaying Godargument. One particularly interesting finding is that liberal theologians generally deny the religious character of theplaying Godargumenta response which fits in with the curious fact that this argument is used mainly by secular organizations. Synthetic biology, it is therefore maintained, does not offend so much the God of the Bible as a deified Nature. While syntheses of artificial life forms cause some vague uneasiness that life may lose its special meaning, most concerns turn out to be narrowly anthropocentric. As long as synthetic biology creates only new microbial life and does not directly affect human life, it will in all likelihood be considered acceptable. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  34. Karen Armstrong (1993). A History of God: The 4000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Gramercy Books.
    Over 700,000 copies of the original hardcover and paperback editions of this stunningly popular book have been sold. Karen Armstrong's superbly readable exploration of how the (...) three dominant monotheistic religions of the worldJudaism, Christianity, and Islamhave shaped and altered the conception of God is a tour de force. One of Britain's foremost commentators on religious affairs, Armstrong traces the history of how men and women have perceived and experienced God, from the time of Abraham to the present. From classical philosophy and medieval mysticism to the Reformation, the Enlightenment, and the modern age of skepticism, Armstrong performs the near miracle of distilling the intellectual history of monotheism into one compelling volume. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  35.  28
    G. R. McLean (2015). Antipathy to God. Sophia 54 (1):13-24.
    Antipathy towards the possibility that God exists is a common attitude, which has recently been clearly expressed by Thomas Nagel. This attitude is presumably irrelevant to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36. Benedikt Paul Göcke (2013). An Analytic Theologian's Stance on the Existence of God. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (2).
    The existence of God is once again the focus of vivid philosophical discussion. From the point of view of analytic theology, however, people often talk past each (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37.  62
    Richard M. Gale (1991). On the Nature and Existence of God. Cambridge University Press.
    There has been in recent years a plethora of defenses of theism from analytical philosophers such as Plantinga, Swinburne, and Alston. Richard Gale's important book is (...)a critical response to these writings. New versions of cosmological, ontological, and religious experience arguments are critically evaluated, along with pragmatic arguments to justify faith on the grounds of its prudential or moral benefits. A special feature of the book is the discussion of the atheological argument that attempts to deduce a contradiction from the theist's way of conceiving of God's nature. In considering arguments for and against the existence of God, Gale is able to clarify many important philosophical concepts including exploration, time, free will, personhood, actuality, and the objectivity of experience. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  38.  46
    Aku Visala (2014). Imago Dei, Dualism, and Evolution: A Philosophical Defense of the Structural Image of God. Zygon 49 (1):101-120.
    Most contemporary theologians have distanced themselves from views that identify the image of God with a capacity or a set of capacities that humans have. This article (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  39.  36
    Nancy Ellen Abrams (2015). A God That Could Be Real in the New Scientific Universe. Zygon 50 (2):376-388.
    We are living at the dawn of the first truly scientific picture of the universe-as-a-whole, yet people are still dragging along prescientific ideas about God (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  55
    Dani Adams (forthcoming). God and Dispositional Essentialism: An Account of the Laws of Nature. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    It is common to appeal to governing laws of nature in order to explain the existence of natural regularities. Classical theism, however, maintains the sovereignty thesis: everything (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  94
    Robert Oakes (2008). Life, Death, and the Hiddenness of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):155 - 160.
    Many philosophers have contended that (traditional) theism or supernaturalism suffers from what can properly be called the Problem of Divine Hiddenness (the PDH ). [See Howard-Snyder and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  42. Yitzhak Melamed (2014). Hasdai Crescas and Spinoza on Actual Infinity and the Infinity of Gods Attributes. In Steven Nadler (ed.), Spinoza and Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 204-215.
    The seventeenth century was an important period in the conceptual development of the notion of the infinite. In 1643, Evangelista Torricelli (1608-1647)—Galileos successor in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Stewart Duncan (2005). Knowledge of God in Leviathan. History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (1):31-48.
    Hobbes denies in Leviathan that we have an idea of God. He does think, though, that God exists, and does not even deny that we can think (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  3
    Denys Turner (2004). Faith, Reason, and the Existence of God. Cambridge University Press.
    Denys Turner argues that there are reasons of faith why the existence of God should be thought rationally demonstrable and that it is worthwhile revisiting the theology (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45.  54
    Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, (...)and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists use to reach theories about everything from DNA to the Big Bang be used to argue for the existence of God? In Is There a God? Swinburne presents a powerful and approachable case for the existence of God. Using the methods of scientific reasoning, Swinburne rigorously argues that science, far from replacing God, provides good grounds for belief in God. With each new discovery and advance, from black holes to quarks, superstrings to continuing evolution, science brings us closer to a complete understanding of how things work--but science can only go so far. Though it can explain much of how the universe works, science doesn't tell us why there is a universe at all. We can understand much of how life evolved, but why is there any life on earth? We can name and explicate scientific laws, but how is it that they operate in the universe? The Darwinian theory holds that the complex animal and human bodies that are here today exist because, ages ago, there were certain chemicals on earth, and given the laws of evolution, it was probable that complex organisms would emerge. But why those laws rather than any other? Why those chemicals? In Swinburne's view, the ultimate grand unifying theory is possible only by a belief in what he calls theism, acknowledging the existence of God: it was God who brought about the natural laws so that humans and animals would evolve. The watch may have been made, Swinburne asserts in reference to Richard Dawkins, with the aid of some blind screwdrivers (or even a blind watchmaking machine), but they were guided by a watchmaker with some very clear sight. At the heart of his argument is Swinburne's belief that the very success of science in showing us how deeply ordered the natural world is provides strong grounds for believing there is an even deeper cause of that order. By embracing a belief in God that acknowledges the truth in science, Swinburne's elegant argument supplies an essential spiritual element to our understanding of order and beauty, the structure beneath the chaos of the natural world. This informed and provocative volume will be essential reading for all readers of popular science, philosophy, and religion. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  46.  39
    Robert K. Garcia & Nathan L. King (eds.) (2009). Is Goodness Without God Good Enough? Rowman & Littlefield.
    Morality and religion: intimately wed, violently opposed, or something else? Discussion of this issue appears in pop culture, the academy, and the mediaoften generating radically opposed (...)views. At one end of the spectrum are those who think that unless God exists, ethics is unfounded and the moral life is unmotivated. At the other end are those who think that religious belief is unnecessary forand even a threat toethical knowledge and the moral life. -/- This volume provides an accessible, charitable discussion that represents a range of views along this spectrum. The book begins with a lively debate between Paul Kurtz and William Lane Craig on the question, Is goodness without God good enough? Kurtz defends the affirmative position and Craig the negative. Following the debate are new essays by prominent scholars. These essays comment on the debate and advance the broader discussion of religion and morality. The book closes with final responses from Kurtz and Craig. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  47.  10
    Andrew Shtulman & Marjaana Lindeman (2016). Attributes of God: Conceptual Foundations of a Foundational Belief. Cognitive Science 40 (3):635-670.
    Anthropomorphism, or the attribution of human properties to nonhuman entities, is often posited as an explanation for the origin and nature of God concepts, but it remains (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48. Richard Oxenberg (2015). My Understanding of the Biblical God: A Brief 'Transreligious' Reflection. Interreligious Insight.
    In this brief paper I reflect upon the Bible's portrayal of God as pointing beyond itself toward a notion of divinity many religions can embrace, but (...)one only imperfectly expressed in the biblical portrait itself. I argue that a fuller recognition of the *fallibility* of the biblical portrait can lead us to a deeper and more satisfying appreciation of the Bible itself. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  25
    Marek Pepliński (2016). Dobroć (Boga - Goodness of God). In Janusz Salamon (ed.), Przewodnik po filozofii religii. Nurt analityczny, Kraków 2016. Wydawnictwo WAM. pp. 121-40.
    The paper presents some historical (Plato, Aristotle, Plotin, Augustine, Boethius, Aquinas) and main contemporary topics about different accounts of goodness of God understood as ontological goodness, perfection (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  66
    Stephen Maitzen (2007). Skeptical Theism and God's Commands. Sophia 46 (3):237-243.
    According to Michael Almeida and Graham Oppy, adherents of skeptical theism will find their sense of moral obligation undermined in a potentiallyappallingway. Michael Bergmann and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000