Results for 'God’s knowledge'

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  1.  28
    Does God Know the Occurrence of a Change Among Particulars? Avicenna and the Problem of God’s Knowledge of Change.Amirhossein Zadyousefi - forthcoming - Dialogue:1-32.
    (i) God is omniscient; therefore, for any change, C, among particulars, God knows the occurrence of C. (ii) If God knows the occurrence of C, then X. (iii) not-X. It is clear that the set of propositions (i)—(iii) is inconsistent. This is the general form of two problems—which I call the ‘problem of change in knowledge’ (PCK) and the ‘problem of change in essence’ (PCE)—for Avicenna concerning God’s knowledge of particulars. No work in the secondary literature has (...)
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  2.  45
    Peter Lombard on God’s Knowledge: Sententiae, Book I, Distinctions 35-38, as the Basis for Later Theological Discussions.Rostislav Tkachenko - 2017 - Sententiae 36 (1):17-30.
    Since the mid-90’s the figure of Peter Lombard and his Book of Sentences has regained the importance in scholarly world and been studied from both historical-theological and historical-philosophical perspectives. But some aspects of his thinking, encapsulated in the written form, which was to become the material basis for the thirteenth- through the fifteenth-century theological projects, remained somewhat insufficiently researched. Therefore this article analyzes the select parts of the Book of Sentences with the purpose of looking at how Peter Lombard handled (...)
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  3.  32
    Peter Lombard on God’s Knowledge and Its Capacities: Sententiae, Book I, Distinctions 38-39.Rostislav Tkachenko - 2018 - Sententiae 37 (1):6-18.
    The global Peter Lombard research reinaugurated in 1990s has resulted in a number of recent publications, but the Master of the Sentences’ theology proper is partially underresearched. In particular, a more detailed exposition of the distinctions 35-41 of his Book of Sentences is needed in order to clarify his doctrine of God’s knowledge and its relation to the human free will. The article builds on the earlier established evidence that, for Peter Lombard in distinctions 35-38, God’s (...), in general, is not causative, although some causative power has to be ascribed to God’s knowledge of the good. The last part of distinction 38 and the content of distinction 39 further analyze the capacities and functionalities of the divine omniscience and explain how it interacts with acts of human will. The key question here deals with the problem of alternative states of affairs: whether something may be otherwise than God foreknew. As it is shown, Master Peter agrees that it is possible for created things and events to be otherwise than they are, but insists that God’s knowledge must be in any case exhaustive and infallible. He uses a number of logical tools to defend the thesis about God’s perfect knowledge and the possibility of things happening otherwise, but lacks a strict definition of the notion of “possibility” used here. The study concludes that in few cases Lombard’s posse could mean a potency or a simple logical possibility, or the diachronic contingency, but the overall theological statement is clear: potentially, God’s knowledge can be different or include alternative state of affairs but it cannot change. (shrink)
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  4. "Utilité de la théologie naturelle pour la connaissance de Dieu aujourd’hui" [Usefulness of Natural Theology for God's Knowledge Today].Philippe Gagnon - 2017 - Connaître : Cahiers de l'Association Foi Et Culture Scientifique (48):83-92.
    In this public debate with Philippe Deterre (research director in immunology at the CNRS) – held at l'Enclos Rey in Paris' 15th district during the biennial Conference of the Réseau Blaise Pascal in March 2017 –, I defended the usefulness of natural theology. I first clarify theology's nature and understanding, then I speak about a tradition that upheld the public and exterior knowledge of God, and make an effort to show the presence of a theme reminiscent of natural theology (...)
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  5. Harmonizing Faith and Knowledge of God’s Existence in St. Thomas.Daniel De Haan - 2015 - In Harm Goris, L. Hendriks & H. J. M. Schoot (eds.), Faith, Hope and Love. Thomas Aquinas on Living by the Theological Virtues. Peeters. pp. 137-160.
    Is it necessary for all Christians – including Christians who are metaphysicians with demonstrative knowledge of God’s existence – to hold by faith that God exists? I shall approach this apparently straightforward question by investigating two opposing lines of interpretation of Thomas Aquinas’s own response to this question. I shall begin with two texts from Thomas that motivate two incompatible theses concerning Thomas’s doctrine of the harmony of faith and reason with respect to the existence of God. Next, (...)
     
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  6.  27
    Knowledge and the Transcendent: An Inquiry Into the Mind's Relationship to God.Paul A. Macdonald Jr - 2009 - Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press.
    There has been a distinct trend in modern thought to be deeply suspicious and critical of the human mind's ability to gain genuine access to any reality that transcends the world or the mind. As such, much modern reflection on the mind's relationship to a transcendent God has either banished God from the realm of the cognitively accessible or found ways to evacuate God of his transcendence, and reduce God to a concept or idea in the mind. In this book, (...)
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  7.  65
    God’s Decrees and Middle Knowledge: Leibniz and the Jesuits.Jean-Pascal Anfray - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):647-670.
    During the seventeenth century, disputes over middle knowledge centered on the following question: does God know contingent states of affairs before He decrees to bring them about ; or, conversely, does He know them after He has decreed which states of affairs He will bring about? This article intends to cast some light on Leibniz’s view of this question. Of central importance here is the notion of a possible decree. Despite his apparent proximity to the Dominican view, Leibniz maintained (...)
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  8. Leibniz on God’s Knowledge of Counterfactuals.Michael V. Griffin - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (3):317-343.
    In the eleventh chapter of Matthew’s Gospel, Jesus says to the inhabitants of Bethsaida and Corozain: “If the miracles worked in you had taken place in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes”. Passages like this support a scriptural argument for God’s knowledge of counterfactuals about created individuals. In the sixteenth century, Jesuits and Dominicans vigorously debated about how to explain this knowledge. The Jesuits, notably Luis de Molina and Francisco Suarez, (...)
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  9.  94
    Agent-Causation and Paradigms for God’s Knowledge.Christina Schneider - 2013 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (1):35--54.
    The article aims at formulating a philosophical framework and by this giving some means at hand to save human libertarian freedom, God’s omniscience and God’s ”eternity’. This threefold aim is achieved by 1) conceiving of an agent as having different possibilities to act, 2) regarding God’s knowledge -- with respect to agents -- not only as being ”propositional’ in character but also as being ”experiential’: God knows an agent also from the ”first person perspective’, as the (...)
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  10.  54
    John Duns Scotus on God's Knowledge of Sins: A Test-Case for God's Knowledge of Contingents.Gloria Frost - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 15-34.
    This paper discusses Scotus’s view of how God knows sins by analyzing texts from his discussions of God’s permission of sin and predestination. I show that Scotus departed from his standard theory of how God knows contingents when explaining how God knows sins. God cannot know sins by knowing a first-order act of his will, as he knows other contingents according to Scotus, since God does not directly will sins. I suggest that Scotus’s recognition that his standard theory of (...)
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  11.  50
    On Grounding God's Knowledge of the Probable.Jennifer Jensen - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (1):65-83.
    A common objection to the Molinist account of divine providence states that counterfactuals of creaturely freedom lack grounds. Some Molinists appeal to brute counterfactual facts about the subject of the CCF in order to ground CCFs. Others argue that CCFs are grounded by the subject's actions in nearby worlds. In this article, I argue that Open Theism's account of divine providence employs would-probably conditionals that are most plausibly grounded by either brute facts about the subject of these conditionals or non-actual (...)
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  12.  39
    'The Mind as an Object of God's Knowledge': Another Cartesian Temptation?Sophia Vasalou - 2009 - Philosophical Investigations 32 (1):44-64.
    In this paper my aim is to consider the picture of God's immediate knowledge of the mind as this appears in Wittgenstein's work, where its soundness seems to be brought into question. My argument is that the response to this denial should take the form, not of an investigation of a theological position concerning God's knowledge ("can God look into the human mind?"), but of a negotiation of the difficulties affecting our use of this picture. A great part (...)
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  13. God’s Knowledge of Other Minds.Dan O’Brien - 2013 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (1):17--34.
    This paper explores one aspect of God’s omniscience, that is, his knowledge of human minds. In §1 I spell out a traditional notion of divine knowledge, and in §2 I argue that our understanding of the thoughts of others is a distinct kind of knowledge from that involved in knowledge of the physical world; it involves empathizing with thinkers. In §3 I show how this is relevant to the question of how, and whether, God understands (...)
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  14.  14
    The Relationship Between God's Knowledge and Will in the Al-Ghazālian Theology: A Critical Approach.Hasan Akkanat - 2018 - Entelekya Logico-Metaphysical Review 2 (2):99-112.
    Three divine attributes discussed in the classical ages of Islamic theology were established as a doctrine in time, and the other doctrines of divine attributes were removed from the Sunnī theology. Divine knowledge is an attribute whose activity is generally to know all possible options about the universe, while the divine will is another attribute whose activity is to choose only one of the similar or dissimilar options. But they are seen incompatible when considered in the frame of (...) relationship to the universe: if it is obviously known which option will happen, it is not really chosen at the moment of choice, and if it is uncertain which option will be chosen, it cannot be known which option will happen until preference. What is problematic here is that you attempt to design the divine attributes and actions according to two-valued logic: His all activities must happen one after another. Then, which solution is proposed for the issue by al-Ghazālī, who claims that knowledge and the will are the mutually compatible and complementary attributes for God’s relationship to the universe? I discuss whether al-Ghazālī supports his claim with adequate arguments or not. (shrink)
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  15.  55
    God’s Knowledge of Particulars.Kevjn Lim - 2009 - Journal of Islamic Philosophy 5:75-98.
    This article offers a comparative study of three thinkers from almost as many intellectual and cultural traditions: Avicenna, Maimonides, and Gersonides, and discusses the extent of the knowledge of particulars which each one ascribed to God. Avicenna de-reified Aristotle’s abstract and isolated Prime Mover and argued that God can know particulars but limited these to universals. Maimonides disanalogized divine from human knowledge, arguing that the epistemic mode predicated of mankind cannot be equally predicated of God, and that God (...)
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  16.  2
    Does God Know That the Flower in My Hand Is Red? Avicenna and the Problem of God’s Perceptual Knowledge.Amirhossein Zadyousefi - forthcoming - Sophia:1-37.
    God is omniscient; therefore, He knows that ‘the flower in my hand is red.’ If God knows that ‘the flower in my hand is red,’ then He knows it perceptually. God does not know anything perceptually. It is clear that the set of propositions – form an inconsistent triad. This is one of four problems with which Avicenna was engaged concerning God's knowledge of particulars, which I call the problem of perceptual knowledge. In order to solve PPK and (...)
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  17.  5
    Does God Know That the Flower in My Hand Is Red? Avicenna and the Problem of God’s Perceptual Knowledge.Amirhossein Zadyousefi - forthcoming - Sophia:1-37.
    God is omniscient; therefore, He knows that ‘the flower in my hand is red.’ If God knows that ‘the flower in my hand is red,’ then He knows it perceptually. God does not know anything perceptually. It is clear that the set of propositions – form an inconsistent triad. This is one of four problems with which Avicenna was engaged concerning God's knowledge of particulars, which I call the problem of perceptual knowledge. In order to solve PPK and (...)
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  18.  95
    Gersonides and Spinoza on God’s Knowledge of Universals and Particulars.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Gad Freudenthal, David Wirmer & Ofer Elior (eds.), Gersonides Through the Ages.
  19.  12
    God's Willing Knowledge, Redux.Douglas Langston - 2010 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (2):235-282.
    God’s Willing Knowledge argued that Scotus should be seen as offering a non-libertarian view of freedom. Some critics of this interpretation point to Scotus’s texts that offer a synchronic view of possibility, which is seen as necessarily implying a libertarian view. Other critics point to the debt that Scotus owes to his libertarian predecessors and argue that Scotus follows their view. In order to address these critics, in the first section of the paper, some of the thinkers Scotus (...)
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  20.  7
    The Knowledge of God’s Quid Sit in Dominican Theology.Igor Agostini - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (2):191-210.
    In this article I argue that although the prevailing interpretation within the Thomistic contemporary critical literature, claiming the inaccessibility of God’s quid sit, is faithful both to Saint Thomas and to John Capreolus’s account of Aquinas’s doctrine, it is far from being uncontroversial in the first steps of the history of Thomism. A central step in this history is marked by the Parisian Condemnation of 1277, which is at the origin of relevant debate within the Dominican Order on the (...)
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  21.  45
    God's Justified Knowledge and the Hard-Soft Fact Distinction.John R. Shook - 2006 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 8:69-73.
    The distinction between hard and soft facts has been used by compatibilists to argue that God's divine foreknowledge is not incompatible with human free will. The debate over this distinction has ignored the question of the justification of divine knowledge. I argue that the distinction between hard and soft facts is illusory because the existence of soft facts presupposes that justification exists. Moreover, if the hard fact /soft fact distinction collapses, then God justifiably knows all future events, and human (...)
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  22.  28
    God’s Divinely Justified Knowledge is Incompatible with Human Free Will.John Shook - 2010 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 15 (1):141-159.
    A new version of the incompatibilist argument is developed. Knowledge is justified true belief. If God’s divine knowledge must be justified knowledge, then humans cannot have the “alternative possibilities” type of free will. This incompatibilist argument is immunized against the application of the hard-soft fact distinction. If divine knowledge is justified, then the only kind of facts that God can know are hard facts, permitting this incompatibilist argument to succeed.
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  23.  7
    God's Justified Knowledge and the Hard-Soft Fact Distinction.John R. Shook - 2006 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 8:69-73.
    The distinction between hard and soft facts has been used by compatibilists to argue that God's divine foreknowledge is not incompatible with human free will. The debate over this distinction has ignored the question of the justification of divine knowledge. I argue that the distinction between hard and soft facts is illusory because the existence of soft facts presupposes that justification exists. Moreover, if the hard fact /soft fact distinction collapses, then God justifiably knows all future events, and human (...)
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  24.  48
    Delusions of Knowledge Concerning God's Existence.Keith DeRose - 2018 - In Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne & Dani Rabinowitz (eds.), Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 288-301.
  25.  48
    Calvin’s “Sense of Divinity” and Externalist Knowledge of God.David Reiter - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15 (3):253-270.
    In this paper I explore and defend an interpretation of Calvin’s doctrine of the sense of divinity which implies the following claim: All sane cognizers know that God exists. I argue that externalism about knowledge comports well with claim CSD, and I explore various questions about the character of the theistic belief implied by CSD. For example, I argue that CSD implies that all sane cognizers possess functionally rational theistic belief. In the final sections of the paper, I respond (...)
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  26. Berkeley on God's Knowledge of Pain.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 136-145.
    Since nothing about God is passive, and the perception of pain is inherently passive, then it seems that God does not know what it is like to experience pain. Nor would he be able to cause us to experience pain, for his experience would then be a sensation (which would require God to have senses, which he does not). My suggestion is that Berkeley avoids this situation by describing how God knows about pain “among other things” (i.e. as something whose (...)
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  27. Skeptheism: Is Knowledge of God’s Existence Possible?Moti Mizrahi - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (1):41-64.
    In this paper, I sketch an argument for the view that we cannot know (or have good reasons to believe) that God exists. Some call this view “strong agnosticism” but I prefer the term “skeptheism” in order to clearly distinguish between two distinct epistemic attitudes with respect to the existence of God, namely, agnosticism and skepticism. For the skeptheist, we cannot know (or have good reasons to believe) that God exists, since there can be neither conceptual (a priori) nor empirical (...)
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  28.  26
    Insects – a Mistake in God's Creation? Tharu Farmers' Perception and Knowledge of Insects: A Case Study of Gobardiha Village Development Committee, Dang-Deukhuri, Nepal.Astrid Björnsen Gurung - 2003 - Agriculture and Human Values 20 (4):337-370.
    Recent trends in agriculturalresearch and development emphasize the need forfarmer participation. Participation not onlymeans farmers' physical presence but also theuse of their knowledge and expertise.Understanding potentials and drawbacks of theirlocal knowledge system is a prerequisite forconstructive collaboration between farmers,scientists, and extension services.An ethnoentomological study, conducted in aTharu village in Nepal, documents farmers'qualitative and quantitative knowledge as wellas perceptions of insects and pest management,insect nomenclature and classification, andissues related to insect recognition and localbeliefs. The study offers a basis (...)
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  29.  83
    God's Knowledge and Ours: Kant and Mou Zongsan on Intellectual Intuition.Nicholas Bunnin - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):613-624.
    This article examines Mou Zongsan's claim that “if it is true that human beings cannot have intellectual intuition, then the whole of Chinese philosophy must collapse completely, and the thousands years of effort must be in vain. It is just an illusion.” I argue that Mou's commitment to establishing and justifying a “moral metaphysics” was his main motivation for rejecting Kant's denial of the possibility of humans having intellectual intuition. I consider the implications of Mou's response to Kant for the (...)
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  30. The Christian's Knowledge of God.Walter Williamson Bryden - 1940 - Toronto, the Thorn Press.
     
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  31. Man's Knowledge of God.William J. Wolf - 1955 - Garden City, New York, Doubleday.
  32.  80
    Eternity and God’s Knowledge: A Reply to Shanley.Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann - 1998 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 72 (3):439-445.
  33.  22
    Some Aspects of Avicenna's Theory of God's Knowledge of Particulars.Michael E. Marmura - 1962 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 82 (3):299-312.
  34.  45
    Aquinas and God’s Knowledge of the Creature.W. L. Lacy - 1964 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):43-48.
  35.  27
    Untying the Knot: Leibniz on God's Knowledge of Future Free Contingents.Jack D. Davidson - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (1):89 - 116.
  36. God's Knowledge'.E. Stump & N. Kretzmann - 1996 - In Thomas D. Senor (ed.), The Rationality of Belief and the Plurality of Faith. Cornell University Press. pp. 94--124.
  37.  34
    Gersonides' Account of God's Knowledge of Particulars.Norbert Max Samuelson - 1972 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (4):399-416.
  38.  20
    God's Knowledge and Ours: Kant and Mou Zongsan on Intellectual Intuition.Nicholas Bunnin - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):47-58.
  39.  15
    The Wars of the Lord, Treatise Three: On God's Knowledge. Gersonides, Norbert Max Samuelson.Morton Bloomfield - 1979 - Speculum 54 (1):136-137.
  40.  28
    Gersonides on God’s Knowledge.Menachem Marc Kellner - 1978 - International Studies in Philosophy 10:225-227.
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  41.  34
    God's Knowledge of the Necessary.Charles J. Kelly - 1986 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):131 - 145.
  42.  7
    Averroes on God's Knowledge of Particulars.C. Belo - 2006 - Journal of Islamic Studies 17 (2):177-199.
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  43.  6
    Aquinas on God's Knowledge of Evil Intentions.Montague Brown - 1995 - New Blackfriars 76 (892):193-202.
  44.  1
    God's Knowledge in Our Frail Mind.Mark F. Johnson - unknown
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  45.  1
    Gersonides on God’s Knowledge[REVIEW]Menachem Marc Kellner - 1978 - International Studies in Philosophy 10:225-227.
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  46. God's Knowledge and Will.James Brent - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
  47. God's Knowledge of Future Contingents: A Reply to William Lane Craig.David Burrell - 1994 - The Thomist 58:317-322.
     
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  48. Aquinas on God's Knowledge of Future Contingents.William Lane Craig - 1990 - The Thomist 54 (1):33-79.
     
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  49. God's Knowledge of Future Contingent Singulars: A Reply.Tj Kondoleon - 1992 - The Thomist 56 (1):117-139.
     
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  50. The Problem of God's Knowledge in Gersonides: A Translation of and Commentary to Book Three of the 'Milhamot Adonai.'.Norbert Max Samuelson - 1970 - Dissertation, Indiana University
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