41 found
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  1.  55
    Explanation and Understanding.Gordon G. Brittan & George Henrik Von Wright - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy 70 (20):759-765.
  2.  23
    Belief, Evidence, and Uncertainty: Problems of Epistemic Inference.Mark Taper, Gordon Brittan & Prasanta Bandyopadhyay - 2016 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag.
    It can be demonstrated in a very straightforward way that confirmation and evidence as spelled out by us can vary from one case to the next, that is, a hypothesis may be weakly confirmed and yet the evidence for it can be strong, and conversely, the evidence may be weak and the confirmation strong. At first glance, this seems puzzling; the puzzlement disappears once it is understood that confirmation is of single hypotheses, in which there is an initial degree of (...)
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  3.  17
    The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz.Gordon G. Brittan Jr - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (3):432-434.
    I said that the book is brilliant. This is not so much because of the conclusions eventually reached about the inadequacy of a purely naturalistic approach to mind. These conclusions are already familiar in the work of Donald Davidson and others. Rather, it is because of the accumulation of historical detail and insight on the basis of which these conclusions are reached. It is often said, for instance, that Kant is a watershed figure, in some sense synthesizing and then moving (...)
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  4.  2
    Kant’s Theory of Science.Gordon G. Brittan - 1978 - Princeton University Press, C1978.
    While interest in Kant's philosophy has increased in recent years, very little of it has focused on his theory of science. This book gives a general account of that theory, of its motives and implications, and of the way it brought forth a new conception of the nature of philosophical thought. To reconstruct Kant's theory of science, the author identifies unifying themes of his philosophy of mathematics and philosophy of physics, both undergirded by his distinctive logical doctrines, and shows how (...)
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  5.  92
    Acceptibility, Evidence, and Severity.Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay & Gordon G. Brittan - 2006 - Synthese 148 (2):259-293.
    The notion of a severe test has played an important methodological role in the history of science. But it has not until recently been analyzed in any detail. We develop a generally Bayesian analysis of the notion, compare it with Deborah Mayo’s error-statistical approach by way of sample diagnostic tests in the medical sciences, and consider various objections to both. At the core of our analysis is a distinction between evidence and confirmation or belief. These notions must be kept separate (...)
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  6.  85
    Two Dogmas of Strong Objective Bayesianism.Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay & Gordon Brittan - 2010 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (1):45 – 65.
    We introduce a distinction, unnoticed in the literature, between four varieties of objective Bayesianism. What we call ' strong objective Bayesianism' is characterized by two claims, that all scientific inference is 'logical' and that, given the same background information two agents will ascribe a unique probability to their priors. We think that neither of these claims can be sustained; in this sense, they are 'dogmatic'. The first fails to recognize that some scientific inference, in particular that concerning evidential relations, is (...)
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  7.  55
    Explanation and Reduction.Gordon G. Brittan - 1970 - Journal of Philosophy 67 (13):446-457.
  8.  21
    The Secrets of Antelope.Gordon G. Brittan - 1999 - Erkenntnis 51 (1):59 - 77.
  9.  68
    The Logic of Simpson’s Paradox.Prasanta S. Bandyoapdhyay, Davin Nelson, Mark Greenwood, Gordon Brittan & Jesse Berwald - 2011 - Synthese 181 (2):185 - 208.
    There are three distinct questions associated with Simpson's paradox, (i) Why or in what sense is Simpson's paradox a paradox? (ii) What is the proper analysis of the paradox? (iii) How one should proceed when confronted with a typical case of the paradox? We propose a "formar" answer to the first two questions which, among other things, includes deductive proofs for important theorems regarding Simpson's paradox. Our account contrasts sharply with Pearl's causal (and questionable) account of the first two questions. (...)
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  10.  19
    The Logic of Simpson’s Paradox.Prasanta S. Bandyoapdhyay, Davin Nelson, Mark Greenwood, Gordon Brittan & Jesse Berwald - 2011 - Synthese 181 (2):185-208.
    There are three distinct questions associated with Simpson’s paradox. Why or in what sense is Simpson’s paradox a paradox? What is the proper analysis of the paradox? How one should proceed when confronted with a typical case of the paradox? We propose a “formal” answer to the first two questions which, among other things, includes deductive proofs for important theorems regarding Simpson’s paradox. Our account contrasts sharply with Pearl’s causal account of the first two questions. We argue that the “how (...)
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  11.  17
    Non-Bayesian Accounts of Evidence: Howson’s Counterexample Countered.Gordon Brittan, Mark L. Taper & Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (3):291-298.
    There is a debate in Bayesian confirmation theory between subjective and non-subjective accounts of evidence. Colin Howson has provided a counterexample to our non-subjective account of evidence: the counterexample refers to a case in which there is strong evidence for a hypothesis, but the hypothesis is highly implausible. In this article, we contend that, by supposing that strong evidence for a hypothesis makes the hypothesis more believable, Howson conflates the distinction between confirmation and evidence. We demonstrate that Howson’s counterexample fails (...)
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  12.  62
    Empiricism and/or Instrumentalism?Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay, Mark Greenwood, Gordon Brittan & Ken A. Aho - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S5):1019-1041.
    Elliott Sober is both an empiricist and an instrumentalist. His empiricism rests on a principle called actualism, whereas his instrumentalism violates this. This violation generates a tension in his work. We argue that Sober is committed to a conflicting methodological imperative because of this tension. Our argument illuminates the contemporary debate between realism and empiricism which is increasingly focused on the application of scientific inference to testing scientific theories. Sober’s position illustrates how the principle of actualism drives a wedge between (...)
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  13. Statistical Inference and the Plethora of Probability Paradigms: A Principled Pluralism.Mark L. Taper, Gordon Brittan Jr & Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay - manuscript
    The major competing statistical paradigms share a common remarkable but unremarked thread: in many of their inferential applications, different probability interpretations are combined. How this plays out in different theories of inference depends on the type of question asked. We distinguish four question types: confirmation, evidence, decision, and prediction. We show that Bayesian confirmation theory mixes what are intuitively “subjective” and “objective” interpretations of probability, whereas the likelihood-based account of evidence melds three conceptions of what constitutes an “objective” probability.
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  14.  1
    Non Entis Nulla Sunt Attributa.Gordon G. Brittan - 1974 - In Gerhard Funke (ed.), Akten des 4. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses: Mainz, 6.–10. April 1974, Teil 2: Sektionen 1,2. De Gruyter. pp. 93-100.
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  15. Dieter Henrich, Aesthetic Judgment and the Moral Image of the World. [REVIEW]Gordon Brittan Jr - 1995 - Philosophy in Review 15 (1):44-46.
  16.  37
    The Continuity of Matter.Gordon G. Brittan - 1995 - Proceedings of the Eighth International Kant Congress 1:611-618.
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  17.  34
    Kant's Copernican Revolution, by Ermanno Bencivenga. [REVIEW]Gordon G. Brittan Jr - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (3):740-742.
  18. A Deductive Theory of Space and Time.Gordon G. Brittan - 1971 - Philosophy of Science 38 (4):610-612.
  19.  29
    Graham Bird, The Revolutionary Kant: Introduction.Gordon Brittan - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (2):211-219.
    The interpretation of Kant's Critical philosophy as a version of traditional idealism has a long history. In spite of Kant's and his commentators’ various attempts to distinguish between traditional and transcendental idealism, his philosophy continues to be construed as committed to various features usually associated with the traditional idealist project. As a result, most often, the accusation is that his Critical philosophy makes too strong metaphysical and epistemological claims.In his The Revolutionary Kant, Graham Bird engages in a systematic and thorough (...)
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  20. Causality, Method and Modality.Gordon G. Brittan Jr (ed.) - 1991 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
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  21. Peter Janich, Protophysis of Time. [REVIEW]Gordon Brittan Jr - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7:154-156.
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  22. Systématicité et objectivité.Gordon G. Brittan - 2000 - Archives de Philosophie 63 (4):583-594.
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  23. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science [by] Karel Lambert [and] Gordon G. Brittan. --.Karel Lambert & Gordon G. Brittan - 1970 - Prentice-Hall.
  24.  51
    Wind, Energy, Landscape: Reconciling Nature and Technology.Gordon G. Brittan Jr - 2001 - Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):169 – 184.
    Despite the fact that they are in most respects environmentally benign, electricity-generating wind turbines frequently encounter a great deal of resistance. Much of this resistance is aesthetic in character; wind turbines somehow do not "fit" in the landscape. On one (classical) view, landscapes are beautiful to the extent that they are "scenic," well-balanced compositions. But wind turbines introduce a discordant note, they are out of "scale." On another (ecological) view, landscapes are beautiful if their various elements form a stable and (...)
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  25.  21
    The Reality of Reference.Gordon G. Brittan - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (S1):37-44.
  26.  13
    Irving I Polonoff, Force, Cosmos, Monads and Other Themes of Kant's Early Thought. [REVIEW]Gordon G. Brittan - 1976 - Philosophical Review 85 (2):253.
  27.  15
    Gottfried Martin., Arithmetic and Combinatorics: Kant and His Contemporaries.Gordon G. Brittan - 1989 - International Studies in Philosophy 21 (1):100-101.
  28.  25
    The Reality of Reference: Comments on Carl Posy's “Where Have All the Objects Gone?”.Gordon G. Brittan - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (S1):37-44.
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  29.  16
    History, Testimony, and Two Kinds of Scepticism.Gordon Brittan - 1994 - In A. Chakrabarti & B. K. Matilal (eds.), Knowing From Words. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 273--295.
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  30.  18
    Kant's Newtonian Revolution in Philosophy.Gordon G. Brittan - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (4):622-624.
  31.  10
    The Reality of Reference: Comments on Carl Posy’s “Where Have All the Objects Gone?”.Gordon G. Brittan - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (S1):37-44.
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  32.  8
    Transcendental Idealism, Empirical Realism, and the Completeness Principle.Gordon G. Brittan Jr - 2001 - In Ralph Schumacher, Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Volker Gerhardt (eds.), Kant Und Die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des Ix. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Bd. I: Hauptvorträge. Bd. Ii: Sektionen I-V. Bd. Iii: Sektionen Vi-X: Bd. Iv: Sektionen Xi-Xiv. Bd. V: Sektionen Xv-Xviii. De Gruyter. pp. 541-548.
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  33.  8
    Measurability, Commonsensibility, and Primary Qualities.Gordon Brittan - 1969 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 47 (1):15-24.
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  34.  14
    The Kantian Foundations of Modern Science.Gordon G. Brittan Jr - 1984 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:706 - 714.
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  35.  12
    Towards a Theory of Theoretical Objects.Gordon G. Brittan Jr - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:384 - 393.
    Traditional accounts stress certain features of theoretical objects such as their alleged imperceptibility, that are taken to raise epistemological difficulties. But these accounts do not show how theoretical objects, rightly understood, either differ in kind from more ordinary sorts of objects or make science possible. I sketch a new account that focuses on the underdetermination and similarity of theoretical objects, features closely connected to the explanatory roles they play, and construes them on an algebraic model.
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  36.  5
    Robert Hahn, "Kant's Newtonian Revolution in Philosophy". [REVIEW]Gordon J. Brittan - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (4):622.
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  37.  32
    Systematicity and Objectivity in the Third Critique.Gordon G. Brittan - 1992 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):167-186.
  38. Peter Janich, Protophysis of Time Reviewed By.Gordon G. Brittan Jr - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7 (4):154-156.
     
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  39.  10
    Systematicity and Objectivity in the Third Critique.Gordon G. Brittan - 1992 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (Supplement):167-186.
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  40.  2
    Kant's Copernican Revolution.Gordon G. Brittan - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (3):740-742.
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  41.  6
    Wind, Energy, Landscape: Reconciling Nature and Technology.Gordon G. Brittan - 2001 - Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):169-184.
    Despite the fact that they are in most respects environmentally benign, electricity-generating wind turbines frequently encounter a great deal of resistance. Much of this resistance is aesthetic in character; wind turbines somehow do not "fit" in the landscape. On one view, landscapes are beautiful to the extent that they are "scenic," well-balanced compositions. But wind turbines introduce a discordant note, they are out of "scale." On another view, landscapes are beautiful if their various elements form a stable and integrated organic (...)
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