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Gordon Hull
University of North Carolina, Charlotte
  1. Contextual Gaps: Privacy Issues on Facebook.Gordon Hull, Heather Richter Lipford & Celine Latulipe - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (4):289-302.
    Social networking sites like Facebook are rapidly gaining in popularity. At the same time, they seem to present significant privacy issues for their users. We analyze two of Facebooks’s more recent features, Applications and News Feed, from the perspective enabled by Helen Nissenbaum’s treatment of privacy as “contextual integrity.” Offline, privacy is mediated by highly granular social contexts. Online contexts, including social networking sites, lack much of this granularity. These contextual gaps are at the root of many of the sites’ (...)
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  2.  14
    Platonism, Spinoza and the History of Deconstruction.Gordon Hull - 2009 - In K. C. Baral & R. Radhakrishnan (eds.), Theory After Derrida: Essays in Critical Praxis. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. pp. 74.
    This paper revisits Derrida’s and Deleuze’s early discussions of “Platonism” in order to challenge the common claim that there is a fundamental divergence in their thought and to challenge one standard narrative about the history of deconstruction. According to that narrative, deconstruction should be understood as the successor to phenomenology. To complicate this story, I read Derrida’s “Plato’s Pharmacy” alongside Deleuze’s discussion of Platonism and simulacra at the end of Logic of Sense. Both discussions present Platonism as the effort to (...)
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  3.  6
    Toward a Critical Theory of Corporate Wellness.Gordon Hull & Frank Pasquale - 2018 - Biosocieties 13 (1):190-212.
    In the U.S., ‘employee wellness’ programs are increasingly attached to employer-provided health insurance. These programs attempt to nudge employees, sometimes quite forcefully, into healthy behaviors such as smoking cessation and exercise routines. Despite being widely promoted as saving on healthcare costs, numerous studies undermine this rationale. After documenting the programs’ failure to deliver a positive return on investment, we analyze them as instead providing an opportunity for employers to exercise increasing control over their employees. Based on human capital theory and (...)
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  4.  99
    Clearing the Rubbish: Locke, the Waste Proviso, and the Moral Justification of Intellectual Property.Gordon Hull - 2009 - Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (1):67-93.
    Defenders of strong Intellectual Property rights or of a nonutilitarian basis for those rights often turn to Locke for support.1 Perhaps because of a general belief that Locke is an advocate of all things proprietary, this move seldom receives careful scrutiny. That is unfortunate for two reasons. First, as I will argue, Locke does not issue a blank check in support of all property regimes, and the application of his reasoning to intellectual property would actually tend to favor a substantially (...)
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  5.  8
    The Politics of Quantified Relationships.Gordon Hull - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2):29-30.
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  6.  25
    Biopolitics Is Not (Primarily) About Life: On Biopolitics, Neoliberalism, and Families.Gordon Hull - 2013 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (3):322-335.
    The emergence of topics such as reprogenetics and genetic testing for hereditary diseases attests to the continued salience of Foucault's analyses of biopolitics. His various discussions pose at least two problems for contemporary appropriation of the work. First, it is unclear what the "life" on which biopolitics operates actually refers to.1 Second, it is unclear how biopolitics relates to the economy, either in the classical form of the family/household (oikos) or in the current form of neoliberalism.2 In what follows, I (...)
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  7.  20
    Coding the Dictatorship of ‘the They:’ A Phenomenological Critique of Digital Rights Management.Gordon Hull - forthcoming - In J. Jeremy Wisnewski Mark Sanders (ed.), Ethics and Phenomenology. Lexington Books.
    This paper uses Heidegger’s discussion of artifacts in Being and Time to motivate a phenomenological critique of Digital Rights Management regimes such as the one that allows DVDs to require one to watch commercials and copyright notices. In the first section, I briefly sketch traditional ethical approaches to intellectual property and indicate the gap that a phenomenological approach can fill. In section 2, following Heidegger’s discussion in Being and Time, I analyze DRM technologies as exemplary of the breakdown of things (...)
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  8.  23
    Capital Sive Natura: Spinoza and the Immanence of Empire.Gordon Hull - 2005 - International Studies in Philosophy 37 (2):15-35.
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  9.  24
    Overblocking Autonomy: The Case of Mandatory Library Filtering Software.Gordon Hull - 2009 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (1):81-100.
    In U.S. v. American Library Association (2003), the Supreme Court upheld the Child Internet Protection Act (CIPA), which mandated that libraries receiving federal funding for public Internet access install content-filtering programs on computers which provide that access. These programs analyze incoming content, and block the receipt of objectionable material, in particular pornography. Thus, patrons at public libraries are protected from unintentionally (or intentionally) accessing objectionable material, and, in the case of minors, from accessing potentially damaging material. At least, that is (...)
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  10.  40
    Successful Failure: What Foucault Can Teach Us About Privacy Self-Management in a World of Facebook and Big Data.Gordon Hull - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (2):89-101.
    The “privacy paradox” refers to the discrepancy between the concern individuals express for their privacy and the apparently low value they actually assign to it when they readily trade personal information for low-value goods online. In this paper, I argue that the privacy paradox masks a more important paradox: the self-management model of privacy embedded in notice-and-consent pages on websites and other, analogous practices can be readily shown to underprotect privacy, even in the economic terms favored by its advocates. The (...)
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  11.  24
    Normative Aspects of a 'Substantive' Precautionary Principle.Gordon Hull - manuscript
    This paper discusses some of the current literature around the precautionary principle in environmental philosophy and law with reference to the possibility of transgenic food in Uganda (GMO bananas specifically). My suggestion is that the distinction between formal and substantive versions of a principle, familiar from legal theory, can be useful in imposing some conceptual clarity on aspects of debates concerning the precautionary principle. In particular, most of the negative critical response to the principle has been to formal versions of (...)
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  12.  53
    Thoughts on the Fetishization of Cyberspeech and the Turn From "Public" to "Private" Law.Gordon Hull - 2003 - Constellations 10 (1):113-134.
    In this paper I critically examine recent developments in intellectual property law. In particular, from a point of view informed primarily by Marx and Foucault, I study (a) the rhetoric surrounding the Metallica lawsuit against Napster; (b) a pair of conflicting trademark cases surrounding the ownership of a word on the Internet; and (c) the software industry's move to win approval for “shrink-wrap” or “click here” licenses. I conclude that these developments indicate a new form of disciplinary power, where people (...)
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  13.  30
    Building Better Citizens.Gordon Hull - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):105-129.
    Hobbes rejects the Aristotelian political animal, a move that enables a malleable psychology in which we are driven by our passions and responses to external objects. Our psychology is accordingly overdetermined by our socio-cultural environment, and managing that environment becomes a central task of the state. A particular problem is what I call the “ontological illusion,” the constitutive human tendency to ontologize products of the imagination. I argue that Hobbes’s strategies for managing the ontological illusion govern part four of Leviathan. (...)
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  14.  28
    Cultural Branding, Geographic Source Indicators and Commodification.Gordon Hull - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (2):125-145.
    One strategy for indigenous producers competing with global capital is to obtain geographic source protection (a form of trademark) for products traditionally associated with a cultural grouping or region. The strategy is controversial, and this article adds an additional reason to be cautious about adopting it. Specifically, consumers increasingly consume brands not for the products they designate but for the affiliation with the brands themselves. Since the benefits of source protection depend upon a consumer's desire to have a product actually (...)
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  15.  41
    Hobbes’s Radical Nominalism.Gordon Hull - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):201-223.
    This paper analyzes Hobbes’s understanding of signification, the process whereby words come to have meaning. Most generally, Hobbes develops and extends the nominalist critique of universals as it is found in Ockham and subsequently carried forward by early moderns such as Descartes. Hobbes’s radicality emerges in comparison with Ockham and Descartes, as, unlike them, Hobbes also reduces the intellectual faculty entirely to imagination. According to Hobbes, we have nothing in which a stabilizing, pre-discursive mental language could inhere. Hobbes thus concludes (...)
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  16.  48
    One View of the Dungeon: Torture and the Ticking Time Bomb Between Governmentality and Sovereignty.Gordon Hull - 2008 - International Studies in Philosophy 40 (2):11-31.
    This paper analyzes "ticking time bomb" scenarios in the discursive legitimation of torture and other coercive interrogation techniques. Judith Butler proposes a Foucauldian framework to suggest that Adminstration policies can be read as the irruption of sovereignty within governmentality. Rereading Foucault, I suggest that the policies could equally be understood as an exercise of governmentality, i.e., the subordination of juridical law to economy. I then propose as a reconciliation of these readings that time bomb scenarios serve rhetorically to make the (...)
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  17.  31
    The Jewish Question Revisited: Marx, Derrida and Ethnic Nationalism.Gordon Hull - 1997 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (2):47-77.
    The question of nationalism as spoken about in contem porary circles is structurally the same as Marx's 'Jewish Question'. Through a reading of Marx's early writings, particularly the 'Jewish Question' essay, guided by Derrida's Specters of Marx and Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities, it is possible to begin to rethink the nationalist question. In this light, nationalism emerges as the byproduct of the reduction of heterogeneous 'people' into a homo geneous 'state'; such 'excessive' voices occupy an ontological space outside of the (...)
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  18.  5
    Equitable Relief as a Relay Between Juridical and Biopower: The Case of School Desegregation.Gordon Hull - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):225-248.
    The present paper looks at the intersection of juridical and biopower in the U.S. Supreme Court’s school desegregation cases. These cases generally deploy “equitable relief” as a relay between the juridicially-specified injury of segregation and the biopolitical mandates of integration, allowing broad-based biopolitical remedies for juridically identified problems. This strategy enabled the Courts to negotiate between these forms of power. The analysis here thus suggests the continued relevance of juridical power, and also the limits of Foucault’s own analysis, which suggested (...)
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  19.  15
    Robert Merges: Justifying Intellectual Property. [REVIEW]Gordon Hull - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):169-177.
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  20.  17
    'Against This Empusa :' Hobbes's Leviathan and the Book of Job.Gordon Hull - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):3 – 29.
    This paper examines Hobbes’s Leviathan with reference to seventeenth-century discussions of Job to determine what Hobbes’s titular reference might be intended to accomplish. I argue that for a seventeenth-century reader, Job stands not just for patience in suffering but also for a warning against the hubris of attempting to reason with God. In this light, the reference suggests a Hobbesian immanent critique of scholasticism for having the arrogance to presume it knows God’s way on earth. This gesture both creates the (...)
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  21.  13
    "Reduced to a Zero-Point": Benjamin's Critique of Kantian Historical Experience.Gordon Hull - 2000 - Philosophical Forum 31 (2):163–186.
    Walter Benjamin’s work shows evidence of a sustained engagement with Kant and neo-Kantianism, particularly his thoughts on history and experience. I read Benjamin’s “Theses” and “Theologico-Political Fragment” against Kant’s “Idea for a Cosmopolitan History” to suggest that actual experience becomes an impossibility in the Kantian system because historical events always outrun the efforts of the Kantian apparatus to contain them. That Kant ignores these excesses indicates the theological basis of his system. Benjamin’s “messianism” can then be read as a thoroughgoing (...)
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  22.  12
    Digital Copyright and the Possibility of Pure Law.Gordon Hull - 2003 - Qui Parle 14:21-47.
    This paper attempts a theoretical discussion of effects on the legal regime of copyright induced by the change from material to digital media. Specifically, a fundamental question remains unanswered: what is the relationship between an object and a copy? A conceptually clear answer to this question has been unnecessary because it has always been possible to provide an ad hoc answer through visual inspection of an object. Authorized mechanical reproductions – authorized copies – look similar to one another, and unauthorized (...)
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  23.  12
    Hobbes and the Making of Modern Political Thought.Gordon Hull - 2009 - Continuum.
    Introduction: The politics of construction -- A genealogical context of modern political thought -- More geometrico -- Nominalism redux -- The state of nature -- Constructing politics -- Conclusion: From erasing nature to producing the multitude.
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  24. Hobbes, Marx, and the Foundations of Modern Political Thought.Gordon Hull - 2000 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    This dissertation is a study of the nature and development of "modern" political thought, typical features of which include the "state of nature" and "social contract." Specifically, I argue that modern thought is constructive, which is to say that thinking is seen as, at least to some extent, generative of its objects. I focus primarily on Hobbes and Marx as liminal thinkers in the development of modern political thought. I begin with a discussion of the nature of construction in modern (...)
     
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  25. Marx's Anomalous Reading of Spinoza.Gordon Hull - 2000 - Interpretation 28 (1):17-31.
    This paper is a study of the young Marx’s reception of Spinoza, centered around the 1841 notebooks Marx kept on Spinoza’s Theologico-Political Treatise. I argue that Marx’s own thought carries remarkable affinities with Spinoza’s. On the one hand, both thinkers are concerned to present questions of interpretation and reading as political questions and as essential to any understanding of human freedom. On the other hand, both thinkers are attempting to disclose theological structures masquerading as philosophy. Marx’s recuperation of Spinoza’s political (...)
     
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