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  1.  83
    The Logic of ADHD: A Brief Review of Fallacious Reasoning.Gordon Tait - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (3):239-254.
  2.  36
    Free Will, Moral Responsibility and ADHD.Gordon Tait - 2007 - In Brie Gertler & Lawrence A. Shapiro (eds.), Arguing About the Mind. Routledge. pp. 352--371.
    One of the oldest problems in philosophy concerns the relationship between free will and moral responsibility. If we adopt the position that we lack free will, in the absolute sense—as have most philosophers who have addressed this issue—how can we truly be held accountable for what we do? This paper will contend that the most significant and interesting challenge to the long-standing status-quo on the matter comes not from philosophy, jurisprudence, or even physics, but rather from psychology. By examining this (...)
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  3.  46
    Are There Any Right or Wrong Answers in Teaching Philosophy?Gordon Tait, Clare O'Farrell, Sarah Davey Chesters, Joanne Brownlee & Rebecca Spooner-Lane - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):367-381.
    This article assesses undergraduate teaching students’ assertion that there are no right and wrong answers in teaching philosophy. When asked questions about their experiences of philosophy in the classroom for primary children, their unanimous declaration that teaching philosophy has ‘no right and wrong answers’ is critically examined across the three sub-disciplinary areas to which they were generally referring, namely, pedagogy, ethics, and epistemology. From a pedagogical point of view, it is argued that some teach­ing approaches may indeed be more effective (...)
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  4.  13
    " Are There Any Right or Wrong Answers in Teaching Philosophy": Ethics, Epistemology, and Philosophy in the Classroom.Gordon Tait, Clare D. O'Farrell, Sarah Davey Chesters, Joanne M. Brownlee, Rebecca S. Spooner-Lane & Elizabeth M. Curtis - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (4).
  5.  7
    The Autopsy Imperative: Medicine, Law, and the Coronial Investigation. [REVIEW]Belinda Carpenter & Gordon Tait - 2010 - Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (3):205-221.
    The central purpose of this paper is to address the tension between legal and medical discourses within the coronial system. Medical expertise, based largely upon internal autopsy, becomes positioned as providing the more important information, rather than the legal model which focuses on evidence gathering at the scene. This paper will examine the aspects of the history, philosophy and consequences of the processes by which the medical model gained its current dominance and will conclude that, while autopsies are necessary, they (...)
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  6.  36
    Making Sense of Mass Education.Gordon Tait - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Provides comprehensive and accessible analysis of the field of mass education, assessing traditional issues and dispelling myths about the classroom.
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  7. Schooling and Society: Myths of Mass Education.Gordon Tait - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    This new book is a wide-ranging, contemporary and accessible analysis of familiar and recurring myths about mass education in the United Kingdom. Looking at a variety of important issues and problems, each chapter begins by dispelling myths and assumptions about the classroom, going beyond class, race and gender, to offer analysis of topics such as discipline, youth cultures, information technology and globalisation. Utilising an interdisciplinary lens, this book offers knowledge from disciplines as diverse as sociology, philosophy, jurisprudence and cultural studies. (...)
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