Results for 'Government intervention'

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  1.  64
    Government Intervention, Perceived Benefit, and Bribery of Firms in Transitional China.Yongqiang Gao - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):175-184.
    This article examines whether (1) government intervention causes bribery (or corruption) as rent-seeking theory suggested; (2) a firm’s perceived benefit partially mediates the relationship between government intervention and its bribing behavior, as rational choice/behavior theory suggested; and (3) other firms’ bribing behavior moderates the relationship between government intervention and a firm’s perceived benefit. Our study shows that government intervention causes bribery/corruption indeed, but it exerts its effect on bribery/corruption through the firm’s perceived (...)
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  2.  48
    Child‐Rearing: On Government Intervention and the Discourse of Experts.Paul Smeyers - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):719-738.
    For Kant, education was understood as the ‘means’ to become human—and that is to say, rational. For Rousseau by contrast, and the many child‐centred educators that followed him, the adult world, far from representing reason, is essentially corrupt and given over to the superficialities of worldly vanity. On this view, the child, as a product of nature, is essentially good and will learn all she needs to know from experience. Both positions have their own problems, but beyond this ‘internal debate’, (...)
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  3.  5
    Government Intervention in Health Care Markets Is Practical, Necessary, and Morally Sound.Len M. Nichols - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):547-557.
    This essay makes the affirmative case for health reform by expounding on three fundamental points: one moral case for expanding access to coverage and care to all is grounded in scriptural concepts of community and mutual obligation which continue to inform the American pursuit of justice; the structure of PPACA springs from an appreciation of and approach to channeling market forces that was developed and proposed by a coalition of moderate and conservative Republican U.S. senators almost 20 years ago; the (...)
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  4.  6
    Changing Cultures? Government Intervention in Higher Education 1987–93.Mary Tasker & David Packham - 1994 - British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (2):150-162.
    This article argues that the academic values associated with intellectual freedom are incommensurable with those of industry which permeate recent related government initiatives associated with enterprise education and quality audit and assessment. It concludes that if industrial values are implanted in universities, they will destroy the academic values on which open intellectual enquiry and the disinterested pursuit of knowledge depend.
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  5.  17
    Government Intervention, Peers’ Giving and Corporate Philanthropy: Evidence From Chinese Private SMEs.Yongqiang Gao & Taïeb Hafsi - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):433-447.
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  6. Freedom is Slavery: Laissez-Faire Capitalism is Government Intervention: Acritique of Kevin Carson's Studies in Mutualist Political Economy.George Reisman - 2006 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (1):47-86.
     
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  7.  20
    Government Intervention in Child Rearing: Governing Infancy.Robert A. Davis - 2010 - Educational Theory 60 (3):285-298.
    In this essay, Robert Davis argues that much of the moral anxiety currently surrounding children in Europe and North America emerges at ages and stages curiously familiar from traditional Western constructions of childhood. The symbolism of infancy has proven enduringly effective over the last two centuries in associating the earliest years of children's lives with a peculiar prestige and aura. Infancy is then vouchsafed within this symbolism as a state in which all of society's hopes and ideals for the young (...)
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  8.  4
    Government Intervention in Health Care Markets is Practical, Necessary, and Morally Sound.Len M. Nichols - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):547-557.
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  9.  18
    Female Circumcision in Nigeria: Is It Not Time for Government Intervention[REVIEW]L. A. Briggs - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (1):14-23.
    This paper examines the attitudes of circumcised women towards female circumcision in a community where the practice is in vogue. Also described are the type of circumcision performed, who usually performs the circumcision and complications. One hundred volunteers across the social strata were interviewed by means of a structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using frequency tables. The study revealed that 62% of respondents favoured the practice as an instrument for the control of female sexuality and maintenance of cultural pride. Circumcision (...)
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  10.  51
    The Free Rider as a Basis for Government Intervention.Ernest C. Pasour Jr - 1981 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 5 (4):453-464.
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  11. Health Care, Human Rights and Government Intervention.Garvan F. Kuskey Cda - 1977 - In Robert Hunt & John Arras (eds.), Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine. Mayfield Pub. Co.. pp. 465.
     
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  12. Mill, John, Stuart on Government Intervention.Oskar Kurer - 1989 - History of Political Thought 10 (3):457-480.
  13.  8
    Government Intervention at the Frontiers of Science: British Dyestuffs and Synthetic Organic Chemicals 1914–39. [REVIEW]L. F. Haber - 1973 - Minerva 11 (1):79-94.
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  14.  3
    Female Circumcision in Nigeria: Is It Not Time for Government Intervention?L. A. Briggs - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (1):14-23.
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  15.  27
    Female Circumcision in Nigeria: Is It Not Time for Government Intervention? A Commentary.Donna Dickenson - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (1):27-30.
    A survey of Nigerian women who have undergone female circumcision (female genital mutilation) revealed a majority in favour of the practice. Are Western feminist bioethicists entitled to condemn it?
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  16.  16
    Commentary. Female Circumcision in Nigeria: Is It Not Time for Government Intervention?Donna Dickenson - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (1):27-30.
    The results of a recent survey of Nigerian women might give pause to opponents of female genital mutilation (FGM). One could well argue that if these Nigerian women themselves favour FGM, then it is ironically paternalistic to oppose it. Should Western feminists actually support FGM if it is what women in the South want? I argue in this commentary that such an argument rests on shaky statistical, psychological, medical, political and philosophical grounds. We should go on opposing female genital mutilation (...)
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  17.  19
    Compelled Compassion - Government Intervention in the Treatment of Critically Ill Newborns.D. W. Vere - 1994 - Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):62-63.
  18.  27
    Beyond Government Intervention: Drug Companies and Bioethics.Rebecca Dresser - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):42 – 43.
  19.  16
    Government Intervention and The Nation's Diet: The Slippery Slope of Inaction.Kelly D. Brownell - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):1-2.
  20. What Are the Proper Limits for Government Intervention in Our Lifestyles?: A Symposium Jointly Convened by the National Centre for Research Into the Prevention of Drug Abuse and the Kingswood Centre for Applied Ethics.D. Hawks (ed.) - 1993 - Curtin University of Technology.
  21.  12
    Armitage on Locke on International Theory: The Two Treatises of Government and the Right of Intervention.Paul Kelly - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (1):49-61.
    SummaryThe paper examines David Armitage's claim that Locke makes an important contribution to international theory by exploring the place of international relations within the Two Treatises of Government. Armitage's suggestion is that the place of international theory in Locke's canonical works is under-explored. In particular, the paper examines the implication of Locke's account of the executive power of the law of nature which allows third parties to punish breaches of the law of nature wherever they occur. The corollary is (...)
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  22.  5
    Changing Cultures? Government Intervention in Higher Education 1987–93.Mary Tasker & David Packham - 1994 - British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (2):150-162.
    This article argues that the academic values associated with intellectual freedom are incommensurable with those of industry which permeate recent related government initiatives associated with enterprise education and quality audit and assessment. It concludes that if industrial values are implanted in universities, they will destroy the academic values on which open intellectual enquiry and the disinterested pursuit of knowledge depend.
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  23.  42
    Paternalism and the Pokies: Unjustified State Interference or Justifiable Intervention[REVIEW]Elizabeth Prior Jonson, Margaret Lindorff & Linda McGuire - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):259-268.
    The Australian Productivity Commission and a Joint Select Committee on Gambling Reform have recommended implementation of a mandatory pre-commitment system for electronic gambling. Organizations associated with the gambling industry have protested that such interventions reduce individual rights, and will cause a reduction in revenue which will cost jobs and reduce gaming venue support for local communities. This article is not concerned with the design details or the evidence base of the proposed scheme, but rather with the fundamental criticism that a (...)
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  24.  13
    Farmer Innovation Diffusion Via Network Building: A Case of Winter Greenhouse Diffusion in China. [REVIEW]Bin Wu & Liyan Zhang - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):641-651.
    Farmer innovation diffusion (FID) in the developing world is not simply the adoption of an innovation made by farmers, but a process of communication and cooperation between farmers, governments, and other stakeholders. While increasing attention has been paid to farmer innovation, little is known about how farmers’ innovations are successfully diffused. To fill this gap, this paper aims to address the following questions: What conditions are necessary for farmers to participate in FID? How is a collaborative network built up between (...)
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  25. The Ethics of Nudge.Luc Bovens - 2008 - In Mats J. Hansson & Till Grüne-Yanoff (eds.), Preference Change: Approaches from Philosophy, Economics and Psychology. Berlin: Springer, Theory and Decision Library A. pp. 207-20.
    In their recently published book Nudge (2008) Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein (T&S) defend a position labelled as ‘libertarian paternalism’. Their thinking appeals to both the right and the left of the political spectrum, as evidenced by the bedfellows they keep on either side of the Atlantic. In the US, they have advised Barack Obama, while, in the UK, they were welcomed with open arms by the David Cameron's camp (Chakrabortty 2008). I will consider the following questions. What (...)
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  26.  47
    Humanitarian Intervention and the Modern State System.Patrick Emerton & Toby Handfield - 2015 - The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and War.
    This chapter argues that, because humanitarian intervention typically involves the military of one state attempting to overthrow another state ’s government, it gives rise to different moral questions from simple cases of interpersonal defensive violence. State sovereignty not only protects institutions within a society that contribute to the satisfaction of individuals’ interests and that cannot be easily restored once overthrown; it also plays a role in the constitution of those interests, which cannot be assumed to be invariant across (...)
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  27.  45
    Benevolent Government Now.Howard J. Curzer - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):74.
    Mencian benevolent government intervenes dramatically in many ways in the marketplace in order to secure the material well-being of the population, especially the poor and disadvantaged. Mencius considers this sort of intervention to be appropriate not just occasionally when dealing with natural disasters, but regularly. Furthermore, Mencius recommends shifting from regressive to progressive taxes. He favors reduction of inequality so as to reduce corruption of government by the wealthy, and opposes punishment for people driven to crime by (...)
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  28. Libertarianism.Matt Zwolinski - 2008 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This paper is an encyclopedia entry on the political philosophy of libertarianism, written for the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. It discusses the major contemporary strands of libertarianism and their historical roots, and presents some of the main criticisms of these strands. Its focus is on libertarianism as a doctrine about distributive justice and political authority, and specifically on the consequentialist and natural rights formulations of these views.
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  29. The Role of Government in East Asian Economic Development: Comparative Institutional Analysis.Masahiko Aoki, Hyung-Ki Kim & Masahiro Okuno-Fujiwara (eds.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The role of government in East Asian economic development has been a contentious issue. Two competing views have shaped enquiries into the source of the rapid growth of the high-performing Asian economies and attempts to derive a general lesson for other developing economies: the market-friendly view, according to which government intervenes little in the market, and the developmental state view, in which it governs the market. What these views share in common is a conception of market and (...) as alternative mechanisms for resource allocation. They are distinct only in their judgement of the extent to which market failures have been, and ought to be, remedied by direct government intervention. This collection of essays suggests a breakthrough, third view: the market-enhancing view. Instead of viewing government and the market as mutually exclusive substitutes, it examines the capacity of government policy to facilitate or complement private sector co-ordination. The book starts from the premiss that private sector institutions have important comparative advantages over government, in particular in their ability to process information available on site. At the same time, it recognizes that the capabilities of the private sector are more limited in developing economies. The market-enhancing view thus stresses the mechanisms whereby government policy is directed at improving the ability of the private sector to solve co-ordination problems and overcome other market imperfections. In presenting the market-enhancing view, the book recognizes the wide diversity of the roles of government across various East Asian economiesincluding Japan, Korea, Hong Kong, Malaysia, and China and its path-dependent and developmental stage nature. (shrink)
     
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  30. On Altruistic War and National Responsibility: Justifying Humanitarian Intervention to Soldiers and Taxpayers.Ned Dobos - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):19-31.
    The principle of absolute sovereignty may have been consigned to history, but a strong presumption against foreign intervention seems to have been left in its stead. On the dominant view, only massacre and ethnic cleansing justify armed intervention, these harms must be already occurring or imminent, and the prudential constraints on war must be satisfied. Each of these conditions has recently come under pressure. Those looking to defend the dominant view have typically done so by invoking international peace (...)
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  31. Humanitarian Intervention, Consent, and Proportionality.Jeff McMahan - 2009 - In N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen & Jeff McMahan (eds.), Ethics and Humanity: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Glover. Oxford University Press.
    However much one may wish for nonviolent solutions to the problems of unjust and unrestrained human violence that Glover explores in Humanity, some of those problems at present require violent responses. One cannot read his account of the Clinton administration’s campaign to sabotage efforts to stop the massacre in Rwanda in 1994 – a campaign motivated by fear that American involvement would cost American lives and therefore votes – without concluding that Glover himself believes that military intervention was morally (...)
     
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  32.  50
    Francisco De Vitoria and Humanitarian Intervention.James Muldoon - 2006 - Journal of Military Ethics 5 (2):128-143.
    Humanitarian intervention is a staple of current discussions about relations among states. Should powerful states interfere in the internal affairs of weaker ones, particularly those identified as failed states, in order to bring peace and stability when it is clear that the existing government can not do so? The concept is an old one, not a new one. European nations that engaged in overseas expansion generally justified their conquests on the grounds that they would seek to civilise and (...)
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  33. Humanitarian Intervention: Moral and Philosophical Issues.Aleksandar Jokic (ed.) - 2003 - Broadview Press.
    International law makes it explicit that states shall not intervene militarily or otherwise in the affairs of other states; it is a central principle of the charter of the United Nations. But international law also provides an exception; when a conflict within a state poses a threat to international peace, military intervention by the UN may be warranted.. The Charter and other UN documents also assert that human rights are to be protected — but in the past the responsibility (...)
     
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  34.  70
    The Burden of Autonomy, Non-Combatant Immunity and Humanitarian Intervention.William Cornwell - 2005 - Ethical Perspectives 12 (3):341-355.
    Michael Walzer argues that except in cases involving genocide or mass slaughter, humanitarian intervention is unjustifiable because “citizens get the government they deserve, or, at least, the government for which they are ‘fit.’”Yet, if people are autonomous and deserve the government that rules over them, then it would seem that they are responsible for the government’s actions, including their nation’s wars of aggression.That line of thought undermines the doctrine of noncombatant immunity, which is perhaps the (...)
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  35. Military Intervention, Humanitarian.Robert Hoag - 2015
    Humanitarian Military Intervention Humanitarian intervention is a use of military force to address extraordinary suffering of people, such as genocide or similar, large-scale violation of basic of human rights, where people’s suffering results from their own government’s actions or failures to act. These interventions are also called “armed interventions,” or “armed humanitarian interventions,” or “humanitarian … Continue reading Military Intervention, Humanitarian →.
     
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  36.  42
    Rebellion, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Prudential Constraints on War.Ned Dobos - 2008 - Journal of Military Ethics 7 (2):102-115.
    Both radical rebellion and humanitarian intervention aim to defend citizens against tyranny and human rights abuses at the hands of their government. The only difference is that rebellion is waged by the oppressed subjects themselves, while humanitarian intervention is carried out by foreigners on their behalf. In this paper, it is argued that the prudential constraints on war (last resort, probability of success, and proportionality) impose tighter restrictions on, or demand more of, humanitarian interveners than they do (...)
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  37. Humanitarian Intervention: Moral and Philosophical Issues.Burleigh Wilkins - 2003 - Broadview Press.
    International law makes it explicit that states shall not intervene militarily or otherwise in the affairs of other states; it is a central principle of the charter of the United Nations. But international law also provides an exception; when a conflict within a state poses a threat to international peace, military intervention by the UN may be warranted. (Indeed, the UN Charter provides for an international police force, though nothing has ever come of this provision). The Charter and other (...)
     
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  38.  50
    Just War Theory, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Need for a Democratic Federation.John J. Davenport - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):493-555.
    The primary purpose of government is to secure public goods that cannot be achieved by free markets. The Coordination Principle tells us to consolidate sovereign power in a single institution to overcome collective action problems that otherwise prevent secure provision of the relevant public goods. There are several public goods that require such coordination at the global level, chief among them being basic human rights. The claim that human rights require global coordination is supported in three main steps. First, (...)
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  39.  45
    Just Military Preparedness, U.S. Military Hegemony, and Contingency Planning for Intervention in Sudan.Harry van der Linden - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):135-152.
    This paper rejects most aspects of John W. Lango and Eric Patterson’s proposal that the United States should plan for a possible intervention in Sudan on secessionist and humanitarian grounds and announce this planning as a deterrent to the central government of Sudan attacking the people of South Sudan if they would opt in a January 2011 referendum for independence. I argue that secession is not a just cause for armed intervention and that, rightfully, neither the American (...)
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  40.  22
    The Fundamental Right of Medical Necessity and Genetic Intervention for Substance Abuse.William Kitchin - 2006 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 15 (1):1.
    Genetic intervention is on the near horizon for the treatment of substance abu se. Genetic intervention involves a reprogramming of a person’s own genetic instructions so that that person will no longer have the physical craving for the drug of choice. Unlike pharmacologic intervention, genetic intervention will change the genetic identity of the person, albeit slightly. The legal issue is whether one has a fundamental right to this medical procedure. A fundamental right is one that the (...)
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  41.  24
    Paternalistic Intervention: The Moral Bounds on Benevolence.Raymond B. Marcin - 1988 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (3):637-640.
    In the grand debate between the paternalist and the libertarian, VanDeVeer sides decidedly with the libertarian. Paternalistic intervention he regards as presumptively wrong, and so the question becomes whether there are countervailing, morally relevant considerations by which paternalistic intervention can be justified. In shifting the burden of justification to the paternalist, VanDeVeer is not being innovative. H. L. A. Hart broke that ground in his Law, Liberty, and Morality in 1963, and Ronald Dworkin used the technique effectively in (...)
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  42.  3
    Hidden Government Influence Over Privatized Banks.Ehud Kamar & Assaf Hamdani - 2012 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 13 (2):567-596.
    In this Article we examine Israel’s ongoing process of bank privatization to explore the link between privatization programs and the ownership structure of public companies. Our thesis is that concentrated ownership provides regulators with a platform for exerting informal influence over corporate decision-making. This platform serves regulators as a safety valve when all else fails, especially when they would like firms to terminate senior executives or board members. Communicating with controlling shareholders increases the likelihood that both the regulatory intervention (...)
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  43.  6
    Just Military Preparedness, U.S. Military Hegemony, and Contingency Planning for Intervention in Sudan: A Reply to Lango and Patterson.Harry van der Linden - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):135-152.
    This paper rejects most aspects of John W. Lango and Eric Patterson’s proposal that the United States should plan for a possible intervention in Sudan on secessionist and humanitarian grounds and announce this planning as a deterrent to the central government of Sudan attacking the people of South Sudan if they would opt in a January 2011 referendum for independence. I argue that secession is not a just cause for armed intervention and that, rightfully, neither the American (...)
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  44.  3
    South Sudan Independence: Contingency Planning About Just Armed Intervention.John W. Lango & Eric Patterson - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):117-134.
    We investigate how the just cause principle is applicable to contingency planning about armed interventions in civil wars that are somewhat likely to occur in the future. According to a 2005 peace agreement that formally ended a civil war between the Sudanese government in Khartoum and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, a referendum on South Sudan independence is to be held no later than January 9, 2011. Close observers of Sudan warn that this promise of an independence referendum might (...)
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  45.  2
    Tort Law and Victorian Government Growth: The Historiographical Significance of Tort in the Shadow of Chemical Pollution and Factory Safety Regulation.Ben Pontin - 1998 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 18 (4):661-680.
    This paper deals with the role of tort in the field of chemical air pollution regulation during the period 1863, when the first statutory intervention occurred, and 1881, when reforms to both the common law and statute were enacted. It compares the prominence of tort in this context with its significance in the field of injury to factory workers. The implications of tort's relevance in these contexts are then examined, having particular regard to those historiographies of Victorian government (...)
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  46. Human Rights and Self-Government in the Age of Cosmopolitan Interventionism.Michael Kocsis - 2013 - Dissertation, Queen's University
    This dissertation explores a family of theoretical models of humanitarian military intervention. A number of recent theorists, including Tesón, Caney, Buchanan, Orend, Moellendorf, and Wheeler, build their models from a perspective called ‘cosmopolitanism.’ They offer arguments based on the moral supremacy of human rights, the arbitrary character of territorial boundaries, and the duty to protect individual human beings exposed to serious and systematic violence by their own governments. I develop a model of intervention that recognizes the moral significance (...)
     
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  47.  8
    External Intervention and the Politics of State Formation: China, Indonesia, and Thailand, 1893–1952.Ja Ian Chong - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Molding the institutions of governance: theories of state formation and the contingency of sovereignty in fragile polities; 2. Imposing states: foreign rivalries, local collaboration, and state form in peripheral polities; 3. Feudalizing the Chinese polity, 1893-1922: assessing the adequacy of alternative takes on state-reorganization; 4. External influence and China's feudalization, 1893-1922: opportunity costs and patterns of foreign intervention; 5. The evolution of foreign involvement in China, 1923-52: rising opportunity costs and convergent approaches to (...); 6. How intervention remade the Chinese state, 1923-52: foreign sponsorship and the building of sovereign China; 7. Creating Indonesia, 1893-1952: major power rivalry and the making of sovereign statehood; 8. Siam stands apart, 1893-1952: external intervention and rise of a sovereign Thai state; 9. Domesticating international relations, externalizing comparative politics: foreign intervention and the state in world politics. (shrink)
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  48. Divine Intervention: Metaphysical and Epistemological Puzzles.Evan Fales - 2009 - Routledge.
    This study is a new look at the question of how God can act upon the world, and whether the world can affect God, examining contemporary work on the metaphysics of causation and laws of nature, and current work in the theory of knowledge and mysticism. It has been traditional to address such questions by appealing to God’s omnipotence and omniscience, but this book claims that this is useless unless it can be shown how these two powers "work." Instead of (...)
     
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  49.  12
    Demographic and Farm Characteristic Differences in Ontario Farmers' Views About Sustainability Policies.Glen C. Filson - 1996 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (2):165-180.
    This study was undertaken to assess farmers’ attitudes toward sustainable agriculture and the environment. The majority of Ontario farmers in this 1991 survey supported the need for government policies which promote sustainable agriculture but there were major differences in the government policies which farmers thought would be sustainable or desirable. Most farmers felt the Government should promote diversified rural economic development, sponsor appropriate research and provide conservation grants to farmers willing to change to more sensitive environmental methods. (...)
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  50.  6
    Helping the Rebels.Massimo Renzo - 2018 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 13 (3).
    In a pair of recent papers, Allen Buchanan has outlined an ambitious account of the ethics of revolution and its implications for military intervention. Buchanan’s account is bold and yet sophisticated. It is bold in that it advances a number of theses that will no doubt strike the reader as highly controversial; it is sophisticated in that it rests on a nuanced account of how revolutions unfold and the constraints that political self-determination places on intervention. He argues that, (...)
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