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Grant Gillett [129]Grant R. Gillett [33]
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Grant Gillett
University of Otago
  1.  20
    The Biopsychosocial Model of Health and Disease: New Philosophical and Scientific Developments.Derek Bolton & Grant Gillett - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This open access book is a systematic update of the philosophical and scientific foundations of the biopsychosocial model of health, disease and healthcare. First proposed by George Engel 40 years ago, the Biopsychosocial Model is much cited in healthcare settings worldwide, but has been increasingly criticised for being vague, lacking in content, and in need of reworking in the light of recent developments. The book confronts the rapid changes to psychological science, neuroscience, healthcare, and philosophy that have occurred since the (...)
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  2.  50
    Moral Theory and Medical Practice. [REVIEW]Grant Gillett - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):379.
    In this unique study Fulford combines the disciplines of rigorous philosophy with an intimate knowledge of psychopathology to overturn traditional hegemonies. The patient replaces the doctor at the heart of medicine. Moral theory and the logic of evaluation replace epistemology as the focus of philosophical enquiry. Ever controversial, mental illness is at the interface of philosophy and medicine. Mad or bad? Dissident or diseased? Dr Fulford shows that it is possible to achieve new insights into these traditional dilemmas, insights at (...)
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  3.  32
    What We Owe the Psychopath: A Neuroethical Analysis.Grant Gillett & Jiaochen Huang - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (2):3-9.
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  4.  4
    Moral Theory and Medical Practice.Grant Gillett - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):379-381.
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  5.  31
    The Crisis of Patient‐Physician Trust and Bioethics: Lessons and Inspirations From China.Jing‐Bao Nie, Lun Li, Grant Gillett, Joseph D. Tucker & Arthur Kleinman - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (1):56-64.
    Trust is indispensable not only for interpersonal relationships and social life, but for good quality healthcare. As manifested in the increasing violence and tension in patient-physician relationships, China has been experiencing a widespread and profound crisis of patient–physician trust. And globally, the crisis of trust is an issue that every society, either developing or developed, has to face in one way or another. Yet, in spite of some pioneering works, the subject of patient-physician trust and mistrust – a crucial matter (...)
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  6.  59
    Representation, Meaning, and Thought.Grant Gillett - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    This study examines the relationship between thought and language by considering the views of Kant and the later Wittgenstein along with many strands of contemporary debate in the area of mental content. Building on an analysis of the nature of concepts and conceptions of objects, Gillett provides an account of psychological explanation and the subject of experience, offers a novel perspective on mental representation and linguistic meaning, looks at the difficult topics of cognitive roles and singular thought, and concludes with (...)
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  7.  41
    The Subjective Brain, Identity, and Neuroethics.Grant R. Gillett - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):5-13.
    The human brain is subjective and reflects the life of a being-in-the-world-with-others whose identity reflects that complex engaged reality. Human subjectivity is shaped and in-formed (formed by inner processes) that are adapted to the human life-world and embody meaning and the relatedness of a human being. Questions of identity relate to this complex and dynamic reality to reflect the fact that biology, human ecology, culture, and one's historic-political situation are inscribed in one's neural network and have configured its architecture so (...)
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  8.  14
    Subjectivity and Being Somebody: Human Identity and Neuroethics. [REVIEW]Grant Gillett - 2010 - Analysis 70 (1):198-200.
    ‘Neuroethics’ is a term which has come into use in the last few years, and which is variously defined. In the Preface to his book, Grant Gillett indicates the sense in which he is using it: the central questions in neuroethics, he says, are those of ‘human identity, consciousness and moral responsibility or the problem of the will’. His aim is to offer an account of human identity which can shed light on issues both in general philosophy and in bioethics.The (...)
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  9. Bioethics in the Clinic: Hippocratic Reflections.Grant R. Gillett - 2004 - JHU Press.
    What is so special about human life? What is the relationship between flesh and blood and the human soul? Is there a kind of life that is worse than death? Can a person die and yet the human organism remain in some real sense alive? Can souls become sick? What justifies cutting into a living human body? These and other questions, writes neurosurgeon and philosopher Grant Gillett, pervade hospital wards, clinical offices, and operating rooms. In Bioethics in the Clinic: Hippocratic (...)
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  10.  90
    Minimally Conscious States, Deep Brain Stimulation, and What is Worse Than Futility.Grant Gillett - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):145-149.
    The concept of futility is sometimes regarded as a cloak for medical paternalism in that it rolls together medical and value judgments. Often, despite attempts to disambiguate the concept, that is true and it can be applied in such a way as to marginalize the real interests of a patient. I suggest we replace it with a conceptual toolkit that includes physiological futility, substantial benefit (SB), and the risk of unacceptable badness (RUB) in that these concepts allow us to articulate (...)
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  11.  44
    The Mind and its Discontents: An Essay in Discursive Psychiatry.Grant Gillett - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    The first edition of The Mind and its Discontents was a powerful analysis of how, as a society, we view mental illness. In the ten years since the first edition, there has been growing interest in the philosophy of psychiatry, and a new edition of this text is more timely and important than ever. -/- In The Mind and its Discontents, Grant Gillett argues that an understanding of mental illness requires more than just a study of biological models of mental (...)
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  12.  1
    Subjectivity and Being Somebody: Human Identity and Neuroethics.Grant Gillett - 2008 - Imprint Academic.
    This book uses a neo-Aristotelian framework to examine human subjectivity as an embodied being. It examines the varieties of reductionism that affect philosophical writing about human origins and identity, and explores the nature of rational subjectivity as emergent from our neurobiological constitution. This allows a consideration of the effect of neurological interventions such as psychosurgery, neuroimplantation, and the promise of cyborgs on the image of the human. It then examines multiple personality disorder and its implications for narrative theories of the (...)
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  13.  20
    Evolutionary Neurology, Responsive Equilibrium, and the Moral Brain.Grant Gillett & Elizabeth Franz - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 45:245-250.
  14.  9
    Persons and Personality: A Contemporary Inquiry.Arthur R. Peacocke & Grant R. Gillett (eds.) - 1987 - Blackwell.
  15. Perception and Neuroscience.Grant R. Gillett - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (March) 83 (March):83-103.
    Perception is often analysed as a process in which causal events from the environment act on a subject to produce states in the mind or brain. The role of the subject is an increasing feature of neuroscientific and cognitive literature. This feature is linked to the need for an account of the normative aspects of perceptual competence. A holographic model is offered in which objects are presented to the subject classified according to rules governing concepts and encoded in brain function (...)
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  16.  19
    Concepts, Structures, and Meanings.Grant R. Gillett - 1987 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 30 (March):101-112.
    Concepts are basic elements of thought. Piaget has a conception of the nature of concepts as informational or computational operations performed in an inner milieu and enabling the child to understand the world in which it lives and acts. Concepts are, however, not merely logico?mathematical but are also conceptually linked to the mastery of language which itself involves the appropriate use of words in social and interpersonal settings. In the light of Vygotsky's work on the social and interactive nature of (...)
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  17.  33
    AIDS and Confidentiality.Grant Gillett - 1987 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):15-20.
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  18.  53
    Moral Insanity and Practical Reason.Carl Elliott & Grant Gillett - 1992 - Philosophical Psychology 5 (1):53 – 67.
    The psychopathic personality disorder historically has been thought to include an insensitivity to morality. Some have thought that the psychopath's insensitivity indicates that he does not understand morality, but the relationship between the psychopath's defects and moral understanding has been unclear. We attempt to clarify this relationship, first by arguing that moral understanding is incomplete without concern for morality, and second, by showing that the psychopath demonstrates defects in frontal lobe activity which indicate impaired attention and adaptation to environmental conditions (...)
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  19.  39
    Intention, Autonomy, and Brain Events.Grant Gillett - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (6):330-339.
    Informed consent is the practical expression of the doctrine of autonomy. But the very idea of autonomy and conscious free choice is undercut by the view that human beings react as their unconscious brain centres dictate, depending on factors that may or may not be under rational control and reflection. This worry is, however, based on a faulty model of human autonomy and consciousness and needs close neurophilosophical scrutiny. A critique of the ethics implied by the model takes us towards (...)
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  20.  27
    Representations and Cognitive Science.Grant R. Gillett - 1989 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 32 (September):261-77.
    ?Representation? is a concept which occurs both in cognitive science and philosophy. It has common features in both settings in that it concerns the explanation of behaviour in terms of the way the subject categorizes and systematizes responses to its environment. The prevailing model sees representations as causally structured entities correlated on the one hand with elements in a natural language and on the other with clearly identifiable items in the world. This leads to an analysis of representation and cognition (...)
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  21.  24
    Consciousness, the Brain and What Matters.Grant Gillett - 1990 - Bioethics 4 (3):181–198.
    Grant Gillett argues that it is consciousness which makes a human or other being the 'locus of ethical value'. Since cortical functioning is, in Gillett's view, necessary for conscious activity, an individual whose neocortex is permanently non-functional is no longer a locus of ethical value and cannot be benefited or harmed in a morally relevant sense. This means that there is no obligation to continue treating those who have suffered neocortical death.
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  22. The Mind and its Discontents.Grant Gillett - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The first edition of The Mind and its Discontents was a powerful analysis of how, as a society, we view mental illness, looking beyond just biological models of mental pathologies. In the ten years since, there has been growing interest in the philosophy of psychiatry, and a new edition of this text is more timely and important than ever.
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  23.  11
    Representation, Meaning, and Thought.Kent Bach & Grant Gillett - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (3):544.
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  24.  33
    Multiple Personality and Irrationality.Grant Gillett - 1991 - Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):103-118.
    Abstract The phenomenology of Multiple Personality (MP) syndrome is used to derive an Aristotelian explanation of the failure to achieve rational integration of mental content. An MP subject is best understood as having failed to master the techniques of integrating conative and cognitive aspects of her mental life. This suggests that in irrationality the subject may lack similar skills basic to the proper articulation and use of mental content in belief formation and control of action. The view that emerges centres (...)
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  25.  25
    Culture, Truth, and Science After Lacan.Grant Gillett - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):633-644.
    Truth and knowledge are conceptually related and there is a way of construing both that implies that they cannot be solely derived from a description that restricts itself to a set of scientific facts. In the first section of this essay, I analyse truth as a relation between a praxis, ways of knowing, and the world. In the second section, I invoke the third thing—the objective reality on which we triangulate as knowing subjects for the purpose of complex scientific endeavours (...)
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  26.  10
    Medicine and Moral Reasoning.K. W. M. Fulford, Grant Gillett & Janet Martin Soskice (eds.) - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection examines prevalent assumptions in moral reasoning which are often accepted uncritically in medical ethics. It introduces a range of perspectives from philosophy and medicine on the nature of moral reasoning and relates these to illustrative problems, such as New Reproductive Technologies, the treatment of sick children, the assessment of quality of life, genetics, involuntary psychiatric treatment and abortion. In each case, the contributors address the nature and worth of the moral theories involved in discussions of the relevant issues, (...)
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  27.  22
    Ethical Considerations for Performing Decompressive Craniectomy as a Life-Saving Intervention for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.Stephen Honeybul, Grant Gillett, Kwok Ho & Christopher Lind - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):657-661.
    In all fields of clinical medicine, there is an increasing awareness that outcome must be assessed in terms of quality of life and cost effectiveness, rather than merely length of survival. This is especially the case when considering decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury. The procedure itself is technically straightforward and involves temporarily removing a large section of the skull vault in order to provide extra space into which the injured brain can expand. A number of studies have demonstrated (...)
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  28.  12
    Honouring the Donor: In Death and in Life.Grant Gillett - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):149-152.
    Elective ventilation (EV) is ventilation—not to save a patient's life, but with the expectation that s/he will die—in the hope that organs can be retrieved in the best possible state. The arguments for doing such a thing rest on the value of the lives being saved by the donated organs, maximally honouring the donor's wishes where the patient can be reasonably thought to wish to donate, and a general principle in favour of organ donation where possible as an expression of (...)
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  29.  73
    The Neurophilosophy of Pain.Grant R. Gillett - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (April):191-206.
    The ability to feel pain is a property of human beings that seems to be based entirely in our biological natures and to place us squarely within the animal kingdom. Yet the experience of pain is often used as an example of a mental attribute with qualitative properties that defeat attempts to identify mental events with physiological mechanisms. I will argue that neurophysiology and psychology help to explain the interwoven biological and subjective features of pain and recommend a view of (...)
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  30. The Generality Constraint and Conscious Thought.Grant R. Gillett - 1987 - Analysis 47 (January):20-24.
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  31.  25
    Consciousness and Brain Function.Grant R. Gillett - 1988 - Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):325-39.
    Abstract The language of consciousness and that of brain function seem vastly different and incommensurable ways of approaching human mental life. If we look at what we mean by consciousness we find that it has a great deal to do with the sensitivity and responsiveness shown by a subject toward things that happen. Philosophically, we can understnd ascriptions of consciousness best by looking at the conditions which make it true for thinkers who share the concept to say that one of (...)
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  32. Brain Bisection and Personal Identity.Grant R. Gillett - 1986 - Mind 95 (April):224-9.
    It has been argued that 'brain bisection' data leads us to abandon our traditional conception of personal identity. Nagel has remarked: The ultimate account of the unity of what we call a single mind consists of an enumeration of the types of functional integration that typify it. We know that these can be eroded in different ways and to different degrees. The belief that even in their complete version they can be explained by the presence of a numerically single subject (...)
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  33.  20
    The Bioethical Structure of a Human Being.Paul Copland & Grant Gillett - 2003 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):123–131.
    Bioethical debates such as those surrounding the manipulation of human embryos are often based on metaphysical assumptions that lack a foundation in the natural sciences. In this paper we support a gradualist position whereby the embryo progressively takes on the form and associated ethical significance of a human being. We support this position by introducing a concept of biological structure or form to show how the gradualist position has its metaphysical foundations in modern biology. The conceptual basis for form and (...)
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  34.  21
    Duties to Kin Through a Tragi-Comic Lens.Grant Gillett & Robin Hankey - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):173-180.
    Euripides’ Alcestis (1959) raises the issue of ethical duties within families and exposes the romantic postures and rhetoric that can dominate such discussions. Should anybody be asked to sacrifice themselves or even undergo significant health risks for members of their own family? (An issue that is also relevant in considering our duties to future generations in terms of the earth we leave to them.) The issue that is dramatized to a heroic level in Alcestis arises in live organ and tissue (...)
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  35.  11
    The Conceptual Link From Physical to Mental. By Robert Kirk. Oxford: University Press, 2013. 252pp, £35. ISBN 10: 0199669414. [REVIEW]Grant Gillett - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (2):352-357.
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  36.  5
    The Nature of True Minds.Grant Gillett - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (179):240-241.
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  37. Multiple Personality and the Concept of a Person.Grant R. Gillett - 1986 - New Ideas in Psychology 4:173-84.
  38.  6
    Concussion in Sport: The Unheeded Evidence.Grant Gillett - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):710-716.
    :Patients with repeated minor head injury are a challenge to our clinical skills of neurodiagnosis because the relevant evidence objectively demonstrating their impairment was collected in New Zealand and, at the time, was mired in controversy. The effects of repeated closed diffuse head injury are increasingly recognized worldwide, but now suffer from the relentless advance of imaging technology as the dominant form of neurodiagnosis and the considerable financial interests that underpin the refusal to recognize that acute accelerational injury is the (...)
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  39.  37
    Learning to Perceive.Grant Gillett - 1988 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (June):601-618.
  40.  10
    Effaced Enigmata.Grant Gillett - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (4):616-627.
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  41.  24
    Elective Ventilation Reply to Kluge.Alister Browne, Grant Gillett & Martin Tweeddale - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):248–253.
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  42.  9
    How Do I Learn to Be Me Again? Autonomy, Life Skills, and Identity.Grant Gillett - 2012 - In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press.
  43.  6
    Killing, Letting Die and Moral Perception.Grant Gillett - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (4):312-328.
    ABSTRACTThere are a number of arguments that purport to show, in general terms, that there is no difference between killing and letting die. These are used to justify active euthanasia on the basis of the reasons given for allowing patients to die. I argue that the general and abstract arguments fail to take account of the complex and particular situations which are found in the care of those with terminal illness. When in such situations, there are perceptions and intuitions available (...)
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  44.  79
    Therapeutic Action.Grant Gillett - 2004 - Mind 113 (452):769-771.
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  45.  14
    Minding and Caring About Ethics in Brain Injury.Grant Gillett - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):44-45.
    Joseph Fins's book Rights Come to Mind: Brain Injury, Ethics, and the Struggle for Consciousness is a considerable addition to the literature on disorders of consciousness and the murky area of minimally conscious states. Fins brings to this fraught area of clinical practice and neuroethical analysis a series of stories and reflections resulting in a pressing and sustained ethical challenge both to clinicians and to health care systems. The challenge is multifaceted, with diagnostic and therapeutic demands to be met by (...)
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  46.  40
    Killing, Letting Die and Moral Perception.Grant Gillett - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (4):312–328.
    ABSTRACTThere are a number of arguments that purport to show, in general terms, that there is no difference between killing and letting die. These are used to justify active euthanasia on the basis of the reasons given for allowing patients to die. I argue that the general and abstract arguments fail to take account of the complex and particular situations which are found in the care of those with terminal illness. When in such situations, there are perceptions and intuitions available (...)
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  47. Moral Responsibility, Consciousness and Psychiatry.John McMillan & Grant R. Gillett - 2005 - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 39 (11):1018-1021.
  48.  90
    The Neurodynamics of Free Will.Grant Gillett & Walter Glannon - 2020 - Mind and Matter 18 (2):159-173.
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  49.  48
    Bao-Yu: A Mental Disorder or a Cultural Icon?Flora Huang & Grant Gillett - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):183-189.
    The embodied human subject is dynamically connected to his or her historico-sociocultural context, the soil from which a person’s psyche is nourished as multiplex meanings are absorbed and enable personal development. In each culture certain towering artistic works embody this perspective. The Dream of the Red Chamber introduces Jia Bao-yu—a scion of the prestigious Jia family—and his relationships with a large cast of characters. Bao-yu is controversial but, at the time of the family’s tragic collapse, he can be seen as (...)
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  50.  41
    Delusions: A Different Kind of Belief?Richard Mullen & Grant Gillett - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (1):27-37.
    Delusions, a key feature of psychosis, are usually thought of as a type of belief, as in the definition of the American Psychiatric Association: A false belief based on incorrect inference about external reality that is firmly sustained despite what almost everyone else believes and despite what constitutes incontrovertible and obvious proof or evidence to the contrary. The belief is not one ordinarily accepted by other members of the person’s culture or subculture (e.g. it is not an article of religious (...)
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