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Greg Littmann
Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
  1. H.P. Lovecraft’s Philosophy of Science Fiction Horror.Greg Littmann - 2018 - Science Fictions Popular Cultures Academics Conference Proceedings:60-75.
    The paper is an examination and critique of the philosophy of science fiction horror of seminal American horror, science fiction and fantasy writer H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). Lovecraft never directly offers a philosophy of science fiction horror. However, at different points in his essays and letters, he addresses genres he labels “interplanetary fiction”, “horror”, “supernatural horror”, and “weird fiction”, the last being a broad heading covering both supernatural fiction and science fiction. Taken together, a philosophy of science fiction horror emerges. Central (...)
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  2.  89
    Moments of Change.Greg Littmann - 2012 - Acta Analytica 27 (1):29-44.
    There is a strong intuition that for a change to occur, there must be a moment at which the change is taking place. It will be demonstrated that there are no such moments of change, since no state the changing thing could be in at any moment would suffice to make that moment a moment of change. A moment in which the changing thing is simply in the state changed from or the state changed to cannot be the moment of (...)
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  3.  9
    Why Don't the Proles Just Takes Over.Greg Littmann - 2018 - In Ezio Di Nucci & Stefan Storrie (eds.), 1984 and Philosophy. Open Court Publishing.
    George Orwell wondered why oppressed proletariats in the communist and capitalist worlds did not rise up and replace the governments that oppressed them with something better for them. This is a puzzle we still face today, wherever a majority faces exploitation. The chapter examines the question of why exploited peoples don’t replace exploitative governments in their own best interest, whether through revolution or through the ballot box. The question is examined through the lens of the political philosophy and political fiction (...)
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  4.  9
    American Gods is All Lies!Greg Littmann - 2012 - In Tracy Lyn Bealer, Rachel Luria & Wayne Yuen (eds.), Neil Gaiman and Philosophy: Gods Gone Wild! Open Court.
    The chapter is a comparison of Platonic and Aristotelian conceptions of artistic value in literature, with particular focus of the appropriate role of the divine and supernatural. The issue is explored through the lens of Neil Gaiman's popular fantasy novel, American Gods. It is argued that Aristotle’s less restrictive model of literary value better allows literature to benefit us as human beings. In particular, Aristotle's appreciation of the need for dark themes and counter-factual portrayals of the universe allows for much (...)
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  5.  81
    Darwin's Doubt Defended: Why Evolution Supports Skepticism.Greg Littmann - 2011 - Philosophical Papers 40 (1):81-103.
    Since the time of Charles Darwin, there has been concern that the theory of evolution provides fuel for skepticism. This paper presents new arguments that humanity's evolutionary origins are grounds for accepting that the universe is not as it appears to be to us. Firstly, it is argued that we should expect to have an incomplete capacity to comprehend the universe: both the mental limitations of all non-human life and the narrow interests of most humans provide evidence for this. Secondly, (...)
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  6.  62
    Dialetheism and the Graphic Liar.Greg Littmann - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):15-27.
    A Liar sentence is a sentence that, paradoxically, we cannot evaluate for truth in accordance with classical logic and semantics without arriving at a contradiction. For example, consider L If we assume that L is true, then given that what L says is ‘L is false,’ it follows that L is false. On the other hand, if we assume that L is false, then given that what L says is ‘L is false,’ it follows that L is true. Thus, L (...)
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  7.  14
    Contradictory Change.Greg Littmann - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):227-236.
    Graham Priest has argued that changes occur at a moment of change in which objects are in a contradictory state, being in both the state changed from and the state changed to. In “Moments of Change,” the current author rejected this model on the grounds that every change would require an infinite number of other changes, and that for similar regress problems, the model is not compatible with the Leibniz Continuity Condition that Priest appeals to in the model’s support. In (...)
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  8.  32
    Writing Philosophy for the Public is a Moral Obligation.Greg Littmann - 2014 - Essays in Philosophy 15 (1):103-116.
    Writing philosophy to be read by people who are not professional philosophers ought to be central to the work of professional philosophers. Writing for the public should be central to their work because their professional end is to produce ideas for use by people who are not professional philosophers. Philosophy is unlike most disciplines in that the ideas produced by professional philosophers generally have to be understood by a person before they can be of any use to them. As a (...)
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  9.  4
    Terror From the Stars: Alien as Lovecraftian Horror.Greg Littmann - 2017 - In Kevin S. Decker & James Ewing (eds.), Alien and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    One reason why the continued popularity of the film Alien (1979) is philosophically interesting is that it bears out the aesthetic theories of seminal American horror-writer H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937) about what makes good science-fiction horror. Lovecraft never directly offers a philosophy of science-fiction horror. However, at different points in his essays and letters, he address genres he labels “interplanetary fiction”, “horror”, “supernatural horror”, and “weird fiction”, the last being a broad heading covering both supernatural fiction and science fiction. Taken together, (...)
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  10.  16
    Seriously Funny.Greg Littmann - 2014 - The Philosophers' Magazine 64:54-59.
    This chapter examines the ethics of political comedy as exemplified by The Daily Show, investigating the issue of when, if ever, it is appropriate to use comedy as a political tool. It is argued that mockery may be useful as a way to keep political issues on people's minds, though it becomes dangerous when used as a substitute for reason.
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  11.  9
    Seriously Funny.Greg Littmann - 2014 - The Philosophers' Magazine 64:54-59.
    This chapter examines the ethics of political comedy as exemplified by The Daily Show, investigating the issue of when, if ever, it is appropriate to use comedy as a political tool. It is argued that mockery may be useful as a way to keep political issues on people's minds, though it becomes dangerous when used as a substitute for reason.
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  12. Frankenstein and Philosophy: The Shocking Truth.Michael Hauskeller, Danilo Chaib, Greg Littmann, Dale Jacquette, Elena Casetta & Luca Tambolo - 2013 - Open Court.
    That twenty-first century Prometheus Dr. Nicolas Michaud and his uncannily dedicated team have stitched together sundry pieces of tissue torn from movies, TV shows, comics, and novels, and assembled these into a single bodily form with some resemblance to an intelligent being, yet possessed of disconcerting oddities, including the disturbing habit of asking strange questions:- Why do we assume that ugly is evil?- Are we responsible for what our creations do?- Was Dr. Frankenstein's creature a monster, and what makes something (...)
     
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