Results for 'Greg Rosencrance'

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  1.  55
    Physician-patient relations: No more models.Greg Clarke, Robert T. Hall & Greg Rosencrance - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):16 – 19.
    Currently, the common theoretical models of "preferred" decision-making relationships do not correspond well with clinical experience. This interview study of congestive heart failure (CHF) patients documents the variety of patient preferences for decision-making, and the necessity for attention to family involvement. In addition, these findings illustrate the confusion as to the designation of surrogate decision-makers and physicians in charge. We conclude that no single model of physician-patient decision-making should be preferred, and that physicians should first ask patients how they want (...)
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  2. Negation on the Australian Plan.Francesco Berto & Greg Restall - 2019 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 48 (6):1119-1144.
    We present and defend the Australian Plan semantics for negation. This is a comprehensive account, suitable for a variety of different logics. It is based on two ideas. The first is that negation is an exclusion-expressing device: we utter negations to express incompatibilities. The second is that, because incompatibility is modal, negation is a modal operator as well. It can, then, be modelled as a quantifier over points in frames, restricted by accessibility relations representing compatibilities and incompatibilities between such points. (...)
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  3. The No‐Miracles Argument for Realism: Inference to an Unacceptable Explanation.Greg Frost-Arnold - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (1):35-58.
    I argue that a certain type of naturalist should not accept a prominent version of the no-miracles argument (NMA). First, scientists (usually) do not accept explanations whose explanans-statements neither generate novel predictions nor unify apparently disparate established claims. Second, scientific realism (as it appears in the NMA) is an explanans that makes no new predictions and fails to unify disparate established claims. Third, many proponents of the NMA explicitly adopt a naturalism that forbids philosophy of science from using any methods (...)
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  4.  84
    Complete lives in the balance.Samuel J. Kerstein & Greg Bognar - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):37 – 45.
    The allocation of scarce health care resources such as flu treatment or organs for transplant presents stark problems of distributive justice. Persad, Wertheimer, and Emanuel have recently proposed a novel system for such allocation. Their “complete lives system” incorporates several principles, including ones that prescribe saving the most lives, preserving the most life-years, and giving priority to persons between 15 and 40 years old. This paper argues that the system lacks adequate moral foundations. Persad and colleagues' defense of giving priority (...)
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  5.  40
    Corporate Political Donations: Influences from Directors’ Networks.Yi Lu, Greg Shailer & Mark Wilson - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (3):461-481.
    Motivated by contemporary debates concerning whether directors inappropriately deploy corporate funds for corporate political donations and the limited research into managerial influence on corporate political donations, we examine the impact of director influences from a network perspective. Using a sample of large listed Australian corporations and their political party donation activity during 2000–2007, we find that both the professional and non-professional networks of directors influence corporate political donations. We observe these influences in relation to donations at the federal and state (...)
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  6. A participatory model of the atonement.Tim Bayne & Greg Restall - 2008 - In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New waves in philosophy of religion. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 150.
    In this paper we develop a participatory model of the Christian doctrine of the atonement, according to which the atonement involves participating in the death and resurrection of Christ. In part one we argue that current models of the atonement—exemplary, penal, substitutionary and merit models—are unsatisfactory. The central problem with these models is that they assume a purely deontic conception of sin and, as a result, they fail to address sin as a relational and ontological problem. In part two we (...)
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  7.  81
    Defending Realism: Ontological and Epistemological Investigations.Guido Bonino, Greg Jesson & Javier Cumpa (eds.) - 2014 - Boston: De Gruyter.
    The essays collected in this volume explore the fundamental issues of philosophical realism, including metaphysical realism. Do things exist and have properties independently of being objects of thought or perception? epistemological realism: Is it possible to know any part of reality in and of itself? and ontological realism: Are there universals?
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  8. Tarski's Nominalism.Greg Frost-Arnold - 2008 - In Douglas Patterson (ed.), New essays on Tarski and philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Alfred Tarski was a nominalist. But he published almost nothing on his nominalist views, and until recently the only sources scholars had for studying Tarski’s nominalism were conversational reports from his friends and colleagues. However, a recently-discovered archival resource provides the most detailed information yet about Tarski’s nominalism. Tarski spent the academic year 1940-41 at Harvard, along with many of the leading lights of scientific philosophy: Carnap, Quine, Hempel, Goodman, and (for the fall semester) Russell. This group met frequently to (...)
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  9. Envelopes and indifference.Graham Priest & Greg Restall - unknown
    Consider this situation: Here are two envelopes. You have one of them. Each envelope contains some quantity of money, which can be of any positive real magnitude. One contains twice the amount of money that the other contains, but you do not know which one. You can keep the money in your envelope, whose numerical value you do not know at this stage, or you can exchange envelopes and have the money in the other. You wish to maximise your money. (...)
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  10. Introduction : rhetoric/memory/place.Carole Blair, Greg Dickinson & Brian L. Ott - 2010 - In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
     
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  11. Crises alimentaires et économiques en amérique, en afrique, au moyen-orient et en asie: Entre luttes et résignation.Marie-Noëlle Abi-Yaghi, Greg Albo, Kako Nubukpo, Rhina Roux & Young-Woo Son - 2010 - Actuel Marx 47 (1):12-26.
    Food Problems and Economic Problems in America, Africa, the Middle East and Asia : Struggles and Resignation What are the various dynamics of crisis, revolt, and resignation currently operating on the American and African continents, in the Middle East and in Asia. What effects do they have on the policies adopted to “get out of the crisis”? These are the issues which Greg Albo, Kako Nubukpo, Rhina Roux, Marie Noëlle Abiyaghi and Son Youg Woo address in this article. They (...)
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  12.  43
    Reframing the New Topographics.Greg Foster-Rice & John Rohrbach (eds.) - 2010 - Center for American Places.
    In 1975 the exhibition New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape crystallized a new view of the American West: the sublime “American” vistas of Ansel Adams were replaced and subverted by images of a landscape inundated with banal symbols of humanity. Organized by William Jenkins for the George Eastman House in Rochester, New York, New Topographics showcased such photographers as Robert Adams, Lewis Baltz, Joe Deal, Frank Gohlke. Their pictures, illustrating the vernacular, human-made world of contemporary America, punctured the myth (...)
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  13.  22
    A Hard-Water World: Ice Fishing and Why We Do It.Layne Kennedy & Greg Breining - 2008 - Minnesota Historical Society Press.
    Striking photographs by Kennedy and engaging essays by outdoor writer and fisherman Breining capture the quirky world of ice fishing--its natural beauty and solitary subzero vigils, along with its oddball practices and practitioners.
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  14.  74
    Fitting the Fractional Polynomial Model to Non-Gaussian Longitudinal Data.Ji Hoon Ryoo, Jeffrey D. Long, Greg W. Welch, Arthur Reynolds & Susan M. Swearer - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  15. LOGIC Greg Restall i.Greg Restall - 2003 - In John Shand (ed.), Fundamentals of Philosophy. New York: Routledge. pp. 64.
  16.  31
    Assessing Managers’ Ethical Decision-making: An Objective Measure of Managerial Moral Judgment.Greg E. Loviscky, Linda K. Treviño & Rick R. Jacobs - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (3):263-285.
    Recent allegations of unethical decision-making by leaders in prominent business organizations have jeopardized the world's confidence in American business. The purpose of this research was to develop a measure of managerial moral judgment that can be used in future research and managerial assessment. The measure was patterned after the Defining Issues Test, a widely used general measure of moral judgment. With content validity as the goal, we aimed to sample the domain of managerial ethical situations by establishing links to dimensions (...)
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  17. Computer simulation and the features of novel empirical data.Greg Lusk - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:145-152.
    In an attempt to determine the epistemic status of computer simulation results, philosophers of science have recently explored the similarities and differences between computer simulations and experiments. One question that arises is whether and, if so, when, simulation results constitute novel empirical data. It is often supposed that computer simulation results could never be empirical or novel because simulations never interact with their targets, and cannot go beyond their programming. This paper argues against this position by examining whether, and under (...)
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  18. Multiple Conclusions.Greg Restall - 2005 - In Petr Hájek, Luis Valdés-Villanueva & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science. College Publications.
    Our topic is the notion of logical consequence: the link between premises and conclusions, the glue that holds together deductively valid argument. How can we understand this relation between premises and conclusions? It seems that any account begs questions. Painting with very broad brushtrokes, we can sketch the landscape of disagreement like this: “Realists” prefer an analysis of logical consequence in terms of the preservation of truth [29]. “Anti-realists” take this to be unhelpful and o:er alternative analyses. Some, like Dummett, (...)
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  19.  21
    Evolution of Students’ Varied Conceptualizations About Socially Responsible Engineering: A Four Year Longitudinal Study.Greg Rulifson & Angela R. Bielefeldt - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (3):939-974.
    Engineers should learn how to act on their responsibility to society during their education. At present, however, it is unknown what students think about the meaning of socially responsible engineering. This paper synthesizes 4 years of longitudinal interviews with engineering students as they progressed through college. The interviews revolved broadly around how students saw the connections between engineering and social responsibility, and what influenced these ideas. Using the Weidman Input–Environment–Output model as a framework, this research found that influences included required (...)
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  20.  23
    EEG-Based Neurocognitive Metrics May Predict Simulated and On-Road Driving Performance in Older Drivers.Greg Rupp, Chris Berka, Amir H. Meghdadi, Marija Stevanović Karić, Marc Casillas, Stephanie Smith, Theodore Rosenthal, Kevin McShea, Emily Sones & Thomas D. Marcotte - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  21.  45
    An Introduction to Substructural Logics.Greg Restall - 1999 - New York: Routledge.
    This book introduces an important group of logics that have come to be known under the umbrella term 'susbstructural'. Substructural logics have independently led to significant developments in philosophy, computing and linguistics. _An Introduction to Substrucural Logics_ is the first book to systematically survey the new results and the significant impact that this class of logics has had on a wide range of fields.The following topics are covered: * Proof Theory * Propositional Structures * Frames * Decidability * Coda Both (...)
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  22.  23
    Political Legitimacy in the Democratic View: The Case of Climate Services.Greg Lusk - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (5):991-1002.
    Wendy S. Parker and I have advanced an inductive-risk approach to the provision of climate information that relies on the contextual values of information users. This approach aims to improve the e...
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  23.  38
    Does democracy require value-neutral science? Analyzing the legitimacy of scientific information in the political sphere.Greg Lusk - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 90 (C):102-110.
  24.  71
    Saving the Data.Greg Lusk - 2021 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 72 (1):277-298.
    Three decades ago, James Bogen and James Woodward argued against the possibility and usefulness of scientific explanations of data. They developed a picture of scientific reasoning where stable phenomena were identified via data without much input from theory. Rather than explain data, theories ‘save the phenomena’. In contrast, I argue that there are good reasons to explain data, and the practice of science reveals attempts to do so. I demonstrate that algorithms employed to address inverse problems in remote-sensing applications should (...)
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  25. Curry's revenge: the costs of non-classical solutions to the paradoxes of self-reference.Greg Restall - 2007 - In J. C. Beall (ed.), Revenge of the liar: new essays on the paradox. New York: Oxford University Press.
    The paradoxes of self-reference are genuinely paradoxical. The liar paradox, Russell’s paradox and their cousins pose enormous difficulties to anyone who seeks to give a comprehensive theory of semantics, or of sets, or of any other domain which allows a modicum of self-reference and a modest number of logical principles. One approach to the paradoxes of self-reference takes these paradoxes as motivating a non-classical theory of logical consequence. Similar logical principles are used in each of the paradoxical inferences. If one (...)
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  26.  50
    The Ethics of Health Care Rationing: An Introduction.Greg Bognar & Iwao Hirose - 2014 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Iwao Hirose.
    Should organ transplants be given to patients who have waited the longest, or need it most urgently, or those whose survival prospects are the best? The rationing of health care is universal and inevitable, taking place in poor and affluent countries, in publicly funded and private health care systems. Someone must budget for as well as dispense health care whilst aging populations severely stretch the availability of resources. The Ethics of Health Care Rationing is a clear and much-needed introduction to (...)
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  27.  39
    David Hume and Public Debt: Crying Wolf?Greg Coolidge - 1994 - Hume Studies 20 (1):143-149.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Hume Studies Volume XX, Number 1, April 1994, pp. 143-149 David Hume and Public Debt: Crying Wolf? JOHN CHRISTIAN LAURSEN and GREG COOLIDGE David Hume's views on public credit have not only received prominent attention in the literature on his political thought, but have even been the subject of attention in The Wall Street Journal.1 Most of the attention has centered on Hume's essay "Of Public Credit" of (...)
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  28.  19
    Logic: an introduction.Greg Restall - 2006 - New York: Routledge.
    Propositional logic -- Propositions and arguments -- Connectives and argument forms -- Truth tables -- Trees -- Vagueness and bivalence -- Conditionality -- Natural deduction -- Predicate logic -- Predicates, names, and quantifiers -- Models for predicate logic -- Trees for predicate logic -- Identity and functions -- Definite descriptions -- Some things do not exist -- What is a predicate? -- What is logic?
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  29. Is disability mere difference?Greg Bognar - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):46-49.
    Some philosophers and disability advocates argue that disability is not bad for you. Rather than treated as a harm, it should be considered and even celebrated as just another manifestation of human diversity. Disability is mere difference. To most of us, these are extraordinary claims. Can they be defended?
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  30. A unified analysis of the English bare plural.Greg N. Carlson - 1977 - Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (3):413 - 456.
    It is argued that the English bare plural (an NP with plural head that lacks a determiner), in spite of its apparently diverse possibilities of interpretation, is optimally represented in the grammar as a unified phenomenon. The chief distinction to be dealt with is that between the generic use of the bare plural (as in Dogs bark) and its existential or indefinite plural use (as in He threw oranges at Alice). The difference between these uses is not to be accounted (...)
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  31. Arithmetic and Truth in Łukasiewicz’s Infinitely Valued Logic.Greg Restall - 1992 - Logique Et Analyse 139 (140):303-312.
     
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  32. Integrity and moral danger.Greg Scherkoske - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):335-358.
    While it isn't clear that we are right to value integrity — or so I shall argue — most of us do. Persons of integrity merit respect. Compromising one's integrity — or failing completely to exhibit it — seems a serious flaw. Two influential accounts suggest why. For Bernard Williams, integrity is 'a person's sticking by what [she] regards as ethically necessary or worthwhile.'2 To this Cheshire Calhoun adds a helpful negative gloss:To lack integrity is to underrate both formulating and (...)
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  33.  73
    Watkins and the pragmatic problem of induction.Greg Bamford - 1989 - Analysis 49 (4):203-205.
    Watkins proposes a neo-Popperian solution to the pragmatic problem of induction. He asserts that evidence can be used non-inductively to prefer the principle that corroboration is more successful over all human history than that, say, counter-corroboration is more successful either over this same period or in the future. Watkins's argument for rejecting the first counter-corroborationist alternative is beside the point. However, as whatever is the best strategy over all human history is irrelevant to the pragmatic problem of induction since we (...)
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  34. Re-Reading-Amartya Sen,'The Impossibility of a Paretian Liberal'(1970).Greg Fried - 2011 - Philosophical Papers 40 (1):129.
     
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  35.  6
    Is Intentionality More Like Hunting or More Like Hitting? Gustav Bergmann on Skepticism and Knowledge.Greg Jesson - 2008 - In Guido Bonino & Rosaria Egidi (eds.), Fostering the Ontological Turn: Gustav Bergmann (1906-1987). Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag. pp. 125-146.
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  36. A critique of dialetheism.Greg Littman & Keith Simmons - 2004 - In Graham Priest, Jc Beall & Bradley P. Armour-Garb (eds.), The law of non-contradiction : new philosophical essays. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-226.
    This dissertation is a critical examination of dialetheism, the view that there are true contradictions. Dialetheism's proponents argue that adopting the view will allow us to solve hitherto unsolved problems, including the well-known logical paradoxes. ;Dialetheism faces three kinds of challenge. Challenges of the first kind put in doubt the intrinsic coherence of dialetheism. It can be claimed, for example, that it is incoherent for a claim to be both true and false; that claims known to be false cannot be (...)
     
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  37.  22
    Structural Rules in Natural Deduction with Alternatives.Greg Restall - 2023 - Bulletin of the Section of Logic 52 (2):109-143.
    Natural deduction with alternatives extends Gentzen–Prawitz-style natural deduction with a single structural addition: negatively signed assumptions, called alternatives. It is a mildly bilateralist, single-conclusion natural deduction proof system in which the connective rules are unmodi_ed from the usual Prawitz introduction and elimination rules — the extension is purely structural. This framework is general: it can be used for (1) classical logic, (2) relevant logic without distribution, (3) affine logic, and (4) linear logic, keeping the connective rules fixed, and varying purely (...)
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  38.  36
    Just choice: a Danielsian analysis of the aims and scope of prenatal screening for fetal abnormalities.Greg Stapleton, Wybo Dondorp, Peter Schröder-Bäck & Guido de Wert - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (4):545-555.
    Developments in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) and cell-free fetal DNA analysis raise the possibility that antenatal services may soon be able to support couples in non-invasively testing for, and diagnosing, an unprecedented range of genetic disorders and traits coded within their unborn child’s genome. Inevitably, this has prompted debate within the bioethics literature about what screening options should be offered to couples for the purpose of reproductive choice. In relation to this problem, the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) and (...)
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  39. Methods and metaphors in community ecology: The problem of defining stability.Greg Mikkelson - manuscript
    Scientists must sometimes choose between competing definitions of key terms. The degree to which different definitions facilitate important dis- coveries should ultimately guide decisions about which terms to accept. In the short run, rules of thumb can help. One such rule is to regard with suspicion any definition that turns a seemingly important empiri- cal matter into an a priori exercise. Several prominent definitions of eco- logical “stability” are suspect, according to this rule. After evaluating alternatives, I suggest that the (...)
     
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  40.  48
    A partnership model of corporate ethics.Greg Wood - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 40 (1):61 - 73.
    The stock market crash of 1987 had a profound effect on corporate Australia and the Australian community in general. The fall-out revealed that some of our most respected business figures had not been as ethical, or even as lawful, as we would have hoped. This impropriety produced in Australia an awakening to business ethics. Whilst many companies endeavoured to introduce ethical practices into their corporations, they perceived ethics as a way of minimising damage to the corporation and in some cases (...)
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  41.  41
    Meaning for Radical Contextualists: Travis and Gadamer on Why Words Matter.Greg Lynch - 2017 - Philosophical Investigations 41 (1):22-41.
    Charles Travis and Hans-Georg Gadamer both affirm radical contextualism, the view that natural language is ineliminably context-sensitive. However, they offer different accounts of the role linguistic meaning plays in determining the contents of utterances. I discuss the differences between Travis's and Gadamer's views of meaning and offer an argument in favour of the latter. I argue that Travis's view assumes a principled distinction between literal and figurative speech that is at odds with his wider contextualist commitments. By contrast, Gadamer's view, (...)
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  42.  72
    Truth Values and Proof Theory.Greg Restall - 2009 - Studia Logica 92 (2):241-264.
    I present an account of truth values for classical logic, intuitionistic logic, and the modal logic S5, in which truth values are not a fundamental category from which the logic is defined, but rather, an idealisation of more fundamental logical features in the proof theory for each system. The result is not a new set of semantic structures, but a new understanding of how the existing semantic structures may be understood in terms of a more fundamental notion of logical consequence.
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  43. A Critique of Dialetheism.Greg Littman & Keith Simmons - 2004 - In Graham Priest, Jc Beall & Bradley P. Armour-Garb (eds.), The law of non-contradiction : new philosophical essays. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-226.
    This dissertation is a critical examination of dialetheism, the view that there are true contradictions. Dialetheism's proponents argue that adopting the view will allow us to solve hitherto unsolved problems, including the well-known logical paradoxes. ;Dialetheism faces three kinds of challenge. Challenges of the first kind put in doubt the intrinsic coherence of dialetheism. It can be claimed, for example, that it is incoherent for a claim to be both true and false; that claims known to be false cannot be (...)
     
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  44.  7
    A Glorious Revolution.Greg Forster - 2004 - Political Theory 32 (5):706-713.
  45.  27
    New waves in philosophical logic.Greg Restall & Gillian Kay Russell (eds.) - 2012 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Series Editors' PrefaceAcknowledgementsNotes on ContributorsHow Things Are Elsewhere; W. Schwarz Information Change and First-Order Dynamic Logic; B.Kooi Interpreting and Applying Proof Theories for Modal Logic; F.Poggiolesi & G.Restall The Logic(s) of Modal Knowledge; D.Cohnitz On Probabilistically Closed Languages; H.Leitgeb Dogmatism, Probability and Logical Uncertainty; B.Weatherson & D.Jehle Skepticism about Reasoning; S.Roush, K.Allen & I.HerbertLessons in Philosophy of Logic from Medieval Obligations; C.D.Novaes How to Rule Out Things with Words: Strong Paraconsistency and the Algebra of Exclusion; (...)
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  46.  18
    A Useful Substructural Logic.Greg Restall - 1994 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 2 (2):137-148.
    Formal systems seem to come in two general kinds: useful and useless. This is painting things starkly, but the point is important. Formal structures can either be used in interesting and important ways, or they can languish unused and irrelevant. Lewis' modal logics are good examples. The systems S4 and S5 are useful in many different ways. They map out structures that are relevant to a number of different applications. S1, S2 and S3 however, are not so lucky. They are (...)
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  47.  75
    Fair Innings.Greg Bognar - 2014 - Bioethics 29 (4):251-261.
    In many societies, the aging of the population is becoming a major problem. This raises difficult issues for ethics and public policy. On what is known as the fair innings view, it is not impermissible to give lower priority to policies that primarily benefit the elderly. Philosophers have tried to justify this view on various grounds. In this article, I look at a consequentialist, a fairness-based, and a contractarian justification. I argue that all of them have implausible implications and fail (...)
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  48.  16
    An Ontology of Trash: The Disposable and its Problematic Nature.Greg Kennedy - 2007 - State University of New York Press.
    A philosophical exploration of the problematic nature of the disposable.
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  49.  55
    Implementing the ethos of corporate codes of ethics: Australia, Canada, and Sweden.Greg Wood, Göran Svensson, Jang Singh, Emily Carasco & Michael Callaghan - 2004 - Business Ethics 13 (4):389-403.
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  50. Truthmakers, entailment and necessity.Greg Restall - 1996 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (2):331 – 340.
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