Results for 'Gregory J. Whitwell'

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  1. Why Ethical Consumers Don’t Walk Their Talk: Towards a Framework for Understanding the Gap Between the Ethical Purchase Intentions and Actual Buying Behaviour of Ethically Minded Consumers.Michal J. Carrington, Benjamin A. Neville & Gregory J. Whitwell - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):139-158.
    Despite their ethical intentions, ethically minded consumers rarely purchase ethical products (Auger and Devinney: 2007, Journal of Business Ethics76, 361–383). This intentions–behaviour gap is important to researchers and industry, yet poorly understood (Belk et al.: 2005, Consumption, Markets and Culture8(3), 275–289). In order to push the understanding of ethical consumption forward, we draw on what is known about the intention–behaviour gap from the social psychology and consumer behaviour literatures and apply these insights to ethical consumerism. We bring together three separate (...)
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  2.  55
    Stakeholder Salience Revisited: Refining, Redefining, and Refueling an Underdeveloped Conceptual Tool. [REVIEW]Benjamin A. Neville, Simon J. Bell & Gregory J. Whitwell - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):357-378.
    This article revisits and further develops Mitchell et al.’s (Acad Manag Rev 22(4):853–886, 1997 ) theory of stakeholder identification and salience. Stakeholder salience holds considerable unrealized potential for understanding how organizations may best manage multiple stakeholder relationships. While the salience framework has been cited numerous times, attempts to develop it further have been relatively limited. We begin by reviewing the key contributions of other researchers. We then identify and seek to resolve three residual weaknesses in Mitchell et al.’s ( 1997 (...)
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  3.  15
    Handbook of the psychology of science.Gregory J. Feist & Michael E. Gorman (eds.) - 2013 - New York: Springer Pub. Company, LLC.
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  4. Introduction : another brick in the wall.Gregory J. Feist & Michael E. Gorman - 2013 - In Gregory J. Feist & Michael E. Gorman (eds.), Handbook of the psychology of science. New York: Springer Pub. Company, LLC.
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  5.  8
    Niebuhrian international relations: the ethics of foreign policymaking.Gregory J. Moore - 2020 - New York, New York: Oxford University Press.
    Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971) may have been the most influential and insightful American thinker of the twentieth century. In dealing with the intricacies of human nature, society, politics, ethics, theology, racism and international relations, Niebuhr the teacher, preacher, philosopher, social critic and ethicist, was highly influential and difficult to ignore during the Second World War and Cold War eras because of his intellectual heft and the novel manner in which he addressed the economic, spiritual, social and political problems of his time. (...)
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  6.  15
    Teachers' personal epistemologies: evolving models for informing practice.Gregory J. Schraw, Jo Brownlee & Lori Olafson (eds.) - 2017 - Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, Inc,..
    The focus of this book is to explore teachers' evolving personal epistemologies, or the beliefs we hold about the origin and development of knowledge in the context of teaching. The chapters focus on a range of conceptual frameworks about how university and field-based experiences influence the connections between teachers' personal epistemologies and teaching practice. In an earlier volume we investigated ways in which we might change preservice teachers' beliefs and teaching practice (Brownlee, Schraw and Berthelsen, 2011). While we addressed the (...)
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  7.  38
    A theory of eye movements during target acquisition.Gregory J. Zelinsky - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (4):787-835.
  8. Specifying the components of attention in a visual search task.Gregory J. Zelinsky - 2005 - In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. pp. 395--400.
  9.  72
    Exorcising the devil: Adding details to a descriptive account of oculomotor control.Gregory J. Zelinsky - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):703-704.
    Findlay & Walker give voice to several common lines of thought regarding oculomotor control but do not provide sufficient detail for a critical evaluation of their theory. I argue that arbitrary spatial and temporal saccade metrics can be produced simply by manipulating the initial activation values in their model – values that the authors never specify. This lack of detail makes it difficult to anticipate the model's specific oculomotor behavior, or to compare this behavior to models opting for a more (...)
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  10. Using eye movements to study working memory rehearsal for objects in visual scenes.Gregory J. Zelinsky & Lester C. Loschky - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 1312--1317.
     
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  11. Karl Jaspers's Philosophy: Expositions and Interpretations.Kurt Salamun & Gregory J. Walters (eds.) - 2006 - Amherst, N.Y.: Humanities Press.
    Karl Jaspers was one of the greatest European philosophers and humanists of the twentieth century. He demonstrated a broad range of philosophical thinking that makes his work relevant for the twenty-first century. Coming to philosophy from medicine and psychiatry, Jaspers's views encompass a vast and creative range of empirical, philosophical, social, historical, and poltical ideas. Hannah Arendt described Jaspers as one of the greatest interpreters of Kant in the German tradition. In the 1950s, Jaspers spoke of his "philosophy of reason" (...)
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  12.  78
    Emile Zuckerkandl, Linus Pauling, and the Molecular Evolutionary Clock, 1959–1965.Gregory J. Morgan - 1998 - Journal of the History of Biology 31 (2):155 - 178.
  13.  86
    A Critique of Hindriks’ Restructuring Searle’s Making the Social World.Gregory J. Lobo - 2015 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 45 (3):356-362.
    This article is a response to Frank Hindriks’ “Restructuring Searle’s Making the Social World.”.
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  14. Longitudinal Task-Related Functional Connectivity Changes Predict Reading Development.Gregory J. Smith, James R. Booth & Chris McNorgan - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  15. Computational complexity and Godel's incompleteness theorem.Gregory J. Chaitin - 1970 - [Rio de Janeiro,: Centro Técnico Científico, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro. Edited by Gregory J. Chaitin.
  16.  36
    Cancer Virus Hunters: A History of Tumor Virology.Gregory J. Morgan - 2022 - Baltimore, MD, USA: Jhu Press.
    "The author tells a history of the study of cancer-causing viruses from the early twentieth century to the development of an HPV vaccine for cervical cancer in 2006. He profiles the "cancer virus hunters" who made breakthroughs in tumor virology"--.
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  17. Conclusions and the future of the psychology of science.Michael E. Gorman & Gregory J. Feist - 2013 - In Gregory J. Feist & Michael E. Gorman (eds.), Handbook of the psychology of science. New York: Springer Pub. Company, LLC.
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  18. Human Rights and Status Functions, before and after the Enlightenment.Gregory J. Lobo - 2019 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 49 (1):31-41.
    This article discusses John Searle’s status function account of human rights and Åsa Burman’s “A Critique of the Status Function Account of Human Rights.” While recognizing the validity of part of the critique, based on the distinction between types and tokens, the author argues that, nonetheless, one is not compelled to accept Burman’s conclusion, that “one must give up the status function account of human rights to explain how a human right can exist without collective recognition”. Specifically, the author accepts (...)
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  19.  15
    A Survey of University Institutional Review Boards: Characteristics, Policies, and Procedures.Gregory J. Hayes, Steven C. Hayes & Thane Dykstra - 1995 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 17 (3):1.
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  20. Laws of biological design: A reply to John Beatty.Gregory J. Morgan - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):379-389.
    In this paper, I argue against John Beatty’s position in his paper “The Evolutionary Contingency Thesis” by counterexample. Beatty argues that there are no distinctly biological laws because the outcomes of the evolutionary processes are contingent. I argue that the heart of the Caspar–Klug theory of virus structure—that spherical virus capsids consist of 60T subunits (where T = k 2 + hk + h 2 and h and k are integers)—is a distinctly biological law even if the existence of spherical (...)
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  21. Two Psychological Defenses of Hobbes’s Claim Against the “Fool”.Gregory J. Robson - 2015 - Hobbes Studies 28 (2):132-148.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 132 - 148 A striking feature of Thomas Hobbes’s account of political obligation is his discussion of the Fool, who thinks it reasonable to adopt a policy of selective, self-interested covenant breaking. Surprisingly, scholars have paid little attention to the potential of a psychological defense of Hobbes’s controversial claim that the Fool behaves irrationally. In this paper, I first describe Hobbes’s account of the Fool and argue that the kind of Fool most worth (...)
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  22. Evolution without species: The case of mosaic bacteriophages.Gregory J. Morgan & W. Brad Pitts - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):745-765.
    College of Medicine, University of South Alabama Mobile, AL 36688-0002, USA wbp501{at}jaguar1.usouthal.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Recent work in viral genomics has shown that bacteriophages exhibit a high degree of mosaicism, which is most likely due to a long history of prolific horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Given these findings, we argue that each of the most plausible attempts to properly classify bacteriophages into distinct species fail. Mayr's biological species concept fails because there is (...)
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  23.  38
    What is a virus species? Radical pluralism in viral taxonomy.Gregory J. Morgan - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 59:64-70.
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  24.  23
    A century of controversy over the foundations of mathematics.Gregory J. Chaitin - 2000 - Complexity 5 (5):12-21.
  25.  20
    The United States as an Isolationist in Global Biomedical Ethics and Human Rights.Gregory J. Dober - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (4):62-64.
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  26.  40
    Goedel's Way: Exploits Into an Undecidable World.Gregory J. Chaitin - 2011 - Crc Press. Edited by Francisco Antônio Doria & Newton C. A. da Costa.
    This accessible book gives a new, detailed and elementary explanation of the Gödel incompleteness theorems and presents the Chaitin results and their relation to the da Costa-Doria results, which are given in full, but with no ...
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  27.  20
    Evolution without Species: The Case of Mosaic Bacteriophages.Gregory J. Morgan & W. Brad Pitts - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):745-765.
    Recent work in viral genomics has shown that bacteriophages exhibit a high degree of mosaicism, which is most likely due to a long history of prolific horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Given these findings, we argue that each of the most plausible attempts to properly classify bacteriophages into distinct species fail. Mayr's biological species concept fails because there is no useful viral analog to sexual reproduction. Phenetic species concepts fail because they obscure the mosaicism and the rich reticulated viral histories. Phylogenetic (...)
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  28. Reconsidering the Necessary Beings of Aquinas’s Third Way.Gregory J. Robson - 2012 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 4 (1):219--241.
    Surprisingly few articles have focused on Aquinas’s particular conception of necessary beings in the Third Way, and many scholars have espoused inaccurate or incomplete views of that conception. My aim in this paper is both to offer a corrective to some of those views and, more importantly, to provide compelling answers to the following two questions about the necessary beings of the Third Way. First, how exactly does Aquinas conceive of these necessary beings? Second, what does Aquinas seek to accomplish (...)
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  29.  42
    How to Object to the Profit System (and How Not To).Gregory J. Robson - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 188 (2):205-219.
    This article introduces the Normative Representativeness Requirement (NRR) on any moral objection to a decentralized, profit-oriented system of political economy. I develop and defend the NRR and then show why the most important recent critique of the profit system—which I call The Moderate Critique (developed by, for instance, Elizabeth Anderson)—fails to meet the NRR. This article also defends the radical claim that no objection to the profit system itself, rather than just key aspects or salient instances of it, succeeds in (...)
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  30.  20
    Prefrontal-amygdala interactions in the regulation of fear.Gregory J. Quirk - 2007 - In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press. pp. 27--46.
  31.  71
    Evaluating Maclaurin and Sterelny’s conception of biodiversity in cases of frequent, promiscuous lateral gene transfer.Gregory J. Morgan - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):603-621.
    The recent conception of biodiversity proposed by James Maclaurin and Sterelny was developed mostly with macrobiological life in mind. They suggest that we measure biodiversity by dividing life into natural units (typically species) and quantifying the differences among units using phenetic rather than phylogenetic measures of distance. They identify problems in implementing quantitative phylogenetic notions of difference for non-prokaryotic species. I suggest that if we focus on microbiological life forms that engage in frequent, promiscuous lateral gene transfer (LGT), and their (...)
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  32.  43
    From Magic to Science.J. C. Gregory - 1930 - Philosophy 5 (19):379-.
    The tomb of the ancient Pharaoh, Tut-ankh-Amen, was opened some years ago. Lord Carnarvon, who financed the investigations, died shortly after the opening. Lord Westbury fell to his death from the high window of a London flat on February 21, 1930. His son, the Hon. Richard Bethell, had been found dead in his room the previous November. He was secretary to Mr. Howard Carter, one discoverer of Tut-ankh-Amen’s tomb. Many persons who had been connected with the excavations had died previously—M. (...)
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  33.  19
    Adding Resolution to an Old Problem: Eye Movements as a Measure of Visual Search.Gregory J. Zelinsky1 Rajesh Pn Rao, Mary M. Hayhoe & Dana H. Ballard - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 57.
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  34. Resurrection Reconsidered: Thomas and John in Controversy.Gregory J. Riley - 1995
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  35. A better basis for liberal equality? Waldron's Locke and the Rawlsian alternative.Gregory J. Robson - 2012 - Locke Studies 12:149-182.
     
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  36.  30
    A Critique of Searle’s Linguistic Exceptionalism.Gregory J. Lobo - 2021 - Sage Publications Inc: Philosophy of the Social Sciences 51 (6):555-573.
    Philosophy of the Social Sciences, Volume 51, Issue 6, Page 555-573, December 2021. John Searle’s social ontology distinguishes between linguistic and non-linguistic institutional facts. He argues that every instance of the latter is created by declarative speech acts, while the former are exceptions to this far-reaching claim: linguistic phenomena are autonomous, their meaning is “built in,” and this is necessary, Searle argues, to avoid “infinite regress.” In this essay I analyze Searle’s arguments for this linguistic exceptionalism and reveal its flaws. (...)
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  37.  22
    Epistemic levels in argument: An analysis of university oceanography students' use of evidence in writing.Gregory J. Kelly & Allison Takao - 2002 - Science Education 86 (3):314-342.
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  38.  31
    Mobile Affects, Open Secrets, and Global Illiquidity: Pockets, Pools, and Plasma.Gregory J. Seigworth & Matthew Tiessen - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (6):47-77.
    This article will take up Deleuze and Guattari’s allusive yet insightful writings on ‘the secret’ by considering the secret across three intermingling registers or modulations: as content, as form, and as expression. Setting the secret in relation to evolving modes of technological mediation and sociality as respectively pocket, pooling, and plasma, the article works through a trio of examples in order to understand the contemporary movements of secrets: the memories of secrets evoked in an intimately interactive music video by the (...)
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  39.  16
    Equivalency of Care Difficult to Attain in U.S. Prisons.Gregory J. Dober - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (7):17-19.
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  40. pt. III. Folds. From affection to soul.Gregory J. Seigworth - 2005 - In Charles J. Stivale (ed.), Gilles Deleuze: Key Concepts. Ithaca: Routledge.
     
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  41. Pragmatism and tragedy, communication and hope: A summary story.Gregory J. Shepherd - 2001 - In David K. Perry (ed.), American Pragmatism and Communication Research. L. Erlbaum. pp. 241--254.
  42. The threat of comprehensive overstimulation in modern societies.Gregory J. Robson - 2017 - Ethics and Information Technology 19 (1):69-80.
    Members of modern, digital societies experience a tremendous number and diversity of stimuli from sources such as computers, televisions, other electronic media, and various forms of advertising. In this paper, I argue that the presence of a wide range of stimulating items in modern societies poses a special risk to the welfare of members of modern societies. By considering the set of modern stimuli in a more comprehensive way than normative theorists have done so far—as part of a complex system (...)
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  43.  13
    Concerns of old, revisited.Gregory J. Madden - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):543-544.
    Commentaries surrounding Skinner were re-examined and applied to Hull et al. Hull et al. were found to address many of these concerns by paying attention to neuroscience, by providing some discussion of the origins of behavior, and by forwarding a deterministic account that may prove as revolutionary as that of Copernicus and Darwin.
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  44.  52
    A response to Brown: The role of LAMP in content and assessment of teaching.Gregory J. Marchant, Melinda K. Schoenfeldt & James H. Powell - 2013 - Journal of Social Studies Research 37 (3):181-182.
  45.  28
    How to run algorithmic information theory on a computer:Studying the limits of mathematical reasoning.Gregory J. Chaitin - 1996 - Complexity 2 (1):15-21.
  46.  21
    The House and the Household.Gregory J. Cooper & Lawrence E. Hurd - 2019 - Philosophical Topics 47 (1):21-43.
    The concept of population is central to ecology, yet it has received little attention from philosophers of ecology. Furthermore, the work that has been done often recycles ideas that have been developed for evolutionary biology. We argue that ecological populations and evolutionary populations, though intimately related, are distinct, and that the distinction matters to practicing ecologists. We offer a definition of ecological population in terms of demographic independence, where changes in abundance are a function of birth and death processes alone. (...)
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  47. Consciousness and attention.Gregory J. DiGirolamo & Harry J. Griffin - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
     
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  48.  19
    The Logic of the Absurd (in Kierkegaard’s Concluding Unscientific).Gregory J. Schufreider - 1979 - Philosophy Research Archives 5:161-181.
    An attempt to argue that the introduction of the category of the absurd into Kierkegaard's discussion of truth as subjectivity in the Postscript is an altogether rigorous and logical move.
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  49.  11
    5 Ways to Save the Planet (in Your Spare Time).Gregory J. Schwartz - 2010 - Kendall Hunt Publishing Company.
  50.  20
    On Lawrence C. Becker’s “The Neglect of Virtue”.Gregory J. Robson - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):1151-1153.
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