Results for 'Gregory S. Watson'

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  1.  9
    Gregory S. Kavka 1947-1994.Gary Watson - 1995 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 68 (5):99 - 100.
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  2. John Gregory's Writings on Medical Ethics and Philosophy of Medicine.John Gregory & Laurence B. Mccullough - 1998
     
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  3. Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition . Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory.Baruch Spinoza, S. Shirley & Brad Gregory - 1989 - Brill.
    This new and complete translation of Spinoza's famous 17th-century work fills an important gap, not only for all scholars of Spinoza, but also for everyone interested in the relationship between Western philosophy and religion, and the history of biblical exegesis.
     
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  4.  26
    Comments on L. E. Krueger's "Disconfirming Evidence" of R. L. Gregory's Theory of Illusions.Richard L. Gregory - 1972 - Psychological Review 79 (6):540-541.
  5. The Relation of Philosophy to Science an Inaugural Lecture Delivered in the Convocation Hall of Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, on October 16th, 1872 /$Cby John Watson[REVIEW]John Watson - 1984
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  6.  47
    Should Philosophy Replace Religious Education? Reflections Following Brendan Larvor's Article ‘Tu Quoque, Archbishop’: Watson Philosophy and Religious Education.Brenda Watson - 2005 - Think 3 (9):7-12.
    In Think, Issue 7, Brendan Larvor took the Archbishop of Canterbury to task for suggesting that atheism and humanism should not be taught in schools alongside the major faiths. Here, Brenda Watson defends the Archbishop's position.
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  7.  68
    Moving Beyond Secularist/Religious Apartheid? – A Comment Following Paul Kurtz's Article ‘Morality is Natural’: Watson Moving Beyond Secularist/Religious Apartheid?Brenda Watson - 2009 - Think 8 (22):107-115.
    Paul Kurtz's article ‘Morality is natural’ in THINK 15 was most stimulating. It left me, however, somewhat dissatisfied. Whilst he is clearly right that that there is a fund of moral wisdom that has been developed by humankind, I question whether distancing morality from religion is the important priority for us today.
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  8.  12
    Natural History Collections as Inspiration for Technology.David W. Green, Jolanta A. Watson, Han‐Sung Jung & Gregory S. Watson - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (2):1700238.
    Living organisms are the ultimate survivalists, having evolved phenotypes with unprecedented adaptability, ingenuity, resourcefulness, and versatility compared to human technology. To harness these properties, functional descriptions and design principles from all sources of biodiversity information must be collated − including the hundreds of thousands of possible survival features manifest in natural history museum collections, which represent 12% of total global biodiversity. This requires a consortium of expert biologists from a range of disciplines to convert the observations, data, and hypotheses into (...)
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  9. Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions.John P. Holdren, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Gary Stahl, Berel Lang, Richard H. Popkin, Joseph Margolis, Patrick Morgan, John Hare, Russell Hardin, Richard A. Watson, Gregory S. Kavka, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Sidney Axinn, Terry Nardin, Douglas P. Lackey, Jefferson McMahan, Edmund Pellegrino, Stephen Toulmin, Dietrich Fischer, Edward F. McClennen, Louis Rene Beres, Arne Naess, Richard Falk & Milton Fisk - 1986 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The excellent quality and depth of the various essays make [the book] an invaluable resource....It is likely to become essential reading in its field.—CHOICE.
     
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  10. Quine's Naturalism: Language, Theory, and the Knowing Subject.Paul Gregory - 2008 - Continuum.
    W. V. Quine was the most important naturalistic philosopher of the twentieth century and a major impetus for the recent resurgence of the view that empirical science is our best avenue to knowledge. His views, however, have not been well understood. Critics charge that Quine’s naturalized epistemology is circular and that it cannot be normative. Yet, such criticisms stem from a cluster of fundamental traditional assumptions regarding language, theory, and the knowing subject – the very presuppositions that Quine is at (...)
     
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  11.  14
    A Comparison of Canadian and U.S. CSR Strategic Alliances, CSR Reporting, and CSR Performance: Insights Into Implicit–Explicit CSR.Linda Thorne, Lois S. Mahoney, Kristen Gregory & Susan Convery - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):85-98.
    We considered the question of how corporate social responsibility differs between Canada and the U.S. Prior research has identified that national institutional differences exist between the two countries [Freeman and Hasnaoui, J Business Ethics 100:419–443, 2011], which may be associated with variations in their respective CSR practices. Matten and Moon [Acad Manag Rev 33:404–424, 2008] suggested that cross-national differences in firms’ CSR are depicted by an implicit–explicit conceptual framework: explicit CSR practices are deliberate and more strategic than implicit CSR practices. (...)
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  12. Tradition(s) Ii: Hermeneutics, Ethics, and the Dispensation of the Good.Stephen H. Watson - 2001 - Indiana University Press.
    Tradition II Hermeneutics, Ethics, and the Dispensation of the Good Stephen H. Watson Examines concepts of tradition in 20th-century Continental philosophy. In Tradition II, Stephen H. Watson engages post-Kantian Continental philosophy in his continuing investigation into the concept of tradition which he began in his work, Tradition. According to Watson, the problem of tradition became explicit in 20th-century philosophy, and is especially apparent in the work of Heidegger, Gadamer, Husserl, Benjamin, Adorno, Levinas, Kristeva, and Derrida, among others. (...)
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  13.  28
    Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenological Itinerary From Body Schema to Situated Knowledge: On How We Are and How We Are Not to 'Sing the World,'.S. Watson - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2):525-550.
    This paper addresses a number of issues concerning both the status of phenomenology in the work of one of its classical expositors, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and the general relation between theoretical models and evidence in phenomenological accounts. In so doing, I will attempt to explain Merleau-Ponty’s departure from classical transcendental accounts in Husserl’s thought and why Merleau-Ponty increasingly elaborated on them through aesthetic rationality. The result is a phenomenology that no longer understands itself as foundational and no longer understands itself in (...)
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  14.  8
    “Einstein's Baby” Could Infer Intentionality.John S. Watson - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):719-720.
    Some implications of Tomasello et al.'s theory derive from incorporating a variant of a common assumption that humans are biologically adapted to take an intentional stance in relation to conspecifics. I argue that, rather than being cued, intentions and other dispositional states may be inferred logically from an evolved commitment to determinism and evidence of state-dependent behavior.
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  15. C. S. Lewis on Politics and the Natural Law.Justin Buckley Dyer & Micah J. Watson - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Conventional wisdom holds that C. S. Lewis was uninterested in politics and public affairs. The conventional wisdom is wrong. As Justin Buckley Dyer and Micah J. Watson show in this groundbreaking work, Lewis was deeply interested in the fundamental truths and falsehoods about human nature and how these conceptions manifest themselves in the contested and turbulent public square. Ranging from the depths of Lewis' philosophical treatments of epistemology and moral pedagogy to practical considerations of morals legislation and responsible citizenship, (...)
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  16. Malebranche's First and Last Critics: Simon Foucher and Dortius de Mairan.Richard A. Watson & Marjorie Grene (eds.) - 1995 - Southern Illinois University.
    In this engrossing double volume, the work and thought of Nicolas Malebranche is examined through the eyes of Simon Foucher and Dortous de Mairan. Part 1 consists of Richard A. Watson’s translation of the first published critique, by Simon Foucher, of Malebranche’s main philosophical work, _Of the Search for the Truth. _In the second part, Marjorie Grene presents a meticulous translation of the long correspondence between Malebranche and Jean-Jacques Dortous de Mairan that ended shortly before Malebranche’s death. Both (...) and Grene provide insightful introductions to their translations. The influence of the works of Malebranche has been extensive, as has the influence of the lesser works of his first critic, Simon Foucher. Although Foucher was a minor philosopher of the seventeenth century, he provided arguments that led to a crucial turning point in modern philosophy. Listened to with care and treated with respect by Leibniz, Foucher’s arguments were utilized by Bayle, Berkeley, and Hume toward the destruction not only of Cartesian metaphysics but of substance philosophy as well. In this translation of Foucher’s work, it is now possible for readers of Malebranche’s _Of the Search for the Truth _to evaluate the immediate response of a young philosopher about town to one of the most important philosophical works of his day. The correspondence between Jean-Jacques Dortous de Mairan, an obscure provincial, and Nicolas Malebranche has usually been viewed as a small addendum to the works of Malebranche. Marjorie Grene, however, in her translation of this correspondence, considers it not only a contribution to the Malebranchian corpus but also an example of a reaction to Spinoza. Born at Béziers in the south of France in 1678, Mairan went to Paris in 1698, where he studied mathematics with Malebranche. Their correspondence began four years later when Mairan returned to Béziers to accept a position with the local bishop. In his letters to Malebranche, Mairan reveals himself to be one of no more than a handful of known readers of Spinoza who, in the early eighteenth century, admitted fascination with Spinoza’s presentation of his thoroughly unorthodox God and his equally unorthodox nature. (shrink)
     
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  17.  23
    Philosophical Essays, Presented to John Watson.John Watson (ed.) - 1922 - Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press.
    A school of idealism: meditatio laici, by J. Cappon.--Beati possidentes, by R. M. Wenley.--Moral validity: a study in Platonism, by R. C. Lodge.--Plato and the poet's eidōla, by A. S. Ferguson.--Some reflections on Aristotle's theory of tragedy, by G. S. Brett.--The function of the phantasm in St. Thomas Aquinas, by H. Carr.--The development of the psychology of Maine de Biran, by N. J. Symons.--A plea for eclecticism, by H. W. Wright.--Some present-day tendencies in philosophy, by J. M. MacEachran.--Evolution and personality, (...)
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  18.  13
    The Lost Second Book of Aristotle's Poetics.Walter Watson - 2012 - University of Chicago Press.
    But he does not actually address any of those ideas. The surviving Poetics is incomplete. Until today. Here, Walter Watson offers a new interpretation of the lost second book of Aristotle's Poetics.
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  19.  4
    The Great Christianity's Role in the Rise of the Nazis Scandal.S. Paul Gregory - 2003 - Free Inquiry 23 (4):20.
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  20.  24
    Quantum Phase Space From Schwinger’s Measurement Algebra.P. Watson & A. J. Bracken - 2014 - Foundations of Physics 44 (7):762-780.
    Schwinger’s algebra of microscopic measurement, with the associated complex field of transformation functions, is shown to provide the foundation for a discrete quantum phase space of known type, equipped with a Wigner function and a star product. Discrete position and momentum variables label points in the phase space, each taking \(N\) distinct values, where \(N\) is any chosen prime number. Because of the direct physical interpretation of the measurement symbols, the phase space structure is thereby related to definite experimental configurations.
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  21.  9
    2. "A Harvest of Holiness": The Theology of Danielle Rose's Mysteries.Brad S. Gregory - 2005 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 8 (4).
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  22.  5
    “Seeing Clearly in Darkness”: Blindness as Insight in Proust'S in Search of Lost Time and Gide's Pastoral Symphony.Bruce S. Watson - 2002 - In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), The Visible and the Invisible in the Interplay Between Philosophy, Literature, and Reality. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 305--310.
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  23. The Idea of the American University.Bradley C. S. Watson (ed.) - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    As John Henry Newman reflected on 'The Idea of a University' more than a century and a half ago, Bradley C. S. Watson brings together some of the nation's most eminent thinkers on higher education to reflect on the nature and purposes of the American university today. Their mordant reflections paint a picture of the American university in crisis. This book is essential reading for thoughtful citizens, scholars, and educational policymakers.
     
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  24.  9
    Civil Rights and the Paradox of Liberal Democracy.Bradley C. S. Watson - 1999 - Lexington Books.
    In Civil Rights and the Paradox of Liberal Democracy, Bradley Watson demonstrates the paradox of liberal democracy: that its cornerstone principles of equality and freedom are principles inherently directed toward undermining it. Modernity, beyond bringing definition to political equality, unleashed a whirlwind of individualism, which feeds the soul's basic impulse to rule without limitationincluding the limitation of consent. Here Watson begins his analysis of the foundations of liberalism, looking carefully and critically at the moral and political philosophies that (...)
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  25.  20
    Flesh of My Flesh: The Ethics of Cloning Humans a Reader.Gregory E. Pence, George Annas, Stephen Jay Gould, George Johnson, Axel Kahn, Leon Kass, Philip Kitcher, R. C. Lewontin, Gilbert Meilaender, Timothy F. Murphy, National Bioethics Advisory Commission, Chief Justice John Roberts & James D. Watson - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Flesh of My Flesh is a collection of articles by today's most respected scientists, philosophers, bioethicists, theologians, and law professors about whether we should allow human cloning. It includes historical pieces to provide background for the current debate. Religious, philosophical, and legal points of view are all represented.
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  26. Lewis's Principle of Recombination: Reply to Efird and Stoneham.George Darby & Duncan Watson - 2010 - Dialectica 64 (3):435-445.
    According to Lewis's modal realism, all ways the world could be are represented by possible worlds, and all possible worlds represent some way the world could be. That there are just the right possible worlds to represent all and only the ways the world could be is to be guaranteed by the principle of recombination. Lewis sketches the principle (put roughly: anything can co-exist with anything else), but does not spell out a precise version that generates just the right possibilities. (...)
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  27. Slaves of the Passions? On Schroeder's New Humeanism. [REVIEW]Alex Gregory - 2009 - Ratio 22 (2):250-257.
  28.  63
    Heidegger's Phenomenology of Boredom, and the Scientific Investigation of Conscious Experience.Sue P. Stafford & Wanda Torres Gregory - 2006 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (2):155-169.
    This paper argues that Heidegger's phenomenology of boredom in The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics: World, Finitude, Solitude (1983) could be a promising addition to the ‘toolbox’ of scientists investigating conscious experience. We describe Heidegger's methodological principles and show how he applies these in describing three forms of boredom. Each form is shown to have two structural moments – being held in limbo and being left empty – as well as a characteristic relation to passing the time. In our conclusion, we (...)
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  29.  59
    Bhaṭṭa Rāmakaṇṭha’s Elaboration of Self-Awareness , and How It Differs From Dharmakīrti’s Exposition of the Concept.Alex Watson - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):297-321.
    The article considers what happened to the Buddhist concept of self-awareness ( svasaṃvedana ) when it was appropriated by Śaiva Siddhānta. The first section observes how it was turned against Buddhism by being used to attack the momentariness of consciousenss and to establish its permanence. The second section examines how self-awareness differs from I-cognition ( ahampratyaya ). The third section examines the difference between the kind of self-awareness elaborated by Rāmakaṇṭha (‘reflexive awareness’) and a kind elaborated by Dharmakīrti (‘intentional self-awareness’). (...)
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  30.  18
    Telling the Patient's Story: Using Theatre Training to Improve Case Presentation Skills.Rachel R. Hammer, Johanna D. Rian, Jeremy K. Gregory, J. Michael Bostwick, Candace Barrett Birk, Louise Chalfant, Paul D. Scanlon & Daniel K. Hall-Flavin - 2011 - Medical Humanities 37 (1):18-22.
    A medical student's ability to present a case history is a critical skill that is difficult to teach. Case histories presented without theatrical engagement may fail to catch the attention of their intended recipients. More engaging presentations incorporate ‘stage presence’, eye contact, vocal inflection, interesting detail and succinct, well organised performances. They convey stories effectively without wasting time. To address the didactic challenge for instructing future doctors in how to ‘act’, the Mayo Medical School and The Mayo Clinic Center for (...)
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  31.  27
    The Self as a Dynamic Constant. Rāmakaṇṭha’s Middle Ground Between a Naiyāyika Eternal Self-Substance and a Buddhist Stream of Consciousness-Moments.Alex Watson - 2014 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (1):173-193.
    The paper gives an account of Rāmakaṇṭha’s (950–1000) contribution to the Buddhist–Brāhmaṇical debate about the existence or non-existence of a self, by demonstrating how he carves out middle ground between the two protagonists in that debate. First three points of divergence between the Brāhmaṇical (specifically Naiyāyika) and the Buddhist conceptions of subjectivity are identified. These take the form of Buddhist denials of, or re-explanations of (1) the self as the unitary essence of the individual, (2) the self as the substance (...)
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  32.  17
    Censorship and Cultural Change in Late-Medieval England: Vernacular Theology, the Oxford Translation Debate, and Arundel's Constitutions of 1409.Nicholas Watson - 1995 - Speculum 70 (4):822-864.
    The year 1400 is one of those loudly proclaimed milestones in English literary history in which the vagaries of human life and human chronological systems appear to come together with unusual appropriateness. The year not only of a new century's beginning but of the death of the old century's most important poet, 1400 has often been taken by Middle English scholars to mark one of those crucial transitions between an age of gold and one of brass: between the Age of (...)
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  33.  30
    Comments on Michael Slote's Moral Sentimentalism.Lori Watson - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):142-147.
    I present two challenges to the theory of moral sentimentalism that Michael Slote defends in his book. The first challenge aims to show that there are cases in which we empathize with an agent and yet judge her actions to be morally wrong. If such cases are plausible, then we have good reason to doubt Slote's claim that moral judgments are an affective attitude of warmth or chill and, thus, are purely sentiments. The second challenge is more of a suggestion. (...)
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  34.  24
    Philosophy and Children’s Religious Experience.Maughn Gregory - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:125-135.
    Philosophy serves to determine and clarifying the meaning of experience, and to make experience more meaningful, in both of the senses that Dewey distinguished: to broaden the range and amplify the value of qualities we experience, and to multiply their relevant ties to other experiences. Children’s experience is replete with philosophical meaning, and in facilitating children’s search for meaning, we are obliged to lead them in the directions that we ourselves have found most fruitful, though we should avoid the “adultist (...)
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  35.  11
    Tradition(S): Refiguring Community and Virtue in Classical German Thought.Stephen H. Watson - 1997 - Indiana University Press.
    Tradition(s) accomplishes this through a series of original readings of Kant and post-Kantian German philosophy, in which topics such as Kant on friendship, nature in post-Kantian thought, HeideggerÕs relationship to Hobbes, and HegelÕs ...
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  36.  46
    Cartesian Logic: An Essay on Descartes's Conception of Inference.Richard A. Watson - 1990 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (1):140-141.
    Descartes' conception of facultive inference is of a simple, primitive, unanalyzable, unmediated, unjustifiable "mental operation by which one grasps connections between one's ideas," in contrast to Aristotle's discursive inference consisting in "spelling out and analyzing its steps". Gaukroger shows why Descartes takes Aristotelian syllogistic to be merely presentative of material already known, and thus takes deduction to be only a way of ordering and displaying this knowledge. For Descartes, only synthesis leads to new knowledge. Thus it is a mistake to (...)
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  37.  10
    Irony and Inspiration: Homer as the Test of Plato’s Philosophical Coherence in the Sixth Essay of Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic.Daniel James Watson - 2017 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 11 (2):149-172.
    _ Source: _Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 149 - 172 Even among sympathetic readers, there abides a sense that Proclus’ attachment to his authorities at least partially blinds him to Socratic irony. This has serious implications for his conciliation of Homer and Plato in the Sixth Essay of his _Commentary on the Republic_. A significant number of the passages in Plato’s dialogues, which Proclus takes as necessitating their agreement, appear to be examples of Socrates’ ironic mode. If this apparent necessity (...)
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  38.  37
    The Political Philosophy of Walzer's Social Criticism.J. Gregory - 2010 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):1093-1111.
    This article calls for a critical re-evaluation of Walzer’s theory of justice. It argues that there is a deep tension between Walzer’s social criticism and his complex equality. Social criticism is based on the normative value of a connected and ‘whole’ self, and complex equality is based upon a value pluralism that threatens to fragment this sense of wholeness. Walzer therefore commissions a tacit premise, borrowing from the same ‘political philosophy’ that he explicitly repudiates, and which social criticism is intended (...)
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  39.  15
    The Composition of Julian of Norwich's Revelation of Love.Nicholas Watson - 1993 - Speculum 68 (3):637-683.
    Julian of Norwich's Revelation of Love is an exploratory account of supernatural events she experienced in May 1373, when she was thirty years old. Lying ill in bed, apparently near death, she suddenly began to see, reflected in a crucifix being held before her face, a series of details from Christ's Passion: his blood, flowing down from under the crown of thorns ; his body, buffeted by unseen agencies ; the drying of his facial skin as he hung on the (...)
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  40.  13
    Plato’s Symposium.Gerard Watson - 1971 - Philosophical Studies 20:280-281.
    Mommsen is reputed to have said: ‘In spite of his beautiful style, Renan was a true scholar’. Books on the Symposium are rare, perhaps because it is thought that its beauty takes from its philosophical earnestness. Rosen’s work is all the more welcome for that reason, but he also manages to throw light on much else in Plato’s thought. He tries to show that the cliché about Plato’s style being an important part of his meaning is to be taken seriously. (...)
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  41.  24
    Aristotle’s Concept of Matter.Gerard Watson - 1971 - Philosophical Studies 20:175-184.
    THE most influential figure in Aristotelian scholarship in modern times was undoubtedly Werner Jaeger. There had been great original thinkers about Aristotle in the hundred years before Jaeger: one need only mention Brandis in Germany and Case in England. There were also fine scholars contemporary with Jaeger, like Sir David Ross, the editor and commentator on Aristotle. But no Aristotelian scholar made such an impact as Jaeger. His arguments for Aristotle’s development, for his declining Platonism and growing empiricism, started a (...)
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  42.  5
    Montaigne's of Cruelty and the Emergence of Hermeneutic and Intercultural Modernity: Three Rival Readings.Stephen H. Watson - 2015 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 42 (1-2):62-85.
    While classical interpretations of hermeneutics have often identified themselves with Montaigne, others have contested not only whether Montaigne is committed to an account of a hermeneutic self, but whether a hermeneutics of traditional or self-identity is either possible or desirable. This article will investigate the continuing viability of hermeneutics through contested interpretations of Montaigne undertaken from the varying standpoints of phenomenology, psychoanalysis, and critical theory. These interpretations have shed significant light on Montaigne's work and have in turn been further illuminated (...)
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  43.  4
    Aristotle’s Concept of Matter.Gerard Watson - 1971 - Philosophical Studies 20:175-184.
    THE most influential figure in Aristotelian scholarship in modern times was undoubtedly Werner Jaeger. There had been great original thinkers about Aristotle in the hundred years before Jaeger: one need only mention Brandis in Germany and Case in England. There were also fine scholars contemporary with Jaeger, like Sir David Ross, the editor and commentator on Aristotle. But no Aristotelian scholar made such an impact as Jaeger. His arguments for Aristotle’s development, for his declining Platonism and growing empiricism, started a (...)
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  44.  4
    Plato’s Symposium. [REVIEW]Gerard Watson - 1971 - Philosophical Studies 20:280-281.
    Mommsen is reputed to have said: ‘In spite of his beautiful style, Renan was a true scholar’. Books on the Symposium are rare, perhaps because it is thought that its beauty takes from its philosophical earnestness. Rosen’s work is all the more welcome for that reason, but he also manages to throw light on much else in Plato’s thought. He tries to show that the cliché about Plato’s style being an important part of his meaning is to be taken seriously. (...)
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  45. Edward R. Murrow's This I Believe: Selections From the 1950s Radio Series.Dan Gediman, John Gregory, Mary Jo Gediman & Viki Merrick (eds.) - 2010 - This I Believe.
    This is a collection of fifty essays featured in Edward R. Murrow's 1950s This I Believe radio series. It includes such celebrities of the twentieth century as Pearl Buck, Norman Cousins, Margaret Mead, James Michener, Jackie Robinson, and Harry Truman. With an introduction by Edward R. Murrow and a foreword by Dan Gediman, executive producer of the contemporary This I Believe radio broadcasts, heard weekly on public radio.
     
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  46. Language, Theory, and the Human Subject: Understanding Quine's Natural Epistemology.Paul A. Gregory - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago
    The natural epistemology of W. V. Quine has not been well understood. Critics argue that Quine's scientific approach to epistemology is circular and fails to be normative, yet these criticisms tend to be based on the very presuppositions concerning language, theory, and epistemology that Quine is at pains to reject or alter. ;Quine's views on the meaningfulness of language use imply a breakdown in the dichotomy between language as a theoretically neutral instrument and theory as the commitment to some subset (...)
     
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  47. Descartes's Ballet: His Doctrine of the Will and His Political Philosophy.Richard A. Watson - 2007 - St. Augustine's Press.
    Transcript and English translation of La naissance de la paix -- Analysis of La naissance de la paix -- Did Descartes write La naissance de la paix? -- Descartes's doctrine of the will -- The power of the will -- Controlling bodily desires -- Willing the good -- The sources of willing -- Did Descartes read Corneille? -- Descartes's political philosophy -- Evidence and methods of construction -- The sovereign state -- Descartes's life and politics -- Discours de la methode (...)
     
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  48. The Self's Awareness of Itself: Bhaṭṭa Rāmakaṇṭha's Arguments Against the Buddhist Doctrine of No-Self.Alex Watson - 2006 - Sammlung de Nobili.
     
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  49. Book Review: What's in the Word: Rethinking the Socio-Rhetorical Character of the New TestamentWhat's in the Word: Rethinking the Socio-Rhetorical Character of the New Testament by WitheringtonBenIIIBaylor University Press, Waco, 2009. 195 Pp. $29.95. ISBN 978-1-60258-196-8. [REVIEW]Duane F. Watson - 2011 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 65 (3):314-314.
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  50. Wesley's Tercentenary and the State of Wesley Studies.Jeremy Gregory - 2003 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 85 (2):17-29.
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