9 found
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Gregory D. Saxton [8]Gregory Saxton [1]
  1.  11
    Do CSR Messages Resonate? Examining Public Reactions to Firms’ CSR Efforts on Social Media.Gregory D. Saxton, Lina Gomez, Zed Ngoh, Yi-Pin Lin & Sarah Dietrich - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):359-377.
    We posit a key goal of firms’ corporate social responsibility efforts is to influence reputation through carefully crafted communicative practices. This trend has accelerated with the rise of social media such as Twitter and Facebook, which are essentially public message networks that organizations are leveraging to engage with concerned audiences. Given the large number of messages sent on these sites, only some will be effective and achieve broad public resonance. Building on signaling theory, this paper asks whether and how messages (...)
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  2.  16
    Speaking Truth to Power: Twitter Reactions to the Panama Papers.Dean Neu, Gregory Saxton, Jeffery Everett & Abu Rahaman Shiraz - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):473-485.
    The current study examines the micro-linguistic details of Twitter responses to the whistleblower-initiated publication of the Panama Papers. The leaked documents contained the micro-details of tax avoidance, tax evasion, and wealth accumulation schemes used by business elites, politicians, and government bureaucrats. The public release of the documents on April 4, 2016 resulted in a groundswell of Twitter and other social media activity throughout the world, including 161,036 Spanish-language tweets in the subsequent 5-month period. The findings illustrate that the responses were (...)
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  3.  7
    Responding to Diffused Stakeholders on Social Media: Connective Power and Firm Reactions to CSR-Related Twitter Messages.Gregory D. Saxton, Charlotte Ren & Chao Guo - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (2):229-252.
    Social media offers a platform for diffused stakeholders to interact with firms—alternatively praising, questioning, and chastising businesses for their CSR performance and seeking to engage in two-way dialogue. In 2014, 163,402 public messages were sent to Fortune 200 firms’ CSR-focused Twitter accounts, each of which was either shared, replied to, “liked,” or ignored by the targeted firm. This paper examines firm reactions to these messages, building a model of firm response to stakeholders that combines the notions of CSR communication and (...)
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  4.  5
    Twitter-Based Social Accountability Processes: The Roles for Financial Inscriptions-Based and Values-Based Messaging.Gregory D. Saxton & Dean Neu - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    Social media is changing social accountability practices. The release of the Panama Papers on April 3, 2016 by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists unleashed a tsunami of over 5 million tweets decrying corrupt politicians and tax-avoiding business elites, calling for policy change from governments, and demanding accountability from corporate and private tax avoiders. The current study uses 297,000+ original English-language geo-codable tweets with the hashtags #PanamaGate, #PanamaPapers, or #PanamaLeaks to examine the trajectory of Twitter-based social accountability conversations and the (...)
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  5.  9
    The Relationship Between Sarbanes–Oxley Policies and Donor Advisories in Nonprofit Organizations.Gregory D. Saxton & Daniel G. Neely - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (2):333-351.
    This study examines the impact of Sarbanes–Oxley on the nonprofit sector. Focusing on three key SOX policies applicable to charities—conflict-of-interest policies, records retention policies, and whistleblower policies—this study tests the relationship between the existence and addition of these policies on subsequent ethical and governance lapses as reflected in the issuance of “donor advisories” by the large third-party ratings agency Charity Navigator. The findings suggest that, controlling for other relevant organizational factors, the three SOX-inspired written policies are related to a reduced (...)
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  6.  3
    Building Ethical Narratives: The Audiences for AICPA Editorials.Dean Neu & Gregory D. Saxton - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    This study examines how the American Institute of Certified Professional Accountants uses character and concept words to communicate normative narratives to different internal audiences. Our analysis of 552 editorials published in the AICPA’s Journal of Accountancy during the 1916–1973 period illustrates how the AICPA communicated similar yet different normative narratives to firm partners and students. During this time period, the centrality of ethically infused words such as ethics, conduct, and independence not only varied across different time periods but also across (...)
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  7. Correction: Social Accountability, Ethics, and the Occupy Wall Street Protests.Dean Neu, Gregory D. Saxton & Abu S. Rahaman - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-1.
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  8.  2
    Social Accountability, Ethics, and the Occupy Wall Street Protests.Dean Neu, Gregory D. Saxton & Abu S. Rahaman - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    This study examines the 3.5 m+ English-language original tweets that occurred during the 2011 Occupy Wall Street protests. Starting from previous research, we analyze how character terms such as “the banker,” “politician,” “the teaparty,” “GOP,” and “the corporation,” as well as concept terms such as “ethics,” “fairness,” “morals,” “justice,” and “democracy” were used by individual participants to respond to the Occupy Wall Street events. These character and concept terms not only allowed individuals to take an ethical stance but also accumulated (...)
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  9.  2
    Discussant Comment on “Is Tone at the Top Associated with Financial Reporting Aggressiveness?” by Lorenzo Patelli, Matteo Pedrini.Gregory D. Saxton - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (1):21-24.
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