Results for 'Gregory W. Parker'

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  1.  29
    Reformation or Revolution? Herman Bavinck and Henri de Lubac on Nature and Grace.Gregory W. Parker - 2017 - Perichoresis 15 (3):81-95.
    Henri de Lubac’s treatment of the relationship between nature and grace will be critiqued by Herman Bavinck’s ‘grace restores nature’ theme. In two significant addresses, Bavinck critiqued a Roman Catholic approach to nature and grace. De Lubac’s influence upon Roman Catholic thinking addressing nature and grace occurred post-Bavinck and has altered Catholic thinking on the subject. Neo-Calvinist scholar, Wolter Huttinga admits that Bavinck and de Lubac offer similar critiques of Roman Catholicism. The question remains then, do Bavinck’s critiques still hold? (...)
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  2.  85
    Successful Psychopaths: Are They Unethical Decision-Makers and Why?Gregory W. Stevens, Jacqueline K. Deuling & Achilles A. Armenakis - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):139-149.
    Successful psychopaths, defined as individuals in the general population who nevertheless possess some degree of psychopathic traits, are receiving increasing amounts of empirical attention. To date, little is known about such individuals, specifically with regard to how they respond to ethical dilemmas in business contexts. This study investigated this relationship, proposing a mediated model in which the positive relationship between psychopathy and unethical decision-making is explained through the process of moral disengagement, defined as a cognitive orientation that facilitates unethical choice. (...)
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  3. Belief is Not the Issue: A Defence of Inference to the Best Explanation.Gregory W. Dawes - 2013 - Ratio 26 (1):62-78.
    Defences of inference to the best explanation (IBE) frequently associate IBE with scientific realism, the idea that it is reasonable to believe our best scientific theories. I argue that this linkage is unfortunate. IBE does not warrant belief, since the fact that a theory is the best available explanation does not show it to be (even probably) true. What IBE does warrant is acceptance: taking a proposition as a premise in theoretical and/or practical reasoning. We ought to accept our best (...)
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  4.  32
    Theism and Explanation.Gregory W. Dawes - 2009 - Routledge.
    In this timely study, Dawes defends the methodological naturalism of the sciences. Though religions offer what appear to be explanations of various facts about the world, the scientist, as scientist, will not take such proposed explanations seriously. Even if no natural explanation were available, she will assume that one exists. Is this merely a sign of atheistic prejudice, as some critics suggest? Or are there good reasons to exclude from science explanations that invoke a supernatural agent? On the one hand, (...)
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  5.  28
    Identifying Pseudoscience: A Social Process Criterion.Gregory W. Dawes - 2018 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 49 (3):283-298.
    Many philosophers have come to believe there is no single criterion by which one can distinguish between a science and a pseudoscience. But it need not follow that no distinction can be made: a multifactorial account of what constitutes a pseudoscience remains possible. On this view, knowledge-seeking activities fall on a spectrum, with the clearly scientific at one end and the clearly non-scientific at the other. When proponents claim a clearly non-scientific activity to be scientific, it can be described as (...)
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  6. In Defense of Naturalism.Gregory W. Dawes - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (1):3-25.
    History and the modern sciences are characterized by what is sometimes called a methodological naturalism that disregards talk of divine agency. Some religious thinkers argue that this reflects a dogmatic materialism: a non-negotiable and a priori commitment to a materialist metaphysics. In response to this charge, I make a sharp distinction between procedural requirements and metaphysical commitments. The procedural requirement of history and the sciences—that proposed explanations appeal to publicly-accessible bodies of evidence—is non-negotiable, but has no metaphysical implications. The metaphysical (...)
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  7.  17
    A New Science of Religion.Gregory W. Dawes & James Maclaurin (eds.) - 2012 - Routledge.
    This volume examines the diversity of new scientific theories of religion, by outlining the logical and causal relationships between these enterprises.
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  8. What is Wrong with Intelligent Design?Gregory W. Dawes - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (2):69 - 81.
    While a great deal of abuse has been directed at intelligent design theory (ID), its starting point is a fact about biological organisms that cries out for explanation, namely "specified complexity" (SC). Advocates of ID deploy three kind of argument from specified complexity to the existence of a designer: an eliminative argument, an inductive argument, and an inference to the best explanation. Only the first of these merits the abuse directed at it; the other two arguments are worthy of respect. (...)
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  9. Supererogation, Wrongdoing, and Vice: On the Autonomy of the Ethics of Virtue.Gregory W. Trianosky - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):26-40.
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  10.  46
    Platforms for Cross-Sector Social Partnerships: Prospective Sensemaking Devices for Social Benefit. [REVIEW]John W. Selsky & Barbara Parker - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):21 - 37.
    Cross-sector social partnerships (CSSPs) can produce benefits at individual, organizational, sectoral and societal levels. In this article, we argue that the distribution of benefits depends in part on the cognitive frames held by partnership participants. Based on Selsky and Parker's (J Manage 31(6):849-873, 2005) review of CSSPs, we identify three analytic "platforms" for social partnerships — the resource-dependence platform, the social-issue platform, and the societal-sector platform. We situate platforms as prospective sensemaking devices that help project managers make sense of (...)
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  11.  59
    Defeating the Christian’s Claim to Warrant.Gregory W. Dawes & Jonathan Jong - 2012 - Philo 15 (2):127-144.
  12. Rightly Ordered Appetites: How to Live Morally and Live Well.Gregory W. Trianosky - 1988 - American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (1):1 - 12.
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  13.  22
    Using the Earthly City.Gregory W. Lee - 2016 - Augustinian Studies 47 (1):41-63.
    Augustine’s political theology is characterized by two apparently contradictory impulses: his harsh moral critique of non-Christian political communities, and his approbation of Christian participation in these communities. I argue that Augustine’s ecclesiology illuminates the coherence of his thought on these matters. Augustine’s assertion against the Donatists that Christians do not contract guilt from ecclesial fellowship with sinners reflects his larger vision of the relation between the earthly and heavenly cities. Association with sinners is no more avoidable in the civic sphere (...)
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  14.  52
    The Naturalism of the Sciences.Gregory W. Dawes & Tiddy Smith - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:22-31.
    The sciences are characterized by what is sometimes called a “methodological naturalism,” which disregards talk of divine agency. In response to those who argue that this reflects a dogmatic materialism, a number of philosophers have offered a pragmatic defense. The naturalism of the sciences, they argue, is provisional and defeasible: it is justified by the fact that unsuccessful theistic explanations have been superseded by successful natural ones. But this defense is inconsistent with the history of the sciences. The sciences have (...)
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  15. Rule-Utilitarianism and the Slippery Slope.Gregory W. Trianosky - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 75 (8):414-424.
    It is sometimes said that permitting, say, voluntary euthanasia would erode the motivations and inhibitions supporting other, legitimate prohibitions on killing to the point where widespread disregard for the moral law would result. this paper discusses the relevance of such "slippery slope" arguments for the rule-utilitarian who claims that we can assess moral rules by asking whether their acceptance would maximize utility. first it is argued that any normative theory of this type cannot recognize slope arguments as legitimate considerations in (...)
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  16. Can a Darwinian Be a Christian?Gregory W. Dawes - 2007 - Religion Compass 1 (6):711-24.
    A number of recent historians claim to have defeated what they call the ‘conflict thesis’, the idea that there exists some inevitable conflict between Darwinism and Christianity. This is often thought to be part of a broader ‘warfare thesis’, which posits an inevitable conflict between science and religion. But, all they have defeated is one, relatively uninteresting form of this thesis. There remain other forms of the conflict theses that remain entirely plausible, even in light of the historical record.
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  17.  77
    Moral Integrity and Moral Psychology: A Refutation of Two Accounts of the Conflict Between Utilitarianism and Integrity. [REVIEW]Gregory W. Trianosky - 1986 - Journal of Value Inquiry 20 (4):279-288.
  18.  9
    Supererogation, Wrongdoing, and Vice: On the Autonomy of the Ethics of Virtue.Gregory W. Trianosky - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):26-40.
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  19. On the Obligation to Be Virtuous: Shaftesbury and the Question, Why Be Moral?Gregory W. Trianosky - 1978 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (3):289-300.
  20. Parts and Wholes: The Human Microbiome, Ecological Ontology, and the Challenges of Community.Gregory W. Schneider & Russell Winslow - 2014 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (2):208-223.
    Starting in June 2012, a series of articles in the journal Nature and in the online journals of the Public Library of Science made public the first results of a massive, international collaborative scientific endeavor known as the “Human Microbiome Project” . This project, which is attempting to categorize the vast number of microbiological species and organisms that live in and on the “healthy” human body, raises important questions about what it means to be a whole individual organism, especially if (...)
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  21.  54
    Analyticity and Necessity in Leibniz.Gregory W. Fitch - 1979 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (1):29-42.
  22.  59
    Basic Beliefs and Christian Faith.Gregory W. Dawes - 2015 - Religious Studies 51 (1):61-74.
  23.  34
    Enacted Others: Specifying Goffman's Phenomenological Omissions and Sociological Accomplishments.Gregory W. H. Smith - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (4):397-415.
    Erving Goffman's distinctive contribution to an understanding of others was grounded in his information control and ritual models of the interaction process. This contribution centered on the forms of the interaction order rather than self-other relations as traditionally conceived in phenomenology. Goffman came to phenomenology as a sympathetic but critical outsider who sought resources for the sociological mining of the interaction order. His engagement with phenomenological thinkers (principally Gustav Ichheiser, Jean-Paul Sartre and Alfred Schutz) has to be understood in these (...)
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  24.  67
    Understanding Naturalism.Gregory W. Dawes - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):757-758.
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  25.  12
    Republics and Their Loves: Rereading City of God 191.Gregory W. Lee - 2011 - Modern Theology 27 (4):553-581.
    In City of God 19.24, Augustine rejects Cicero's definition of res publica as a society founded on justice for a new definition focused on common objects of love. Robert Markus, Oliver O'Donovan, and a host of Augustinian political theologians have depicted this move as a positive gesture toward secular society. Yet this reading fails to account for why Augustine waited so long to address Cicero's definition, first discussed in Book 2, and for the radical dualism Augustine sets forth between the (...)
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  26.  29
    Snapshots 'Sub Specie Aeternitatis': Sinunel, Goffman and Formal Sociology. [REVIEW]Gregory W. H. Smith - 1989 - Human Studies 12 (1-2):19 - 57.
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  27.  11
    Implementation of a Market Entry Reward Within the United States.Gregory W. Daniel, Monika Schneider, Marianne Hamilton Lopez & Mark B. McClellan - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (s1):50-58.
    As part of a multifactorial approach to address weak incentives for innovative antimicrobial drug development, market entry rewards are an emerging solution. Recently, the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy released the Priority Antimicrobial Value and Entry Award proposal, which combines a MER with payment reforms, transitioning from volume-based to “value-based” payments for antimicrobials. Here, the PAVE Award and similar MERs are reviewed, focusing on further refinement and avenues for implementation.
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  28.  16
    Comedy and the Satyr-Chorus.Gregory W. Dobrov - 2007 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 100 (3):251-265.
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  29. Introduction: Simulation, Visualization, and Scientific Understanding.Henk W. de Regt & Wendy S. Parker - 2014 - Perspectives on Science 22 (3):311-317.
    Only a decade ago, the topic of scientific understanding remained one that philosophers of science largely avoided. Earlier discussions by Hempel and others had branded scientific understanding a mere subjective state or feeling, one to be studied by psychologists perhaps, but not an important or fruitful focus for philosophers of science. Even as scientific explanation became a central topic in philosophy of science, little attention was given to understanding. Over the last decade, however, this situation has changed. Analyses of scientific (...)
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  30. Could There Be Another Galileo Case?Gregory W. Dawes - 2002 - Journal of Religion and Society 4.
    In his 1615 letter to the Grand Duchess Christina of Lorraine, Galileo argues for a “principle of limitation”: the authority of Scripture should not be invoked in scientific matters. In doing so, he claims to be following the example of St Augustine. But Augustine’s position would be better described as a “principle of differing purpose”: although the Scriptures were not written in order to reveal scientific truths, such matters may still be covered by biblical authority. The Roman Catholic Church has (...)
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  31. Constructing Multiracial Democracy: To Deliberate or Not to Deliberate?Gregory W. Streich - 2002 - Constellations 9 (1):127-153.
  32.  24
    Counterfactual Plausibility and Comparative Similarity.L. Stanley Matthew, W. Stewart Gregory & Brigard Felipe De - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S5):1216-1228.
    Counterfactual thinking involves imagining hypothetical alternatives to reality. Philosopher David Lewis argued that people estimate the subjective plausibility that a counterfactual event might have occurred by comparing an imagined possible world in which the counterfactual statement is true against the current, actual world in which the counterfactual statement is false. Accordingly, counterfactuals considered to be true in possible worlds comparatively more similar to ours are judged as more plausible than counterfactuals deemed true in possible worlds comparatively less similar. Although Lewis (...)
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  33.  14
    Supererogation, Wrongdoing, and Vice.Gregory W. Trianosky - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Journal of Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 26-40.
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  34.  4
    From" Never to Harm" to Harnessing Plague: A Paradigm Shift in Plague Ethics.Gregory W. Rutecki - 2008 - International Journal of Ethics 6 (2-3):137-156.
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  35.  31
    Plantinga's Necessary A Posteriori Truths.Gregory W. Fitch - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):323-327.
    Alvin Plantinga has recently argued that there are certain propositions which are necessary but known only a posteriori. If Plantinga is correct then he has shown that the traditional view that all necessary truths are knowable a priori is false. Plantinga's examples deserve special attention because they differ in important respects from other proposed examples of necessary a posteriori truths. His examples depend on a certain conception of possible worlds and in particular on his conception of the actual world. It (...)
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  36.  24
    Revisiting the Navajo Way: Lessons for Contemporary Healing.Gregory W. Schneider & Mark J. DeHaven - 2003 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3):413-427.
  37.  4
    A Christian Physician: Combining Conscience, Philanthropia, and Calling.Michael J. Sleasman & Gregory W. Rutecki - 2016 - Christian Bioethics 22 (3):340-362.
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  38. Supererogation, Wrongdoing, and Vice.Gregory W. Trianosky - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press.
     
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  39.  5
    Blurring Distinctions Between the Dying and the Dead: A Call for Discernment in Organ Donation.Gregory W. Rutecki - 1993 - Ethics and Medicine: A Christian Perspective on Issues in Bioethics 10 (3):60-67.
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  40.  7
    Challenges in the Appropriation of Augustine.Gregory W. Lee - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):124-128.
    James K. A. Smith’s Awaiting the King is the most effective popularization of Augustine’s political thought currently available, but its reliance on the work of Oliver O’Donovan obscures uncomfortable elements of Augustine’s thought, and it does not adequately address how the racial and socioeconomic composition of Christian communities is itself formative.
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  41. Review Essay: Recent Trends in Comparative Political Economy and Their Implications for Japan.Gregory W. Noble - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 4 (1):135-151.
  42.  19
    Ethical Decision Making for Christian Physicians: Inspiration From Saint Ignatius of Loyola.Gregory W. Schneider - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (4):673-680.
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  43.  2
    Who’s Borrowing? Credit Encouragement Vs. Credit Mitigation in National Financial Systems.Gregory W. Fuller - 2015 - Politics and Society 43 (2):241-268.
    Households and banks have increasingly displaced non-financial businesses and governments as the primary debtors in modern capitalist economies, resulting in more severe economic cycles, increased inequality, and external macroeconomic imbalances. Yet while the trend is nearly universal among developed economies, its intensity varies a great deal from country to country. This article highlights the common international causes behind the global expansion of household and financial sector debt; the divergent national approaches to household credit that cause household and financial sector indebtedness (...)
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  44.  7
    Could There Be Another Galileo Case? Galileo, Augustine, and Vatican II.Gregory W. Dawes - 2011 - Journal of Religion and Society 4.
    In his 1615 letter to the Grand Duchess Christina of Lorraine, Galileo argues for a “principle of limitation”: the authority of Scripture should not be invoked in scientific matters. In doing so, he claims to be following the example of St Augustine. But Augustine’s position would be better described as a “principle of differing purpose”: although the Scriptures were not written in order to reveal scientific truths, such matters may still be covered by biblical authority. The Roman Catholic Church has (...)
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  45. Evolution and the Bible: The Hermeneutical Question.Gregory W. Dawes - 2012 - Relegere 2:37-63.
    Theistic evolutionists often suggest that one can reconcile evolutionary theory with biblical teaching. But in fact Christians have accepted Darwinian theory only after reinterpreting the opening chapters of Genesis. Is such a reinterpretation justified? Within Western Christian thought, there exists a hermeneutical tradition that dates back to St Augustine and which offers guidelines regarding apparent conflicts between biblical teaching and natural philosophy (or “science”). These state that the literal meaning of the text may be abandoned only if the natural-philosophical conclusions (...)
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  46. Galileo and the Conflict Between Religion and Science.Gregory W. Dawes - 2016 - Routledge.
    For more than 30 years, historians have rejected what they call the ‘warfare thesis’ – the idea that there is an inevitable conflict between religion and science – insisting that scientists and believers can live in harmony. This book disagrees. Taking as its starting point the most famous of all such conflicts, the Galileo affair, it argues that religious and scientific communities exhibit very different attitudes to knowledge. Scripturally based religions not only claim a source of knowledge distinct from human (...)
     
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  47.  8
    God Beyond Theism? Bishop Spong, Paul Tillich, and the Unicorn.Gregory W. Dawes - 2011 - Pacifica 15 (1):65-71.
    John Shelby Spong has recently advocated belief in a ‘God beyond theism’. While rejecting traditional theism, he also distinguishes his position from atheism. He suggests that there is a divine reality, which may be described as ‘being itself’ and which reveals itself in our commitment to unconditional ideals. The paper argues that this notion of God is vacuous, the product of a confused belief that ‘being’ is a characteristic of individual beings which may be universalized. Belief in such a God (...)
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  48. Justified Believing:Avoiding the Paradox.Gregory W. Dawes - 2012 - In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor: Essays in Honour of Colin Cheyne. Springer.
    Colin Cheyne has argued that under certain circumstances an internalist or deontological theory of epistemic justification will give rise to a paradox. The paradox, he argues, arises when a principle of epistemic justification is both justifiably believed (in terms of the theory) and false. To avoid this paradox, Cheyne recommends abandoning the principle of justification-transference, which states that acts of believing made on the basis of a justifiably-believed principle are themselves justified. Since such a principle seems essential to any internalist (...)
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  49. Paradigmatic Explanations: Strauss's Dangerous Idea.Gregory W. Dawes - 2007 - Louvain Studies 32 (1-2):67-80.
    David Friedrich Strauss is best known for his mythical interpretation of the Gospel narratives. He opposed both the supernaturalists (who regarded the Gospel stories as reliable) and the rationalists (who offered natural explanations of purportedly supernatural events). His mythical interpretation suggests that many of the stories about Jesus were woven out of pre-existing messianic beliefs and expectations. Picking up this suggestion, I argue that the Gospel writers thought paradigmatically rather than historically. A paradigmatic explanation assimilates the event-to-be- explained to what (...)
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  50. Religious Studies and Theology in the University: 'Some Ambiguities' Revisited.Gregory W. Dawes - 1996 - Religion 26:49-68.
    What is the relationship between religious studies and theology? Do both have a place within the university? This paper will argue that no clear distinction can be drawn between religious studies and theology on the level of the methods they employ. Each is multidisciplinary and each is able to address questions of religious truth. They can be distinguished only by asking `What is the question which each is attempting to answer?'. Religious studies addresses the question of the meaning and truth (...)
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