Results for 'Grief'

384 found
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  1.  8
    2000 European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic Logic Colloquium 2000.Mosconi M.-H. Mourgues C. Muhlrad, L. Pacholski Grief & J. -P. Ressayre B. Velickovic - 2001 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 7 (4):82.
  2.  7
    Discussion.Robert Multhauf, Ralph Grief, Nathan Reingold, Dr Dupree & Luther Evans - 1962 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 53:87-98.
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  3. Grief and Recovery.Ryan Preston-Roedder & Erica Preston-Roedder - 2017 - In Anna Gotlib (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Sadness. London: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Imagine that someone recovers relatively quickly, say, within two or three months, from grief over the death of her spouse, whom she loved and who loved her; and suppose that, after some brief interval, she remarries. Does the fact that she feels better and moves on relatively quickly somehow diminish the quality of her earlier relationship? Does it constitute a failure to do well by the person who died? Our aim is to respond to two arguments that give affirmative (...)
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  4. Finding the Good in Grief: What Augustine Knew but Meursault Couldn't.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (1):91-105.
    Meursault, the protagonist of Camus' The Stranger, is unable to grieve, a fact that ultimately leads to his condemnation and execution. Given the emotional distresses involved in grief, should we envy Camus or pity him? I defend the latter conclusion. As St. Augustine seemed to dimly recognize, the pains of grief are integral to the process of bereavement, a process that both motivates and provides a distinctive opportunity to attain the good of self-knowledge.
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  5.  80
    Grief: Putting the Past Before Us.Michael R. Kelly - 2016 - Quaestiones Disputatae 7 (1):156-177.
    Grief research in philosophy agrees that one who grieves grieves over the irreversible loss of someone whom the griever loved deeply, and that someone thus factored centrally into the griever’s sense of purpose and meaning in the world. The analytic literature in general tends to focus its treatments on the paradigm case of grief as the death of a loved one. I want to restrict my account to the paradigm case because the paradigm case most persuades the mind (...)
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  6. Grief's Rationality, Backward and Forward.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 94 (2):255-272.
    Grief is our emotional response to the deaths of intimates, and so like many other emotional conditions, it can be appraised in terms of its rationality. A philosophical account of grief's rationality should satisfy a contingency constraint, wherein grief is neither intrinsically rational nor intrinsically irrational. Here I provide an account of grief and its rationality that satisfies this constraint, while also being faithful to the phenomenology of grief experience. I begin by arguing against the (...)
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  7.  73
    Sorrow and the Sage: Grief in the Zhuangzi.Amy Olberding - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):339-359.
    The Zhuangzi offers two apparently incompatible models of bereavement. Zhuangzi sometimes suggests that the sage will greet loss with unfractured equanimity and even aplomb. However, upon the death of his own wife, Zhuangzi evinces a sorrow that, albeit brief, fits ill with this suggestion. In this essay, I contend that the grief that Zhuangzi displays at his wife’s death better honors wider values averred elsewhere in the text and, more generally, that a sage who retains a capacity for sorrow (...)
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  8.  52
    Grief and End-of-Life Surrogate Decision Making.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - In John K. Davis (ed.), Ethics at the End of Life: New Issues and Arguments. New York: Routledge. pp. 201-217.
    Because an increasing number of patients have medical conditions that render them incompetent at making their own medical choices, more and more medical choices are now made by surrogates, often patient family members. However, many studies indicate that surrogates often do not discharge their responsibilities adequately, and in particular, do not choose in accordance with what those patients would have chosen for themselves, especially when it comes to end-of-life medical choices. This chapter argues that a significant part of the explanation (...)
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  9.  47
    Is Post-Mortem Harm Possible? Understanding Death Harm and Grief.Floris Tomasini - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (8):441-449.
    The purpose of this article is not to affirm or deny particular philosophical positions, but to explore the limits of intelligibility about what post-mortem harm means, especially in the light of improper post-mortem procedures at Bristol and Alder Hey hospitals in the late 1990s. The parental claims of post-mortem harm to dead children at Alder Hey Hospital are reviewed from five different philosophical perspectives, eventually settling on a crucial difference of perspective about how we understand harm to the dead. On (...)
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  10.  83
    On Grief and Mourning: Thinking a Feeling, Back to Bob Solomon.Purushottama Bilimoria - 2011 - Sophia 50 (2):281-301.
    The paper considers various ruminations on the aftermath of the death of a close one, and the processes of grieving and mourning. The conceptual examination of how grief impacts on its sufferers, from different cultural perspectives, is followed by an analytical survey of current thinking among psychologists, psychoanalysts and philosophers on the enigma of grief, and on the associated practice of mourning. Robert C. Solomon reflected deeply on the 'extreme emotion' of grief in his extensive theorizing on (...)
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  11.  63
    Is 'Normal Grief' a Mental Disorder?S. Wilkinson - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):289-305.
  12.  7
    Over a Dead Body: International Coverage of Grief.Jonathan Ilan - 2015 - Semiotica 2015 (205):229-242.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2015 Heft: 205 Seiten: 229-242.
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  13. Death, Grief, and Bereavement: A Bibliography, 1845-1975.Robert Fulton - 1976 - Arno Press.
     
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  14. Searching for Comfort: Coping with Grief: Insights, Inspirational Stories and Letters of Consolation.Meʼir ben Eliyahu Munḳ - 2003 - Mesorah Publications.
     
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  15. Grief: A Narrative Account.Peter Goldie - 2011 - Ratio 24 (2):119-137.
    Grief is not a kind of feeling, or a kind of judgement, or a kind of perception, or any kind of mental state or event the identity of which can be adequately captured at a moment in time. Instead, grief is a kind of process; more specifically, it is a complex pattern of activity and passivity, inner and outer, which unfolds over time, and the unfolding pattern over time is explanatorily prior to what is the case at any (...)
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  16. The Consummation of Sorrow: An Analysis of Confucius' Grief for Yan Hui.Amy Olberding - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (3):279-301.
    : Throughout the Analects, Confucius describes the capacity for grief as an ethically valuable trait. Here his own display of grief at the premature death of his beloved student Yan Hui is investigated as a model of the meaning and significance of grief in a flourishing life. This display, it is argued, provides a valuable portrait, in situ, of the specific species of grief that Confucius sanctions and encourages. It likewise makes clear the role played by (...)
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  17.  31
    Bringing Ourselves to Grief.David W. McIvor - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (4):409-436.
    Within political theory there has been a recent surge of interest in the themes of loss, grief, and mourning. In this paper i address questions about the politics of mourning through a critical engagement of the work of Judith Butler. I argue that Butler's work remains tethered to an account of melancholic subjectivity derived from her early reading of Freud. These investments in melancholia compromise Butler's recent ethico-political interventions by obscuring the ambivalence of political engagements and the possibilities of (...)
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  18.  85
    The Rationality of Grief.Carolyn Price - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):20-40.
    Donald Gustafson has argued that grief centres on a combination of belief and desire: The belief that the subject has suffered an irreparable loss. The desire that this should not be the case. And yet, as Gustafson points out, if the belief is true, the desire cannot be satisfied. Gustafson takes this to show that grief inevitably implies an irrational conflict between belief and desire. I offer a partial defence of grief against Gustafson's charge of irrationality. My (...)
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  19.  19
    Presence in Absence. The Ambiguous Phenomenology of Grief.Thomas Fuchs - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (1):43-63.
    Despite its complex experiential structure, the phenomenon of grief following bereavement has not been a major topic of phenomenological research. The paper investigates its basic structures, elaborating as its core characteristic a conflict between a presentifying and a ‘de-presentifying’ intention: In grief, the subject experiences a fundamental ambiguity between presence and absence of the deceased, between the present and the past, indeed between two worlds he lives in. This phenomenological structure will be analyzed under several aspects: regarding bodily (...)
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  20.  38
    The Time Is Out of Joint: A Hermeneutic Phenomenology of Grief.Joseph Keeping - 2014 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 18 (2):233-255.
    In this paper, I embark upon a hermeneutic phenomenological analysis of the emotion of grief, based upon three experiences of grief I witnessed over the preceding year. I find that grief is best construed not as an emotion akin to sadness or anger, but as an affective-behavioural complex resulting from a discord between the world that we affectively inhabit and the world in which we currently find ourselves. I therefore conceive the process of getting over grief, (...)
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  21.  19
    Grief, Death, and Longing in Stoic and Christian Ethics.Paul Scherz - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (1):7-28.
    The Stoic rejection of the passion of grief strikes many ethicists writing on dying as inhuman, selfish, or lacking appreciation for the world. This essay argues that Stoics rejected grief and the fear of death because these passions alienated one from the present through sorrow or anxiety for the future, disrupting one's ability to fulfill obligations of care for others and to feel gratitude for the gift of loved ones. Early Christian writers on death, such as Ambrose, maintained (...)
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  22.  2
    Mourning Nature: Hope at the Heart of Ecological Grief and Loss Ed. By Ashlee Cunsolo and Karen Landman.Alan E. Stewart - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):79-86.
    If C.S. Lewis' A Grief Observed can be considered an account of a lost human relationship, then Cunsolo and Landman's Mourning Nature forms a posthuman, but nonetheless personal, examination of the losses of relationships with plants, animals, and even entire ecosystems—an ecological grief observed. In this regard, one of the motivations for this book was Cunsolo's interviews with Inuit residents who experienced profound sadness and despair at the changes in the landscape brought by climate change. Beyond this, each (...)
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  23.  15
    On Grief’s Ambiguous Nature.Sonja Rinofner-Kreidl - 2016 - Quaestiones Disputatae 7 (1):178-207.
    The dominant view on grieving processes throughout the twentieth century was based on the idea that grief ’s purpose is to loosen and finally sever the bonds with the deceased in order to set oneself free. An expanded view, which aims at a more complete and more complex understanding of grief, corrected the former approach by arguing in favor of continuing bonds. The expanded view certainly fits better the meaning of attachment relations in human life. So-called disenfranchised (...) nonetheless reveals additional normative constraints in terms of social control mechanisms taking effect with regard to expressions of grief. The present paper argues that duly considering the complex and ambiguous nature of grief, as well as its transformative power, requires challenging the standard view of disenfranchised grief. I propose an expanded view that is based on the idea that proponents of the standard view have failed to inquire into the equivocal meaning of a common conversation about “coping with grief ”. Arguing in favor of an expanded account of disenfranchised grief by following the second reading then requires acknowledging the inseparability of grief ’s existential depth and social implications. With a view to this inseparability, it is argued that coping with grief is a public affair instead of a merely private experience. (shrink)
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  24.  73
    Altruism, Grief, and Identity.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):371 - 383.
    The divide between oneself and others has made altruism seem irrational to some thinkers, as Sidgwick points out. I use characterizations of grief, especially by St. Augustine, to question the divide, and use a composition-as-identity metaphysics of parts and wholes to make literal sense of those characterizations.
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  25.  10
    Ongoing: On Grief’s Open-Ended Rehearsal.Line Ryberg Ingerslev - forthcoming - Continental Philosophy Review:1-18.
    Peter Goldie’s account of grief as a narrative process that unfolds over time allow us to address the structure of self-understanding in the experience of loss. Taking up the Goldie’s idea that narrativity plays a crucial role in grief, I will argue that the experience of desynchronization and an altered relation to language disrupt even of our ability to compose narratives and to think narratively. Further, I will argue that Goldie’s account of grief as a narratively structured (...)
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  26.  38
    News Photographs and the Pornography of Grief.Jennifer E. Brown - 1987 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 2 (2):75 – 81.
    Everyone knows a picture is worth a thousand words. But sometimes, especially in journalism, a picture can be worth much, much more. This added value isn't always positive. Pictures can inflict lasting pain on victims of grief and tragedy. This paper by an undergraduate journalism student explores the ethical dilemmas photographers face when capturing such traumatic incidents on film and explores the lack of professional guidelines available to guide them.
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  27.  10
    In the Grip of Grief:Epistemic Impotence and the Materiality of Mourning in Shinya Tsukamoto’s Vital.Havi Hannah Carel - unknown
    When someone close to us dies, we usually say that we are with them ‘in our thoughts’ or that they remain alive in our minds. The film Vital challenges this disembodied view of grief by posing the following question: what would grief be like if we could keep the dead with us not only in our memories, but materially? The film provides an intriguing answer to this question, provided through a unique setting, that of a medical school dissection (...)
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  28.  13
    Leading Organizations Through the Stages of Grief: The Development of Negative Emotions Over Environmental Change.Rolf Wüstenhagen & Elmar Friedrich - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (2):186-213.
    This conceptual article theorizes about the effect of emotions of individual organizational leaders during a period of sustainability-related upheaval within an industry. To illustrate the effect of emotions, it proposes to draw on the model of five stages of grief by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, a conceptual framework describing terminally ill patients’ responses to their impending death. The authors adapt Kübler-Ross’s taxonomy and use anecdotal evidence from grieving top managers of energy companies in response to the nuclear phase-out in Germany. The (...)
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  29.  22
    Codes Should Address Exploitation of Grief by Photographers.George E. Padgett - 1985 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 1 (1):50 – 56.
    News photographers are increasingly involved in selling the news at anyone's expense, exploiting grief for a profit Camera crews are becoming increasingly brazen, entering not only the funeral home, but the casket as well, crashing through the walls of privacy that have traditionally and morally protected the right of all individuals to grieve in the privacy of their own emotions. Depictions of tragedy per se are contentious, but depictions of grieving survivors are even more so. A limited but increasing (...)
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  30.  13
    Witnessing Animal Others: Bearing Witness, Grief, and the Political Function of Emotion.Kathryn Gillespie - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):572-588.
    This article theorizes the politics of witnessing and grief in the context of the embodied experience of cows raised for dairy in the Pacific Northwestern United States. Bearing witness to the mundane features of dairy production and their impact on cows' physical and emotional worlds enables us to understand the violence of commodification and the political dimensions of witnessing the suffering of an Other. I argue that greater attention should be paid to the uneven hierarchies of power in the (...)
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  31.  18
    Good Grief: Bereavement Literature for Young Adults and A Monster Calls.G. Day - 2012 - Medical Humanities 38 (2):115-119.
    Recent years have seen a proliferation of critically acclaimed novels for young adults dealing with bereavement. This is part of a ‘bereavement turn’—a contemporary cultural movement to examine publicly our attitudes to death and grieving. This paper examines the narrative strategies in Patrick Ness's award-winning novel A Monster Calls to look at the ways in which the psychic burden of the impending loss of a parent through cancer is managed. The book draws on conventions of children's literature to create a (...)
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  32.  27
    The Year of Magical Thinking: Joan Didion and the Dialectic of Grief.F. Brennan & M. Dash - 2008 - Medical Humanities 34 (1):35-39.
    Joan Didion is a prominent American writer. In late 2003, while her only child lay critically ill, her husband, John, died suddenly. Theirs was a marriage of great intimacy and love. Grief enveloped her. Eventually she began to write an account of the first 12 months of her bereavement and the vigil for her child: The year of magical thinking. Raw, insightful and challenging, it is a rich, generous and graceful document. Didion draws on the literature of grief, (...)
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  33.  12
    The Value of Ritual Theory for Pastoral Care in Times of Grief.Santie Bothe-Smith & Yolanda Dreyer - 2014 - Hts Theological Studies 70 (3):01-10.
    In this article the focus is on ritual theory and its relevance for pastoral care during the grief process. For these purposes the first task at hand is finding an appropriate description of what ritual implies, especially in the context of pastoral care. It includes studying different descriptions from different study fields to provide a broad theoretical view of ritual and to identify relevant perspectives. This view is narrowed to ritual as performance as well as legitimisation of experience. Concerning (...)
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  34.  28
    Yan Hui's Death as a Threat to Confucius' Expression of Virtue: A Further Look at the Master's Grief.Joshua Seachris - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (2):105 – 122.
    A striking feature of Confucius' grief at the death of his beloved disciple Yan Hui is its profound intensity, an intensity detectable nowhere else in the <span>Analects</span>. Like his disciples, the reader of the <span>Analects</span> may be puzzled by the depth of Confucius' grief in this instance. In distinct accounts, Philip Ivanhoe and Amy Olberding bring some measure of intelligibility to the Master's grief. While partially plausible, I think their offerings on the matter fall short of being (...)
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  35.  9
    Le grief, une expérience de recherche interdisciplinaire.Agnès Fine & Claudine Leduc - 2010 - Clio 32:131-140.
    Dans le contexte de grande liberté qui caractérise l’Université des années 1970-1980, une douzaine d’enseignantes-chercheuses toulousaines venues de disciplines très différentes ont fondé le grief ettenté l’expérience d’une approche interdisciplinaire de l’histoire des femmes et du genre. Une telle démarche, que l’organisation actuelle de la recherche a rendue utopique, a joué un rôle déterminant dans leur formation intellectuelle, leur affirmation de soi et, pour certaines d’entre elles, dans l’orientation de leurs travaux.
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  36. «The Grief Willed by God»: Three Patristic Interpretations of 2Cor 7: 10.John Gavin - 2010 - Gregorianum 91 (3):427-442.
    The expression «the grief willed by God» in 2Cor 7:10 posed a problem for monastic writers who were also drawing upon the Stoic tradition of the four disordered passions . This essay examines three treatments of the Pauline expression by Evagrius Ponticus, Diadochus of Photice, and Maximus the Confessor, who strove to interpret 'grief' as both a vice and a virtue . While Evagarius establishes the basic understanding of «the grief willed by God» as a stimulus for (...)
     
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  37.  51
    Reason's Grief: An Essay on Tragedy and Value.George W. Harris - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Reason's Grief takes W. B. Yeats's comment that we begin to live only when we have conceived life as tragedy as a call for a tragic ethics, something the modern West has yet to produce. Harris argues that we must turn away from religious understandings of tragedy and the human condition and realize that our species will occupy a very brief period of history, at some point to disappear without a trace. We must accept an ethical perspective that avoids (...)
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  38. Grief and its Transcendence: Memory, Identity, Creativity.Adele Tutter & Léon Wurmser (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    Grief and its Transcendence: Memory, Identity, Creativity is a landmark contribution that provides fresh insights into the experience and process of mourning. It includes fourteen original essays by pre-eminent psychoanalysts, historians, classicists, theologians, architects, art-historians and artists, that take on the subject of normal, rather than pathological mourning. In particular, it considers the diversity of the mourning process; the bereavement of ordinary vs. extraordinary loss; the contribution of mourning to personal and creative growth; and individual, social, and cultural means (...)
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  39. The Other Side of Care: Some Thoughts on Caregiving and Grief.Anna Gotlib - 2013 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):179-184.
  40.  19
    Remembering and Loving in Relationships Involving Dying, Death, and Grief.Christine M. Koggel - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4).
  41.  7
    Remembering and Loving in Relationships Involving Dying, Death, and Grief.Christine M. Koggel - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):193-198.
  42. Grief and Belief.Jonathan Gilmore - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):103-107.
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  43.  8
    Is ‘Normal Grief’ a Mental Disorder&Quest.Stephen Wilkinson - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):290-304.
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  44.  61
    Antigone's Laments, Creon's Grief.Bonnie Honig - 2009 - Political Theory 37 (1):5-43.
    This paper reads Sophocles' " Antigone " contextually, as an exploration of the politics of lamentation and larger conflicts these stand for. Antigone defies Creon's sovereign decree that her brother Polynices, who attacked the city with a foreign army and died in battle, be dishonoured - left unburied. But the play is not about Polynices' treason. It explores the clash in 5th century Athens between Homeric/elite and democratic mourning practices. The former memorialize the unique individuality of the dead, focus on (...)
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  45.  11
    Is 'Normal Grief' a Mental Disorder?Stephen Wilkinson - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):290-304.
  46.  73
    Grief.Donald Gustafson - 1989 - Noûs 23 (4):457-479.
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  47.  53
    Grief and the Poet.C. Wilson - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):77-91.
    Poetry, drama and the novel present readers and viewers with emotionally significant situations that they often experience as moving, and their being so moved is one of the principal motivations for engaging with fictions. If emotions are considered as action-prompting beliefs about the environment, the appetite for sad or frightening drama and literature is difficult to explain, insofar nothing tragic or frightening is actually happening to the reader, and people do not normally enjoy being sad or frightened. The paper argues (...)
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  48. Book Review: Stories From the Edge: A Theology of Grief[REVIEW]Jaco J. Hamman - 2009 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 63 (4):434-436.
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  49.  10
    Waorani Grief and the Witch‐Killer's Rage: Worldview, Emotion, and Anthropological Explanation.Clayton Robarchek & Carole Robarchek - 2005 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 33 (2):206-230.
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  50.  10
    A Lifetime of Mourning: Grief Work Among Yucatec Maya Women.Anne C. Woodrick - 1995 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 23 (4):401-423.
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