Results for 'Guez Don��'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Ateísmo en el siglo XVII: Análisis del Theophrastus Redivivus.Marcelino RodrÍ, Guez DonÍ & S. - 2003 - Agora 22 (1):155-176.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Aging: I Don’T Want to Be a Cyborg! [REVIEW]Don Ihde - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):397-404.
    Examination is made of a range of cyborg solutions to bodily problems due to damage, but here with particular reference to aging. Both technological and animal implants, transplants and prosthetic devices are phenomenologically analyzed. The resultant trade-off phenomena are compared to popular culture technofantasies and desires and finally to human attitudes toward mortality and contingency. The parallelism of resistance to contingent existence and to becoming a cyborg is noted.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3.  64
    Book Symposium on Don Ihde’s Expanding Hermeneutics: Visualism in Science: Northwestern University Press, 1998. [REVIEW]Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Larry A. Hickman, Robert Rosenberger, Robert C. Scharff & Don Ihde - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):249-270.
    Book Symposium on Don Ihde’s Expanding Hermeneutics: Visualism in Science Content Type Journal Article Category Book Symposium Pages 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0060-5 Authors Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, University of Copenhagen, Nørre Farimagsgade 5 A, Room 10.0.27, 1014 Copenhagen, Denmark Larry A. Hickman, The Center for Dewey Studies, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA Robert Rosenberger, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology, DM Smith Building, 685 Cherry Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0345, USA Robert C. Scharff, University of New (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  98
    Protecting Rainforest Realism: James Ladyman, Don Ross: Everything Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007, Pp. 368 £49.00 HB.P. Kyle Stanford, Paul Humphreys, Katherine Hawley, James Ladyman & Don Ross - 2010 - Metascience 19 (2):161-185.
    Reply in Book Symposium on James Ladyman, Don Ross: 'Everything must go: metaphysics naturalized', Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5.  10
    The Right to Strike: Don Locke.Don Locke - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:173-202.
    Only a fool would attempt to discuss the morality of strikes in twenty-five pages or less, and even he will fail. For one thing he can be sure in advance that whatever conclusions he might come to will be ridiculed as outrageous, prejudiced or self-serving by one party or the other. There is, in particular, the accusation that the attempt to discuss in moral terms what is essentially a political issue, is itself an exercise in bourgeois politics disguised as morals, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Don’T Know, Don’T Kill: Moral Ignorance, Culpability, and Caution.Alexander A. Guerrero - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (1):59-97.
    This paper takes on several distinct but related tasks. First, I present and discuss what I will call the "Ignorance Thesis," which states that whenever an agent acts from ignorance, whether factual or moral, she is culpable for the act only if she is culpable for the ignorance from which she acts. Second, I offer a counterexample to the Ignorance Thesis, an example that applies most directly to the part I call the "Moral Ignorance Thesis." Third, I argue for a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  7.  90
    Don Marquis Replies.Don Marquis - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (2):9-11.
  8. A Bio-Logical Theory of Animal Learning.David Guez - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (2):148-158.
    This article provides the foundation for a new predictive theory of animal learning that is based upon a simple logical model. The knowledge of experimental subjects at a given time is described using logical equations. These logical equations are then used to predict a subject’s response when presented with a known or a previously unknown situation. This new theory suc- cessfully anticipates phenomena that existing theories predict, as well as phenomena that they cannot. It provides a theoretical account for phenomena (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Technology and the Lifeworld: From Garden to Earth.Don Ihde - 1990 - Indiana University Press.
    "... Dr. Ihde brings an enlightening and deeply humanistic perspective to major technological developments, both past and present." —Science Books & Films "Don Ihde is a pleasure to read.... The material is full of nice suggestions and details, empirical materials, fun variations which engage the reader in the work... the overall points almost sneak up on you, they are so gently and gradually offered." —John Compton "A sophisticated celebration of cultural diversity and of its enabling technologies.... perhaps the best single (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   270 citations  
  10.  69
    Doing Gender.Don H. Zimmerman & Candace West - 1987 - Gender and Society 1 (2):125-151.
    The purpose of this article is to advance a new understanding of gender as a routine accomplishment embedded in everyday interaction. To do so entails a critical assessment of existing perspectives on sex and gender and the introduction of important distinctions among sex, sex category, and gender. We argue that recognition of the analytical independence of these concepts is essential for understanding the interactional work involved in being a gendered person in society. The thrust of our remarks is toward theoretical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   295 citations  
  11.  7
    The Effect of Trier Social Stress Test on Item and Associative Recognition of Words and Pictures in Healthy Participants.Jonathan Guez, Rotem Saar-Ashkenazy, Eldad Keha & Chen Tiferet-Dweck - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy.Don Garrett - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    It is widely believed that Hume often wrote carelessly and contradicted himself, and that no unified, sound philosophy emerges from his writings. Don Garrett demonstrates that such criticisms of Hume are without basis. Offering fresh and trenchant solutions to longstanding problems in Hume studies, Garrett's penetrating analysis also makes clear the continuing relevance of Hume's philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   101 citations  
  13.  10
    The Liar Parody: Don S. Levi.Don S. Levi - 1988 - Philosophy 63 (243):43-62.
    The Liar Paradox is a philosophical bogyman. It refuses to die, despite everything that philosophers have done to kill it. Sometimes the attacks on it seem little more than expressions of positivist petulance, as when the Liar sentence is said to be nonsense or meaningless. Sometimes the attacks are based on administering to the Liar sentence arbitrary if not unfair tests for admitting of truth or falsity that seem designed expressly to keep it from qualifying. Some philosophers have despaired of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  16
    Poem by Don Christianson.Don Christianson - 1985 - Between the Species 1 (4):9.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  43
    Economic Theory and Cognitive Science: Microexplanation.Don Ross - 2007 - Bradford.
    In this study, Don Ross explores the relationship of economics to other branches of behavioral science, asking, in the course of his analysis, under what interpretation economics is a sound empirical science. The book explores the relationships between economic theory and the theoretical foundations of related disciplines that are relevant to the day-to-day work of economics -- the cognitive and behavioral sciences. It asks whether the increasingly sophisticated techniques of microeconomic analysis have revealed any deep empirical regularities -- whether technical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  16. Why Abortion is Immoral.Don Marquis - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):183-202.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   183 citations  
  17. Hume.Don Garrett - 2014 - Routledge.
    Beginning with an overview of Hume's life and work, Don Garrett introduces in clear and accessible style the central aspects of Hume's thought. These include Hume's lifelong exploration of the human mind; his theories of inductive inference and causation; skepticism and personal identity; moral and political philosophy; aesthetics; and philosophy of religion. The final chapter considers the influence and legacy of Hume's thought today. Throughout, Garrett draws on and explains many of Hume's central works, including his Treatise of Human Nature (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  18.  8
    Memory, Memories and Me: Don Locke.Don Locke - 1969 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 3:210-235.
    In this paper I want to discuss two separate problems about memory, connected in that they both have to do with memory as a source or ground of knowledge.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  12
    Is Reasoning in Rats Really Unreasonable? Revisiting Recent Associative Accounts.David Guez & Gregory Stevenson - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
    Beckers et al. (2006) published intriguing results, obtained in the rat fear condi- tioning paradigm, challenging classical associativist theories of learning. One of the main findings of Beckers et al. (2006) is that what they called subad- ditive pretraining abolished the expres- sion of blocking. Haselgrove (2010) proposed an expla- nation, based on the well known Rescorla- Wagner Model (Rescorla and Wagner, 1972). We will demonstrate here that the account offered by Haselgrove (2010) is contradictory to the basic assumptions of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  26
    “Nudging” Deceased Donation Through an Opt-Out System: A Libertarian Approach or Manipulation?David Rodrıguez-Arias & Myfanwy Morgan - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):25-28.
  21. We Don’T Need No Explanation.Jamin Asay - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (4):903-921.
    Explanation has played myriad roles in truthmaker theory. The notion of explanation is sometimes thought to give content to the very idea of truthmaking, and is sometimes used as a weapon to undermine the entire point of truthmaker theory. I argue that the notion of explanation is dialectically useless in truthmaker theory: while it’s true that truthmaking offers a form of explanation, this claim is theoretically unilluminating, and leaves truthmaker theorists vulnerable to various kinds of attack. I advocate an alternative (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22.  49
    The Existential Graphs of Charles S. Peirce.Don D. Roberts - 1973 - The Hague: Mouton.
    1 INTRODUCTION Above the other titles he might justly have claimed, Charles S. Peirce prized the title 'logician'. He expressed in several places his ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  23. You Don't Say! Lying, Asserting and Insincerity.Neri Marsili - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Sheffield
    This thesis addresses philosophical problems concerning improper assertions. The first part considers the issue of defining lying: here, against a standard view, I argue that a lie need not intend to deceive the hearer. I define lying as an insincere assertion, and then resort to speech act theory to develop a detailed account of what an assertion is, and what can make it insincere. Even a sincere assertion, however, can be improper (e.g., it can be false, or unwarranted): in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  44
    Don Ihde Bodies in Technology.Eduardo Mendieta, Evan Selinger & Don Ihde - 2003 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):95–111.
  25. You Don't Say?Kent Bach - 2001 - Synthese 128 (1):15-44.
    This paper defends a purely semantic notion of what is said against various recent objections. The objections each cite some sort of linguistic, psychological, or epistemological fact that is supposed to show that on any viable notion of what a speaker says in uttering a sentence, there is pragmatic intrusion into what is said. Relying on a modified version of Grice's notion, on which what is said must be a projection of the syntax of the uttered sentence, I argue that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  26.  79
    Why Abortion Is Immoral.Don Marquis - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):183-202.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  27.  63
    Models Don’T Decompose That Way: A Holistic View of Idealized Models.Collin Rice - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (1):179-208.
    Many accounts of scientific modelling assume that models can be decomposed into the contributions made by their accurate and inaccurate parts. These accounts then argue that the inaccurate parts of the model can be justified by distorting only what is irrelevant. In this paper, I argue that this decompositional strategy requires three assumptions that are not typically met by our best scientific models. In response, I propose an alternative view in which idealized models are characterized as holistically distorted representations that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  28. God, Wittgenstein and John Cook: Don S. Levi.Don S. Levi - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (2):267-286.
    This essay is a meditation on Wittgenstein's injunction to ‘look and see’, especially when it is applied to the debate over theological realism. John Cook thinks that the injunction should be followed in metaphysics and epistemology, something he believes that Wittgenstein himself did not do. I am inclined to think that Cook is right about this, even though I am not persuaded by him that Wittgenstein goes wrong because he was committed to Neutral Monism. Interestingly, Cook thinks that there is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  30
    P, but You Don't Know That P.Christopher Willard-Kyle - forthcoming - Synthese.
    Unlike first-person Moorean sentences, it’s not always awkward to assert, 'p, but you don’t know that p.' This can seem puzzling: after all, one can never get one’s audience to know the asserted content by speaking thus. Nevertheless, such assertions can be conversationally useful, for instance, by helping speaker and addressee agree on where to disagree. I will argue that such assertions also make trouble for the growing family of views about the norm of assertion that what licenses proper assertion (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. The Physics and Metaphysics of Identity and Individuality: Steven French and Décio Krause: Identity in Physics: A Historical, Philosophical, and Formal Analysis. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2006, 440 Pp, £68.00 HB.Don Howard, Bas C. van Fraassen, Otávio Bueno, Elena Castellani, Laura Crosilla, Steven French & Décio Krause - 2011 - Metascience 20 (2):225-251.
    The physics and metaphysics of identity and individuality Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9463-7 Authors Don Howard, Department of Philosophy and Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Science, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA Bas C. van Fraassen, Philosophy Department, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132, USA Otávio Bueno, Department of Philosophy, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124, USA Elena Castellani, Department of Philosophy, University of Florence, Via Bolognese 52, 50139 (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  31.  23
    Relax? Don’T Do It! Why Moral Realism Won't Come Cheap.Sarah McGrath - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 9.
    Relaxed realists hold that there are deep differences between moral truths and the truths studied by the empirical sciences, but they deny that these differences raise troubling metaphysical or epistemological questions about moral truths. On this view, although features such as causal inefficacy, perceptual inaccessibility, and failure to figure in the best explanations of our empirical beliefs would raise pressing skeptical concerns were they claimed to characterize some aspect of physical reality, the same is not true when it comes to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  32. We Don't Need a Microscope to Explore the Chimpanzee's Mind.Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (1):1-28.
    The question of whether chimpanzees, like humans, reason about unobservable mental states remains highly controversial. On one account, chimpanzees are seen as possessing a psychological system for social cognition that represents and reasons about behaviors alone. A competing account allows that the chimpanzee's social cognition system additionally construes the behaviors it represents in terms of mental states. Because the range of behaviors that each of the two systems can generate is not currently known, and because the latter system depends upon (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   74 citations  
  33. We Don't Need a Microscope to Explore the Chimpanzee's Mind.Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2006 - In Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press. pp. 1-28.
  34.  54
    Listening and Voice. Phenomenologies of Sound.Don Ihde - 2007 - Suny Press.
    Listening and Voice is an updated and expanded edition of Don Ihde's groundbreaking 1976 classic in the study of sound.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  35.  91
    Davidson Was Almost Right About Lying.Don Fallis - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):337-353.
    Donald Davidson once suggested that a liar ?must intend to represent himself as believing what he does not?. In this paper I argue that, while Davidson was mistaken about lying in a few important respects, his main insight yields a very attractive definition of lying. Namely, you lie if and only if you say something that you do not believe and you intend to represent yourself as believing what you say. Moreover, I show that this Davidsonian definition can handle counter-examples (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  36.  19
    Asymmetric Neural Control Systems in Human Self-Regulation.Don M. Tucker & Peter A. Williamson - 1984 - Psychological Review 91 (2):185-215.
  37. Mastering Chess and Shogi by Self-Play with a General Reinforcement Learning Algorithm.David Silver, Thomas Hubert, Julian Schrittwieser, Ioannis Antonoglou, Matthew Lai, Arthur Guez, Marc Lanctot, Laurent Sifre, Dharshan Kumaran, Thore Graepel, Timothy Lillicrap, Karen Simonyan & Demis Hassabis - 2017 - .
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38.  47
    Better Red Than Dead—Putting an End to the Social Irrelevance of Postwar Philosophy of Science.Don Howard - 2009 - Science & Education 18 (2):199-220.
  39.  52
    Neural Networks, Real Patterns, and the Mathematics of Constrained Optimization: An Interview with Don Ross.Don Ross - 2016 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 9 (1):142.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Epistemic Value Theory and Information Ethics.Don Fallis - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (1):101-117.
    Three of the major issues in information ethics – intellectual property, speech regulation, and privacy – concern the morality of restricting people’s access to certain information. Consequently, policies in these areas have a significant impact on the amount and types of knowledge that people acquire. As a result, epistemic considerations are critical to the ethics of information policy decisions (cf. Mill, 1978 [1859]). The fact that information ethics is a part of the philosophy of information highlights this important connection with (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  41.  14
    Markets and Morals*: A Response: Don Locke.Don Locke - 1989 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 26:33-44.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  50
    Don Quixote and the Problem of Idealism and Realism in Business Ethics.Sherwin Klein - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):43-63.
    I discuss the characters Don Quixote and Sancho Panza and their relationship in order to understand better the place of idealistictheory and realistic practice in business ethics. The realism of Sancho Panza is required to make the idealism of Don Quixote effective.Indeed, the interaction and development of these characters can serve as a model for both the effective communication between andblending of the idealistic moral theoretician and the practical businessperson. Specifically, I argue that a quixotified Sancho Panza,as a combination of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  43. “Why Don’T Consumers Care About CSR?”: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Role of CSR in Consumption Decisions. [REVIEW]Magdalena Öberseder, Bodo B. Schlegelmilch & Verena Gruber - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (4):449-460.
    There is an unresolved paradox concerning the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in consumer behavior. On the one hand, consumers demand more and more CSR information from corporations. On the other hand, research indicates a considerable gap between consumers’ apparent interest in CSR and the limited role of CSR in purchase behavior. This article attempts to shed light on this paradox by drawing on qualitative data from in-depth interviews. The findings show that the evaluation of CSR initiatives is a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  44.  7
    Philosophy of Technology: An Introduction.Don Ihde - 1993 - Paragon House.
    Technology's impact on and implications for the social, ethical, political, and cultural dimensions of our world must be seriously considered and addressed. Philosophy of Technology is a clear introduction to one of philosophy's newest issues. Don Ihde critically examines the impact of technological developments on various cultures throughout history-from the earliest feats of engineering and architecture to the cutting-edge developments in artificial intelligence- with an aim to understanding the human implications within a world technological culture. Using a wide variety of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  45.  14
    “Don't Try to Teach Me, I Got Nothing to Learn”: Management Students' Perceptions of Business Ethics Teaching.Guillermina Tormo‐Carbó, Victor Oltra, Katarzyna Klimkiewicz & Elies Seguí‐Mas - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (4):506-528.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46. Ontic Structural Realism and Economics.Don Ross - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (5):732-743.
    Ontic structural realism (OSR) is crucially motivated by empirical discoveries of fundamental physics. To this extent its potential to furnish a general metaphysics for science may appear limited. However, OSR also provides a good account of the progress that has been achieved over the decades in a formalized special science, economics. Furthermore, this has a basis in the ontology presupposed by economic theory, and is not just an artifact of formalization. †To contact the author, please write to: 4th Floor, Humanities (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  47.  32
    Don’T Blame the Model: Reconsidering the Network Approach to Psychopathology.Laura F. Bringmann & Markus I. Eronen - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (4):606-615.
    The network approach to psychopathology is becoming increasingly popular. The motivation for this approach is to provide a replacement for the problematic common cause perspective and the associated latent variable model, where symptoms are taken to be mere effects of a common cause (the disorder itself). The idea is that the latent variable model is plausible for medical diseases, but unrealistic for mental disorders, which should rather be conceptualized as networks of directly interacting symptoms. We argue that this rationale for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  48.  84
    Lost Wanderers in the Forest of Knowledge: Some Thoughts on the Discovery-Justification Distinction.Don Howard - 2006 - In Jutta Schickore & Friedrich Steinle (eds.), Revisiting Discovery and Justification: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on the Context Distinction. Springer. pp. 3--22.
    Neo-positivism is dead. Let that imperfect designation stand for the project that dominated and defined the philosophy of science, especially in its Anglophone form, during the fifty or so years following the end of the Second World War. While its critics were many,1 its death was slow, and some think still to find a pulse.2 But die it did in the cul-de-sac into which it was led by its own faulty compass.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  49. Don’T Count on Taurek: Vindicating the Case for the Numbers Counting.Yishai Cohen - 2014 - Res Publica 20 (3):245-261.
    Suppose you can save only one of two groups of people from harm, with one person in one group, and five persons in the other group. Are you obligated to save the greater number? While common sense seems to say ‘yes’, the numbers skeptic says ‘no’. Numbers Skepticism has been partly motivated by the anti-consequentialist thought that the goods, harms and well-being of individual people do not aggregate in any morally significant way. However, even many non-consequentialists think that Numbers Skepticism (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50.  79
    Why Don't We Trust Moral Testimony?James Andow - 2020 - Mind and Language 35 (4):456-474.
1 — 50 / 1000