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Guido Berens [5]Guido A. J. M. Berens [1]
  1.  42
    The Impact of Interactive Corporate Social Responsibility Communication on Corporate Reputation.David Eberle, Guido Berens & Ting Li - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):731-746.
    Companies increasingly communicate about corporate social responsibility (CSR) through interactive online media. We examine whether using such media is beneficial to a company’s reputation. We conducted an online experiment to examine the impacts of interactivity in CSR messages on corporate reputation and word-of-mouth intentions. Our findings suggest that an increase in perceived interactivity leads to higher message credibility and stronger feelings of identification with the company, which also boost corporate reputation and word-of-mouth. This result implies that using interactive channels to (...)
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  2.  14
    The Impact of Four Types of Corporate Social Performance on Reputation and Financial Performance.Yijing Wang & Guido Berens - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):337-359.
    The goal of this paper was to investigate whether and how a firm that engages in different kinds of corporate social performance can create a favorable corporate reputation among its stakeholders, and as a result achieve a good financial performance. Building on stakeholder theory, we distinguish two types of reputation—reputation among public stakeholders and reputation among financial stakeholders. We argue that CSP activities affect these two reputations differently. In addition, we empirically test the relationship among different types of CSP, reputation (...)
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  3.  27
    Managing Impressions in the Face of Rising Stakeholder Pressures: Examining Oil Companies’ Shifting Stances in the Climate Change Debate.Mignon D. Van Halderen, Mamta Bhatt, Guido A. J. M. Berens, Tom J. Brown & Cees B. M. Van Riel - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (3):567-582.
    In this paper, we examine how organizations’ impression management evolves in response to rising stakeholder pressures regarding organizations’ corporate responsibility initiatives. We conducted a comparative case study analysis over a period of 13 years for two organizations—Exxon and BP—that took extreme initial stances on climate change. We found that as stakeholder pressures rose, their IM tactics unfolded in four phases: advocating the initial stance, sensegiving to clarify the initial stance, image repairing, and adjusting the stance. Taken together, our analysis of (...)
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  4.  8
    Managing Impressions in the Face of Rising Stakeholder Pressures: Examining Oil Companies’ Shifting Stances in the Climate Change Debate.Cees Riel, Tom J. Brown, Guido Berens, Mamta Bhatt & Mignon Halderen - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (3):567-582.
    In this paper, we examine how organizations’ impression management evolves in response to rising stakeholder pressures regarding organizations’ corporate responsibility initiatives. We conducted a comparative case study analysis over a period of 13 years for two organizations—Exxon and BP—that took extreme initial stances on climate change. We found that as stakeholder pressures rose, their IM tactics unfolded in four phases: advocating the initial stance, sensegiving to clarify the initial stance, image repairing, and adjusting the stance. Taken together, our analysis of (...)
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  5.  64
    The CSR-Quality Trade-Off: When Can Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Ability Compensate Each Other?Guido Berens, Cees B. M. van Riel & Johan van Rekom - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):233 - 252.
    This paper investigates under what conditions a good corporate social responsibility (CSR) can compensate for a relatively poor corporate ability (CA) (quality), and vice versa. The authors conducted an experiment among business administration students, in which information about a financial services company's CA and CSR was provided. Participants indicated their preferences for the company's products, stocks, and jobs. The results show that for stock and job preferences, a poor CA can be compensated by a good CSR. For product preferences, a (...)
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