Results for 'Gyrus Cinguli'

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  1. Conflict Monitoring and Anterior Cingulate Cortex: An Update.Matthew M. Botvinick, Jonathan D. Cohen & Cameron S. Carter - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (12):539-546.
    One hypothesis concerning the human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is that it functions, in part, to signal the occurrence of conflicts in information processing, thereby triggering compensatory adjustments in cognitive control. Since this idea was first proposed, a great deal of relevant empirical evidence has accrued. This evidence has largely corroborated the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, and some very recent work has provided striking new support for the theory. At the same time, other findings have posed specific challenges, especially concerning the (...)
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  2. The Empathic Brain: How, When and Why?Frederique De Vignemont & Tania Singer - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):435-441.
    Recent imaging results suggest that individuals automatically share the emotions of others when exposed to their emotions. We question the assumption of the automaticity and propose a contextual approach, suggesting several modulatory factors that might influence empathic brain responses. Contextual appraisal could occur early in emotional cue evaluation, which then might or might not lead to an empathic brain response, or not until after an empathic brain response is automatically elicited. We propose two major roles for empathy; its epistemological role (...)
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  3.  72
    Emotional Processing in Anterior Cingulate and Medial Prefrontal Cortex.A. Etkin, T. Egner & R. Kalisch - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):85-93.
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  4.  54
    Cortical Midline Structures and the Self.G. Northoff & F. Bermpohl - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):102-107.
  5. A Neuronal Model of a Global Workspace in Effortful Cognitive Tasks.Stanislas Dehaene, Michel Kerszberg & Jean-Pierre Changeux - 2001 - Pnas 95 (24):14529-14534.
  6. Action Sets and Decisions in the Medial Frontal Cortex.M. F. Rushworth, M. E. Walton, S. W. Kennerley & D. M. Bannerman - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):410-417.
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  7.  8
    Other Minds in the Brain: A Functional Imaging Study of "Theory of Mind" in Story Comprehension.P. C. Fletcher, F. Happé, U. Frith, S. C. Baker, R. J. Dolan, R. S. Frackowiak & C. D. Frith - 1995 - Cognition 57 (2):109-128.
  8. Attention to Action and Awareness of Other Minds.Christopher D. Frith - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):481-487.
    We have only limited awareness of the system by which we control our actions and this limited awareness does not seem to be concerned with the control of action. Awareness of choosing one action rather than another comes after the choice has been made, while awareness of initiating an action occurs before the movement has begun. These temporal differences bind together in consciousness the intention to act and the consequences of the action. This creates our sense of agency. Activity in (...)
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  9.  59
    Neural Correlates of Establishing, Maintaining, and Switching Brain States.Yi-Yuan Tang, Mary K. Rothbart & Michael I. Posner - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (6):330.
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  10.  30
    Contrasting Roles for Cingulate and Orbitofrontal Cortex in Decisions and Social Behaviour.M. F. Rushworth, T. E. Behrens, P. H. Rudebeck & M. E. Walton - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):168-176.
    There is general acknowledgement that both the anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex are implicated in reinforcement-guided decision making, and emotion and social behaviour. Despite the interest that these areas generate in both the cognitive neuroscience laboratory and the psychiatric clinic, ideas about the distinctive contributions made by each have only recently begun to emerge. This reflects an increasing understanding of the component processes that underlie reinforcement- guided decision making, such as the representation of reinforcement expectations, the exploration, updating and representation (...)
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  11. Unconscious Processing of Facial Affect in Children and Adolescents.William D. S. Killgore & Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd - 2007 - Social Neuroscience 2 (1):28-47.
     
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  12. Subtle is the Lord: The Relationship Between Consciousness, the Unconscious, and the Executive Control Network (ECN) of the Brain.Fred M. Levin & Colwyn Trevarthen - 2000 - Annual of Psychoanalysis 28:105-125.
     
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  13. Self-Awareness and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Inner Speech Use During Self-Related Processing.A. Morin & J. Michaud - 2007 - Brain Research Bulletin 74 (6):387-396.
    To test the hypothesis of a participation of inner speech in self-referential activity we reviewed 59 studies measuring brain activity during processing of self-information in the following self-domains: agency, self-recognition, emotions, personality traits, autobiographical memory, preference judgments, and REST. The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) has been shown to sustain inner speech use. We calculated the percentage of studies reporting LIFG activity for each self-dimension. 55.9% of all studies reviewed identified LIFG (and presumably inner speech) activity during self-awareness tasks. (...)
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  14.  2
    Sentence Comprehension and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Storage, Not Computation.Laurie A. Stowe - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):51-51.
    Neuroimaging evidence suggests that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) supports temporary storage of linguistic material during linguistic tasks rather than computing a syntactic representation. The LIFG is not activated by simple sentences but by complex sentences and maintenance of word lists. Under this hypothesis, agrammatism should only disturb comprehension for constructions in which storage is essential.
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  15.  1
    Category-Selective Attention Modulates Unconscious Processes in the Middle Occipital Gyrus.Shen Tu, Jiang Qiu, Ulla Martens & Qinglin Zhang - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):479-485.
    Many studies have revealed the top-down modulation on unconscious processing. However, there is little research about how category-selective attention could modulate the unconscious processing. In the present study, using functional magnetic resonance imaging , the results showed that category-selective attention modulated unconscious face/tool processing in the middle occipital gyrus . Interestingly, MOG effects were of opposed direction for face and tool processes. During unconscious face processing, activation in MOG decreased under the face-selective attention compared with tool-selective attention. This result (...)
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  16.  21
    The Visual Word Form Area: Expertise for Reading in the Fusiform Gyrus.Bruce D. McCandliss, Laurent Cohen & Stanislas Dehaene - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):293-299.
  17. Face, Eye, and Body Selective Responses in Fusiform Gyrus and Adjacent Cortex: An Intracranial EEG Study.Andrew D. Engell & Gregory McCarthy - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  18.  5
    Role of Left Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus in Phonological Processing for Speech Perception and Production.Bradley R. Buchsbaum, Gregory Hickok & Colin Humphries - 2001 - Cognitive Science 25 (5):663-678.
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  19.  1
    Reappraising Social Emotions: The Role of Inferior Frontal Gyrus, Temporo-Parietal Junction and Insula in Interpersonal Emotion Regulation.Alessandro Grecucci, Cinzia Giorgetta, Nicolao Bonini & Alan G. Sanfey - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  20.  15
    Attention to Faces in the Fusiform Gyrus.N. George - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (6):205.
  21.  15
    Face Up to the Fusiform Gyrus.T. Nichols - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (11):409.
  22.  15
    Superior Temporal Gyrus: A Neglected Cortical Area?Giuseppe Di Pellegrino - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (8):330.
  23.  2
    The Left Fusiform Gyrus is a Critical Region Contributing to the Core Behavioral Profile of Semantic Dementia.Junhua Ding, Keliang Chen, Yan Chen, Yuxing Fang, Qing Yang, Yingru Lv, Nan Lin, Yanchao Bi, Qihao Guo & Zaizhu Han - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  24.  2
    Medial Orbital Gyrus Modulation During Spatial Perspective Changes: Pre- Vs. Post-8weeks Mindfulness Meditation.Barbara Tomasino, Fabio Campanella & Franco Fabbro - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 40:147-158.
  25.  1
    Differential Processing of Consonance and Dissonance Within the Human Superior Temporal Gyrus.Francine Foo, David King-Stephens, Peter Weber, Kenneth Laxer, Josef Parvizi & Robert T. Knight - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  26.  1
    Neural Responses to Musical Consonance and Dissonance in the Human Superior Temporal Gyrus.Foo Francine, King-Stephens David, Weber Peter, Laxer Kenneth, Knight Robert & Parvizi Josef - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  27.  1
    Higher Language Ability is Related to Angular Gyrus Activation Increase During Semantic Processing, Independent of Sentence Incongruency.Helene Van Ettinger-Veenstra, Anita McAllister, Peter Lundberg, Thomas Karlsson & Maria Engström - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  28.  1
    Neural Mechanisms of Goal-Directed Behavior: Outcome-Based Response Selection is Associated with Increased Functional Coupling of the Angular Gyrus.Katharina Zwosta, Hannes Ruge & Uta Wolfensteller - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  29.  1
    Music Reduces Pain and Increases Resting State Fmri Bold Signal Amplitude in the Left Angular Gyrus in Fibromyalgia Patients.Eduardo A. Garza-Villarreal, Zhiguo Jiang, Peter Vuust, Sarael Alcauter, Lene Vase, Erick H. Pasaye, Roberto Cavazos-Rodriguez, Elvira Brattico, Troels S. Jensen & Fernando A. Barrios - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  30.  1
    Fusiform Gyrus Dysfunction is Associated with Perceptual Processing Efficiency to Emotional Faces in Adolescent Depression: A Model-Based Approach.Tiffany C. Ho, Shunan Zhang, Matthew D. Sacchet, Helen Weng, Colm G. Connolly, Eva Henje Blom, Laura K. M. Han, Nisreen O. Mobayed & Tony T. Yang - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  31.  1
    Repeated Measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow in the Left Superior Temporal Gyrus Reveal Tonic Hyperactivity in Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations: A Possible Trait Marker.Philipp Homan, Jochen Kindler, Martinus Hauf, Sebastian Walther, Daniela Hubl & Thomas Dierks - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  32. Self-Awareness and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Selective Involvement of Inner Speech in Self-Related Processes.Alain Morin & J. Michaud - manuscript
     
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  33. Altered Functional Connectivity of Fusiform Gyrus in Subjects with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Resting-State fMRI Study.Suping Cai, Tao Chong, Yun Zhang, Jun Li, Karen M. von Deneen, Junchan Ren, Minghao Dong & Liyu Huang - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  34. The Corpus Callosum, Cingulate Gyrus, Septum Pellucidum, Septal Area and Fornix.F. A. Elliott - 1969 - In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland. pp. 2--758.
     
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  35. Dentate Gyrus and Hilar Region Revisited.Houghton Conor - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  36. Discriminable Spatial Patterns of Activation for Faces and Bodies in the Fusiform Gyrus.Na Yeon Kim, Su Mei Lee, Margret C. Erlendsdottir & Gregory McCarthy - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  37. MEG Responses Over Right Inferior Frontal Gyrus During Stop-Signal Task Performance.Hughes Matthew, Woods William, Thomas Neil, Michie Patricia & Rossell Susan - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  38.  56
    The Proactive Brain: Using Analogies and Associations to Generate Predictions.M. Bar - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (7):280-289.
  39.  41
    Associative Memory and the Medial Temporal Lobes.A. Mayes, D. Montaldi & E. Migo - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):126-135.
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  40.  1
    Movement Contributes to Infants' Recognition of the Human Form.Tamara Christie & Virginia Slaughter - 2010 - Cognition 114 (3):329-337.
    Three experiments demonstrate that biological movement facilitates young infants’ recognition of the whole human form. A body discrimination task was used in which 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old infants were habituated to typical human bodies and then shown scrambled human bodies at the test. Recovery of interest to the scrambled bodies was observed in 9- and 12-month-old infants in Experiment 1, but only when the body images were animated to move in a biologically possible way. In Experiment 2, nonbiological movement was (...)
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  41.  68
    The Distributed Human Neural System for Face Perception.Elizabeth A. Hoffman, M. Ida Gobbini & James V. Haxby - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (6):223-233.
    Face perception, perhaps the most highly developed visual skill in humans, is mediated by a distributed neural system in humans that is comprised of multiple, bilateral regions. We propose a model for the organization of this system that emphasizes a distinction between the representation of invariant and changeable aspects of faces. The representation of invariant aspects of faces underlies the recognition of individuals, whereas the representation of changeable aspects of faces, such as eye gaze, expression, and lip movement, underlies the (...)
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  42. Synaesthesia: A Window Into Perception, Thought and Language.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (12):3-34.
    (1) The induced colours led to perceptual grouping and pop-out, (2) a grapheme rendered invisible through ‘crowding’ or lateral masking induced synaesthetic colours — a form of blindsight — and (3) peripherally presented graphemes did not induce colours even when they were clearly visible. Taken collectively, these and other experiments prove conclusively that synaesthesia is a genuine percep- tual phenomenon, not an effect based on memory associations from childhood or on vague metaphorical speech. We identify different subtypes of number–colour synaesthesia (...)
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  43.  84
    Neural Correlates of Moral Sensitivity and Moral Judgment Associated with Brain Circuitries of Selfhood: A Meta-Analysis.Hyemin Han - 2017 - Journal of Moral Education 46 (2):97-113.
    The present study meta-analyzed 45 experiments with 959 subjects and 463 activation foci reported in 43 published articles that investigated the neural mechanism of moral functions by comparing neural activity between the moral-task and non-moral-task conditions with the Activation Likelihood Estimate method. The present study examined the common activation foci of morality-related task conditions. In addition, this study compared the neural correlates of moral sensibility with the neural correlates of moral judgment, which are the two functional components in the Neo-Kohlbergian (...)
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  44. Spontaneous Activity in Default-Mode Network Predicts Ascriptions of Self-Relatedness to Stimuli.Pengmin Qin, Georg Northoff, Timothy Lane & et al - 2016 - Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience:xx-yy.
    Spontaneous activity levels prior to stimulus presentation can determine how that stimulus will be perceived. It has also been proposed that such spontaneous activity, particularly in the default-mode network (DMN), is involved in self-related processing. We therefore hypothesised that pre-stimulus activity levels in the DMN predict whether a stimulus is judged as self-related or not. Method: Participants were presented in the MRI scanner with a white noise stimulus that they were instructed contained their name or another. They then had to (...)
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  45.  91
    Psychophysical Investigations Into the Neural Basis of Synaesthesia.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Edward M. Hubbard - 2001 - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, B 268:979-983.
    We studied two otherwise normal, synaesthetic subjects who `saw' a speci¢c colour every time they saw a speci¢c number or letter. We conducted four experiments in order to show that this was a genuine perceptual experience rather than merely a memory association. (i)The synaesthetically induced colours could lead to perceptual grouping, even though the inducing numerals or letters did not. (ii)Synaesthetically induced colours were not experienced if the graphemes were presented peripherally. (iii)Roman numerals were ine¡ective: the actual number grapheme was (...)
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  46.  46
    Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Empathy: Concepts, Circuits, and Genes.Henrik Walter - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (1):9-17.
    This article reviews concepts of, as well as neurocognitive and genetic studies on, empathy. Whereas cognitive empathy can be equated with affective theory of mind, that is, with mentalizing the emotions of others, affective empathy is about sharing emotions with others. The neural circuits underlying different forms of empathy do overlap but also involve rather specific brain areas for cognitive (ventromedial prefrontal cortex) and affective (anterior insula, midcingulate cortex, and possibly inferior frontal gyrus) empathy. Furthermore, behavioral and imaging genetic (...)
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  47. The Misidentification Syndromes as Mindreading Disorders.William Hirstein - 2010 - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 15 (1-3):233-260.
    The patient with Capgras’ syndrome claims that people very familiar to him have been replaced by impostors. I argue that this disorder is due to the destruction of a representation that the patient has of the mind of the familiar person. This creates the appearance of a familiar body and face, but without the familiar personality, beliefs, and thoughts. The posterior site of damage in Capgras’ is often reported to be the temporoparietal junction, an area that has a role in (...)
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  48.  31
    Differential Involvement of Left Prefrontal Cortexin Inductive and Deductive Reasoning.V. Goel - 2004 - Cognition 93 (3):B109-B121.
    While inductive and deductive reasoning are considered distinct logical and psychological processes, little is known about their respective neural basis. To address this issue we scanned 16 subjects with fMRI, using an event-related design, while they engaged in inductive and deductive reasoning tasks. Both types of reasoning were characterized by activation of left lateral prefrontal and bilateral dorsal frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices. Neural responses unique to each type of reasoning determined from the Reasoning Type by Task interaction indicated greater (...)
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  49.  2
    The Neural Basis of Event-Time Introspection.Adrian G. Guggisberg, Sarang S. Dalal, Armin Schnider & Srikantan S. Nagarajan - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1899-1915.
    We explored the neural mechanisms allowing humans to report the subjective onset times of conscious events. Magnetoencephalographic recordings of neural oscillations were obtained while human subjects introspected the timing of sensory, intentional, and motor events during a forced choice task. Brain activity was reconstructed with high spatio-temporal resolution. Event-time introspection was associated with specific neural activity at the time of subjective event onset which was spatially distinct from activity induced by the event itself. Different brain regions were selectively recruited for (...)
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  50.  6
    Developing Mechanisms of Self-Regulation in Early Life.Mary K. Rothbart, Brad E. Sheese, M. Rosario Rueda & Michael I. Posner - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (2):207-213.
    Children show increasing control of emotions and behavior during their early years. Our studies suggest a shift in control from the brain’s orienting network in infancy to the executive network by the age of 3—4 years. Our longitudinal study indicates that orienting influences both positive and negative affect, as measured by parent report in infancy. At 3—4 years of age, the dominant control of affect rests in a frontal brain network that involves the anterior cingulate gyrus. Connectivity of brain (...)
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