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  1.  29
    History of Science Today, 2.: History of Science in the Netherlands.H. A. M. Snelders - 1987 - British Journal for the History of Science 20 (3):343-348.
    After Jacobus Henricus van't Hoff had passed away on 1 March 1911, his pupil Charles Marinus van Deventer wrote a very personal ‘in memoriam’ in the Dutch literary periodical De Gids, pointing out that van't Hoff had merely been interested in scientific facts, not in the people discovering these facts. Van't Hoff considered the study of the history of chemistry, although by no means uncongenial, a matter of little importance. He once even said: ‘To me historical research appears to be (...)
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  2.  29
    A. M. Mayer's Experiments with Floating Magnets and Their Use in the Atomic Theories of Matter.H. A. M. Snelders - 1976 - Annals of Science 33 (1):67-80.
    In the years 1878 and 1879 the American physicist Alfred Marshall Mayer published his experiments with floating magnets as a didactic illustration of molecular actions and forms. A number of physicists made use of this analogy of molecular structure. For William Thomson they were a mechanical illustration of the kinetic equilibrium of groups of columnar vortices revolving in circles round their common centre of gravity . A number of modifications of Mayer's experiments were described, which gave configurations which were more (...)
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  3.  26
    The Reception in the Netherlands of the Discoveries of Electromagnetism and Electrodynamics.H. A. M. Snelders - 1975 - Annals of Science 32 (1):39-54.
    On 17 November 1820 there appeared a Dutch translation of Oersted's pamphlet concerning the discovery of the effect of an electric current on a magnetic needle suspended in the earth's magnetic field . In the Netherlands a number of physicists were immediately interested in the electromagnetic and electrodynamic discoveries made by Oersted and the French physicists. They repeated and extended the experiments, and constructed new modifications of the galvanic battery for better results. They made no fundamental discoveries in this field (...)
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  4.  5
    The Dutch Physical Chemist J. J. Van Laar Versus J. H. Van't Hoff's "Osmotic School".H. A. M. Snelders - 1986 - Centaurus 29 (1):53-71.
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  5.  16
    J. S. C. Schweigger: His Romanticism and His Crystal Electrical Theory of Matter.H. A. M. Snelders - 1971 - Isis 62 (3):328-338.
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  6.  16
    The Influence of the Dualistic System of Jakob Joseph Winterl on the German Romantic Era.H. A. M. Snelders - 1970 - Isis 61 (2):231-240.
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  7.  19
    James F. W. Johnston's Influence on Agricultural Chemistry in the Netherlands.H. A. M. Snelders - 1981 - Annals of Science 38 (5):571-584.
    This paper describes the introduction of Liebig's ideas on agricultural chemistry into the Netherlands. The aversion to Liebig held by the Utrecht professor G. J. Mulder hindered the direct influence that might have been borne by Liebig's own writings; the introduction was made principally by means of Dutch translations of the text-books of the Scottish agricultural chemist J. F. W. Johnston, who generally followed Liebig's ideas.
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  8.  14
    Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries Goethe and the Scientific Tradition. By H. B. Nisbet. London: Institute of Germanic Studies, University of London, 1972. Pp. Xii + 83. No Price Stated. [REVIEW]H. A. M. Snelders - 1974 - British Journal for the History of Science 7 (2):194-195.
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  9.  12
    Briefe eines romantischen Physikers: Johann Wilhelm Ritter an Gotthilf Heinrich Schubert und an Karl von HardenbergFriedrich Klemm Armin Hermann.H. A. M. Snelders - 1967 - Isis 58 (4):582-583.
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  10.  9
    The Electromagnetic Experiments of the Utrecht Physicist Gerrit Moll (1785–1838).H. A. M. Snelders - 1984 - Annals of Science 41 (1):35-55.
    The Utrecht professor of physics Gerrit Moll , well-known for his defence of British science against Charles Babbage's Reflections on the Decline of Science in England , did—in co-operation with members of the Natuurkundig Gezelschap at Utrecht—important work on the reception in The Netherlands of the new electromagnetic and electrodynamic discoveries . He also carried out fundamental research into the lifting power of electromagnets, which he had seen during his visit to London in 1828. In 1830, Moll published his experiments (...)
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  11.  2
    The Researches of the Dutch Chemists About the Nature of the Sulphides.H. A. M. Snelders - 1975 - Centaurus 19 (3):220-237.
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  12.  5
    Lamarck's Theory of the Earth: Comments.H. A. M. Snelders & Albert V. Carozzi - 1965 - Isis 56 (3):356-357.
  13.  5
    Reply to Query No. 155.H. A. M. Snelders - 1965 - Isis 56 (2):210-211.
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  14.  2
    Goethe and the Scientific Tradition. [REVIEW]H. A. M. Snelders - 1974 - British Journal for the History of Science 7 (2):194-195.
  15. Studies on Christian Huygens.H. J. Bos, M. J. S. Rudwick, H. A. M. Snelders & R. P. W. Visser - 1983 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 34 (3):295-303.